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Nothing like that old car smell to bring back memories. 🍻

What are your plans...? Looks pretty clean.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Not sure I’m still praying on that one. It was always garage kept until my grandpa died and after grandma hit it a couple times pulling into the garage my brother parked it outside for a few years😡. Driving it and enjoying the memories of past and making new with my kids is an absolute.
 

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Years ago grandma made grandpa take hipo exhaust off. So I may just rod it up a bit like grandpa always liked
 

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forkz
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my brother inheritrd a 66 wildcat with a 445
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Until just a few years before grandpa passed It is as completely original except the exhaust he was even running the original tires which are still in the garage
 

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This has the 401 “410” wildcat
That was available in both the 2 barrel and 4 barrel engine. I learned to drive in a 63 LeSabre 4 door red beast with no power steering, no power brakes , no air. Try parallel parking that beast when your a 16 year old kid that weighed 120lbs soaking wet. I especially remember the Dynaflow transmission with the "Switch Pitch" as they called it. When the accelerator was floored the RPM's immediately hit 2800 and the beastly machine with gobs of torque turned the tires and started to move. The real treat was the Low gear which the transmission never used. The only way you started in low was to manually put it in low unlike all the other transmissions at the time. By the way...it would tear the heck out of the tires in low and one had to shift quickly at 40 mph to keep from hitting the red line.
 

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That was available in both the 2 barrel and 4 barrel engine. I learned to drive in a 63 LeSabre 4 door red beast with no power steering, no power brakes , no air. Try parallel parking that beast when your a 16 year old kid that weighed 120lbs soaking wet. I especially remember the Dynaflow transmission with the "Switch Pitch" as they called it. When the accelerator was floored the RPM's immediately hit 2800 and the beastly machine with gobs of torque turned the tires and started to move. The real treat was the Low gear which the transmission never used. The only way you started in low was to manually put it in low unlike all the other transmissions at the time. By the way...it would tear the heck out of the tires in low and one had to shift quickly at 40 mph to keep from hitting the red line.
I'm not 100% sure but I think the Dynaflows were in the early to mid 50's.. 🤔 think they were gone by the 60's.
Had one once in a 1950 and had a straight 8..
 

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I'll never get to 10,000
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Very nice! I had the stripped down version, '66 Buick Special. Was still a great car.
 

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my brother inheritrd a 66 wildcat with a 445
Buick used some strange numbers to identify their cars cubic inch. 445 was one of them. Only made a 401 and 425 cubic inch of that time (mid 50's to mid 60's). Of course they made smaller v8's but never a 445.

 

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I'm not 100% sure but I think the Dynaflows were in the early to mid 50's.. 🤔 think they were gone by the 60's.
Had one once in a 1950 and had a straight 8..
No, the Dynaflows were still available in 1963.

he Dynaflow was an automatic transmission used in various forms in Buick cars by the General Motors Corporation from 1947 until 1963. The transmission initially used a five-element torque converter, with two turbines and two stators, as well as a planetary gearset that provided two forward speeds plus reverse.

Note the gear indicator. Has D and L In D the transmission did NOT shift. I know I grew up with one. After the 1963 model year they changed the transmissions. I had for my first car a 1964 Buick LeSabre with a 2 speed automatic it started in low and shifted to high just like a powerglide with the exception they had the variable speed turbine/torque converter.
 

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Buick used some strange numbers to identify their cars cubic inch. 445 was one of them. Only made a 401 and 425 cubic inch of that time (mid 50's to mid 60's). Of course they made smaller v8's but never a 445.

The 445 designation was a torque figure. The 401 had the 425 designation on the snorkle and the 425 had the 445 designation.
401 (400)


1963 401 "Nailhead"

The 364 was enlarged[clarification needed] to 401 cu in (6.6 L) and produced from 1959 to 1966. Originally a 401, it was later redesignated a 400 to meet 1960s GM directives for maximum displacement engines in mid-size cars.
The 401/400 became Buick's full-size and later intermediate muscle car powerplant of choice, used in the company's Skylark Gran Sport and Buick Wildcat models, among others. The engine was variously designated the Wildcat 375, Wildcat 410, and Wildcat 445 depending on the foot-pounds of torque each version produced. The Wildcat 410 was the two-barrel carbureted engine, standard on the 1962-63 LeSabre. The Wildcat 375 was a no-cost option for the 1962-63 LeSabre that used a lower compression ratio to run on lower-octane fuel. The various Wildcat engines had decals on their air cleaners indicating their version; however, the four-barrel edition of the 1966-67 small-block Buick 340 V8 was also labeled Wildcat 375 on its air cleaner, but was not a nailhead engine.
The Wildcat 445, with a single four-barrel carburetor, was the standard engine in the Invicta, 1959-1966 Electra, 1962–1966 Buick Wildcat, 1963 Riviera and 1965 Riviera (the 1964 and 1966 Riviera models used the 425 with a single four-barrel carburetor, labeled Wildcat 465, as standard equipment). Mounted on a trolley, Buick 401s were also used as starter motors for the SR-71 Blackbird supersonic jet.
In an effort to overcome the restrictive exhaust-port design of the nailhead, Buick drag racing enthusiasts in the 1960s adapted superchargers with a custom camshaft to feed intake air in through the exhaust ports; the larger intake ports became the exhaust outlets.
425


