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Thank you for reading my question! I have a 2019 cub cadet LT 1000 tractor. My wife said it turned off and now it will not restart. My wife had major brain surgery so I am not sure. I replaced the starter, starter solenoid, oil filter, air filter, gas filter. No luck. All I get is a click when I do turn the key. I finally noticed that the fan at the very top of the engine does not spin. Following that area, I found out the drive pulley is frozen. Will the tractor not start because of a frozen drive pulley. I would think that might be putting too much strain on the starter. That may have nothing to do with it though. Thank you for your ideas!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I have a 2019 cub cadet. It is an LT 1000 lawn tractor. Simple question, should I be able to turn the fly wheel at the top of the engine and or the drive pulley underneath. Both are stuck and I cannot get the tractor to start. I don’t know if it’s some thing that will not move without the tractor running. Thank you very much for your time.
 

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Welcome! There is no need for multiple posts, somebody will respond in a timely manner. Remove the spark plugs and try turning it over by hand, it may be flooded. If still no joy the engine is seized likely due to insufficient oil.
 

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I use scissors! Twice a week.
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If there are belts still on the crankshaft pulleys, perhaps take those off, just to determine if it's the engine that can't turn, or something external is preventing the engine from turning.
 

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Hi David, welcome to the forum! I'm sorry to hear about your wife's surgery, I hope she is doing ok.

I agree that removing the spark plug(s) is a good place to start, in case there is liquid in the cylinder preventing the engine from turning.

With them removed, can you turn the flywheel (the screen at the top of the engine) by hand?

The drive belt for the transmission will be tight all the time. The deck belt will also be tight all the time, if this has electric blades engagement. If it is a big manual lever for the blades, then the blades belt should be loose when they are disengaged.

Just for the basics, the brake is fully engaged, the blades are turned off, and you're sitting in the seat when trying to start it, right?

It's possible that the engine seized. But I'd check the simple items first, hopefully it's not that bad.
 

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Dave,
If the items RedOctober mentioned are OK, a basic engine health diagnosis is needed.
Remove the spark plug.
You should be able to remove the round screen that is on top of the engine to access the crank shaft nut. Use a socket wrench on that nut to slowly turn the engine over by hand. This should tell you if there was any internal damage or if the engine seized up as either it will not turn over, will not turn fairly easily, or if it clunks or stops dead during 360 degrees of rotation.
Only if you can manually turn it easily, then try the starter again without the plug installed. It should spin fairly quickly without the plug in it.
If it won't turn manually with the plug, you may have some internal damage or it has seized requiring tear down to properly assess.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If there are belts still on the crankshaft pulleys, perhaps take those off, just to determine if it's the engine that can't turn, or something external is preventing the engine from turning.
Great idea thank you!
Hi David, welcome to the forum! I'm sorry to hear about your wife's surgery, I hope she is doing ok.

I agree that removing the spark plug(s) is a good place to start, in case there is liquid in the cylinder preventing the engine from turning.

With them removed, can you turn the flywheel (the screen at the top of the engine) by hand?

The drive belt for the transmission will be tight all the time. The deck belt will also be tight all the time, if this has electric blades engagement. If it is a big manual lever for the blades, then the blades belt should be loose when they are disengaged.

Just for the basics, the brake is fully engaged, the blades are turned off, and you're sitting in the seat when trying to start it, right?

It's possible that the engine seized. But I'd check the simple items first, hopefully it's not that bad.
thank you for your concern of my wife. She has about a 80% mental capacity. We laugh together every day. I have removed both spark plugs. I cannot turn the fly wheel at the top of the engine it will not move. It does have electric blade engagement . The break is depressed, the blades are turned off and the seat safety switch is disconnected. After all of this, my wife told me that after this happened she called me and I told her to check the oil. She drained enough oil out of it to fill about 1 1/2 of those red plastic Dixie cups.I realize that’s not a lot of oil but should that be enough to prevent the seizing if that’s what it is? Thank you so much for your time. I am the type of person that never asked for help, but always willing to give help to somebody else. But this one has me stumped.
 

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Well even at 80%, she may be doing better than some of us! :) I'm not trying to make light of her situation at all, of course. I'm sorry she's had to go through that.