Super Wildcat 425 cu in (7.0 L) 390 hp (291 kW) engine

The 425 cu in (7.0 L) was produced from 1963 to 1966. The largest-displacement version of the nailhead, it began as an option on the 1963 Riviera and was later available on the Wildcat and Electra models. The 1964 and 1966 Riviera used the 425 engine as standard equipment.
Four-barrel carburetion was standard on the basic 425, called the Wildcat 465 for the foot-pounds of torque it developed. The Super Wildcat (Regular Production Option {RPO}-coded Y48) was available on the 1965 Riviera Gran Sport and 1966 Wildcat GS which included two four-barrel carburetors and matching intake manifold. Coded "MW", these parts were delivered in the car's trunk for dealer installation. Toward the end of the 1966 model year, in approximately May 1966, Buick offered the Super Wildcat 465 with factory-installed dual 4-barrel Carter AFB carburetors as an "MZ" option. Only one hundred seventy-nine 1966 Riviera GS cars were built with the MZ package.
 

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The 445 designation was a torque figure. The 401 had the 425 designation on the snorkle and the 425 had the 445 designation.
401 (400)


1963 401 "Nailhead"

The 364 was enlarged[clarification needed] to 401 cu in (6.6 L) and produced from 1959 to 1966. Originally a 401, it was later redesignated a 400 to meet 1960s GM directives for maximum displacement engines in mid-size cars.
The 401/400 became Buick's full-size and later intermediate muscle car powerplant of choice, used in the company's Skylark Gran Sport and Buick Wildcat models, among others. The engine was variously designated the Wildcat 375, Wildcat 410, and Wildcat 445 depending on the foot-pounds of torque each version produced. The Wildcat 410 was the two-barrel carbureted engine, standard on the 1962-63 LeSabre. The Wildcat 375 was a no-cost option for the 1962-63 LeSabre that used a lower compression ratio to run on lower-octane fuel. The various Wildcat engines had decals on their air cleaners indicating their version; however, the four-barrel edition of the 1966-67 small-block Buick 340 V8 was also labeled Wildcat 375 on its air cleaner, but was not a nailhead engine.
The Wildcat 445, with a single four-barrel carburetor, was the standard engine in the Invicta, 1959-1966 Electra, 1962–1966 Buick Wildcat, 1963 Riviera and 1965 Riviera (the 1964 and 1966 Riviera models used the 425 with a single four-barrel carburetor, labeled Wildcat 465, as standard equipment). Mounted on a trolley, Buick 401s were also used as starter motors for the SR-71 Blackbird supersonic jet.
In an effort to overcome the restrictive exhaust-port design of the nailhead, Buick drag racing enthusiasts in the 1960s adapted superchargers with a custom camshaft to feed intake air in through the exhaust ports; the larger intake ports became the exhaust outlets.
425


Super Wildcat 425 cu in (7.0 L) 390 hp (291 kW) engine

The 425 cu in (7.0 L) was produced from 1963 to 1966. The largest-displacement version of the nailhead, it began as an option on the 1963 Riviera and was later available on the Wildcat and Electra models. The 1964 and 1966 Riviera used the 425 engine as standard equipment.
Four-barrel carburetion was standard on the basic 425, called the Wildcat 465 for the foot-pounds of torque it developed. The Super Wildcat (Regular Production Option {RPO}-coded Y48) was available on the 1965 Riviera Gran Sport and 1966 Wildcat GS which included two four-barrel carburetors and matching intake manifold. Coded "MW", these parts were delivered in the car's trunk for dealer installation. Toward the end of the 1966 model year, in approximately May 1966, Buick offered the Super Wildcat 465 with factory-installed dual 4-barrel Carter AFB carburetors as an "MZ" option. Only one hundred seventy-nine 1966 Riviera GS cars were built with the MZ package.
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there you go.. Clears a lot of things up...
 

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That's a beauty with some nice family history. I'd really like to see some more pics of it.
 
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