Is the seat switch newly-disconnected? Depending on how they are wired, just disconnecting the switch may make the tractor think that switch is in the wrong position (that no one is in the seat). If it's always started that way, no problem, but if it was disconnected after this problem started, I would re-connect it, to eliminate one possible complication.

I don't know how big those cups are, so it's tough to gauge how much oil that was. Certainly engines get run with too-little oil and they don't all just die immediately, but if the level was significantly low, that doesn't help, of course.

Can you get a wrench on a bolt that turns with the transmission pulley, for instance? Something connected directly to the engine? I think it would be good to try the suggestion of turning the engine with a wrench, since you're saying you can't turn it by hand. That is not good news. Whatever would let you put a wrench on it, easily, without removing a bunch of stuff, is what I would try next.

If it will not move at all, the piston may have seized. If it will rotate in one direction, but not the other, a piston connecting rod may have broken. You should be able to rotate it through 2 full rotations, that will turn everything at least once.
 

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I was trying to find a manual for a Cub Cadet LT 1000, and failing. I can't find a Cub reference to that model number. Craftsman has made an LT1000, and I know Cub has LTX models (1048, etc), but I didn't have much lucking searching for a Cub LT1000. Regardless, the info discussed so far is generic enough that it would apply to pretty much any tractor, and doesn't depend on your exact model.

I wanted to find your oil capacity, since as a crude estimate, you could compare that amount, to the volume of the plastic cups of oil that drained out. To at least get a sense of whether it might have been just a little low, or REALLY low. If that capacity info is in your manual, that might help understand how much oil it was running with. It doesn't change any of the current situation, of course, it may just help better understand the engine's condition before this happened.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well even at 80%, she may be doing better than some of us! :) I'm not trying to make light of her situation at all, of course. I'm sorry she's had to go through that.

Is the seat switch newly-disconnected? Depending on how they are wired, just disconnecting the switch may make the tractor think that switch is in the wrong position (that no one is in the seat). If it's always started that way, no problem, but if it was disconnected after this problem started, I would re-connect it, to eliminate one possible complication.

I don't know how big those cups are, so it's tough to gauge how much oil that was. Certainly engines get run with too-little oil and they don't all just die immediately, but if the level was significantly low, that doesn't help, of course.

Can you get a wrench on a bolt that turns with the transmission pulley, for instance? Something connected directly to the engine? I think it would be good to try the suggestion of turning the engine with a wrench, since you're saying you can't turn it by hand. That is not good news. Whateve would let you put a wrench on it, easily, without removing a bunch of stuff, is what I would try next.

If it will not move at all, the piston may have seized. If it will rotate in one direction, but not the other, a piston connecting rod may have broken. You should be able to rotate it through 2 full rotations, that will turn everything at least once.
I loved your opening line! I took the cutting deck off and everything is pretty easy to reach the drive pulley which is connected to the other pulleys for the cutting deck I am able to turn the cutting deck pulleys very easily but the drive pulley is frozen. The pulley by the transmission turns easily. I can turn the bolt that is holding the pulleys and at this point I can turn them in either direction and the bolt is not even coming off. I’m pretty much resigned to saying that the engine is blown. I own a restaurant and I am not home from 9 AM to 7:30 PM so my wife has been able to cut the grass but she makes a lot of mistakes. I think it was just too low in oil and so it’s seized up. I am now looking into a used tractor and or swapping out the engine on this one. Do you think I can switch a Kohler engine to a Briggs & Stratton engine?
 

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I loved your opening line! I took the cutting deck off and everything is pretty easy to reach the drive pulley which is connected to the other pulleys for the cutting deck I am able to turn the cutting deck pulleys very easily but the drive pulley is frozen. The pulley by the transmission turns easily. I can turn the bolt that is holding the pulleys and at this point I can turn them in either direction and the bolt is not even coming off. I’m pretty much resigned to saying that the engine is blown. I own a restaurant and I am not home from 9 AM to 7:30 PM so my wife has been able to cut the grass but she makes a lot of mistakes. I think it was just too low in oil and so it’s seized up. I am now looking into a used tractor and or swapping out the engine on this one. Do you think I can switch a Kohler engine to a Briggs & Stratton engine?
I confess I'm not 100% clear on which things you can turn, and which you can't :) Pulleys that aren't directly at the engine aren't important, as to whether or not they can turn.

If you can remove the screen at the top of the engine (on the flywheel), and turn the big flywheel nut with a wrench, that will try to rotate the engine directly. You don't want to remove that flywheel nut, you would just be using it as a solid attachment point, for trying to slowly rotate the engine by-hand.

An engine swap is definitely possible. But that is something of a project. Crankshaft diameters and lengths need to be compatible. Engine mounting bolt holes as well, but are usually less of an issue. However, wiring is frequently not just plug-and-play.

From what I gather, owning a restaurant is a very time-consuming occupation! If you want to be back up and running quickly, without a whole project on your hands (with potential hiccups and discoveries along the way), I think finding a used machine is the way to go. At least for the short term.

You could then take the time to keep an eye out for an inexpensive engine source, and do the swap over the winter, etc. And sell the used machine later, if you chose.

It depends on what you want to get into, and what you find fun. But an engine swap is likely to take a bunch of time. I'm not proposing junking the tractor. You can sometimes get used tractors very cheap (like free, or $100-200), with a blown transmission, or rusted-out mower deck, etc. And now you have an engine source. Because buying just a suitable engine by-itself is almost certainly more expensive (maybe $600-800?) than buying a cheap tractor that has other problems, but a good engine.

But it will take some time to do a swap, unless you get lucky and you find a machine with the same engine & wiring, for instance, and it simply bolts right in. If it were me, I'd look for something used, for now, and then try to do the engine swap in the off-season. Especially if you're happy with the tractor otherwise, and it's in good shape.
 

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If the drained oil is still available, you might check it carefully for any "silvery sheen" or bits of metal in it. That would mean something is wrong internally.

I believe you mentioned that you cannot turn the engine from up top with the plugs removed, and the brake off. As mentioned use the center nut on the fly wheel, and using a socket wrench, give it a good clockwise pull. It if won't budge, I am afraid you are looking at a seized engine. If so, have a good look at RedOctober's good suggestions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I confess I'm not 100% clear on which things you can turn, and which you can't :) Pulleys that aren't directly at the engine aren't important, as to whether or not they can turn.

If you can remove the screen at the top of the engine (on the flywheel), and turn the big flywheel nut with a wrench, that will try to rotate the engine directly. You don't want to remove that flywheel nut, you would just be using it as a solid attachment point, for trying to slowly rotate the engine by-hand.

An engine swap is definitely possible. But that is something of a project. Crankshaft diameters and lengths need to be compatible. Engine mounting bolt holes as well, but are usually less of an issue. However, wiring is frequently not just plug-and-play.

From what I gather, owning a restaurant is a very time-consuming occupation! If you want to be back up and running quickly, without a whole project on your hands (with potential hiccups and discoveries along the way), I think finding a used machine is the way to go. At least for the short term.

You could then take the time to keep an eye out for an inexpensive engine source, and do the swap over the winter, etc. And sell the used machine later, if you chose.

It depends on what you want to get into, and what you find fun. But an engine swap is likely to take a bunch of time. I'm not proposing junking the tractor. You can sometimes get used tractors very cheap (like free, or $100-200), with a blown transmission, or rusted-out mower deck, etc. And now you have an engine source. Because buying just a suitable engine by-itself is almost certainly more expensive (maybe $600-800?) than buying a cheap tractor that has other problems, but a good engine.

But it will take some time to do a swap, unless you get lucky and you find a machine with the same engine & wiring, for instance, and it simply bolts right in. If it were me, I'd look for something used, for now, and then try to do the engine swap in the off-season. Especially if you're happy with the tractor otherwise, and it's in good shape.
I think that is a great idea! Thank you very much! With the help I got from you guys I'm sure she ran out of oil, but I still love her!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
What is the make and numbers from the engine? If a Briggs and Stratoon they will be stamped on the valve cover, we don't want the YXS yadda yadda from the sticker.
Thank you for your help! I am convinced it is a seized engine. I will buy a used tractor in the meantime and wait it out to see if someone is selling a similar tractor with maybe a broken transmission.
 
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