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Hi All,

Well I finally did it, I bought a Cub 127 and instantly I have problems. It ran when I bought it but when I got it home I couldn't get it started. I found crap in the tank, burnt points, bad plug, carb overflowing with gas. I addressed those issues and it starts and runs pretty good until I put it under a load and then it stalls. I didn't want to do too many things at once so I wouldn't chase my tail but no choice. I followed the manual for carb adjustment initial settings, set the points at .020, gapped the plug at .035. Any procedures you guys follow on a start up like this? Oh and I adjusted the governor arm.

My next task is to do the head gasket, adjust the valves and clean up the carbon but I don't want to do that until I am all set to this point.

My brake pedal hits the floor with not much breaking, my shifter doesn't stay in gear, the front end is loose as a goose and the tractor goes like 100mph when you head down a hill.

Anybody live near Brooklyn, CT that can help a fellow Cub fan?

Thanks,
Jim
 

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Regarding it's stalling under load, chances are that the "high" needle needs to be opened more so that the engine has enough fuel supply. The initial adjustments are only to get the engine running. I'll make initial adjustments, start the engine, adjust the high, and low needles (turning them back, and forth one at a time until I find what seems like a good position for both, and also no stumbling as I throttle up from idle) then drive it around, taking a screwdriver with me so I can stop, and fine tune as needed. It usually involves opening the "high" needle some, due to stumbling.

Also, since you haven't adjusted your carb. beyond it's initial (start up) settings, your adjusting the governor is likely compensating for the carb.'s not being adjusted, and may have altered the governor's proper adjustment. I would return the governor back to it's initial position, adjust the carb. and go from there, if necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Tractortag,

I got my hands dirty and jumped in with both feet so to speak...lol Knowing that the carbon needs to be cleaned up in the head I pulled the head and I found a badly leaking head gasket and signs of oil use. I cleaned it up, put a new head gasket and set everything I could back to factory specs. The points were fried so I replaced them and set to .020, the plug was shot so I replaced it with the same Champion H10 at .025, I set the high needle to 2.5 turns and the idle mixture to 1.75 turns and I reset the governor. Once I jumped it with my truck it started right up and nothing had to be changed. While the gas tank was off I emptied it and took the petcock completely apart and found it plugged up. No smoke and it runs like new but I guess it needs rings, when I checked compression it was at 30psi but I don't know if that means anything with the ACR?

Thanks for the response!

Jim
 

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A compression tester doesn't give an accurate reading on a small engine that has a compression release,either "built in" to the camshaft,or one that uses a flyweight on the cam gear to hold one valve open a crack to ease starting effort..

Briggs manuals state "spinning the flywheel rapidly in the opposite direction ,should result in a sharp rebound",if it does that,it has sufficient compression...if it isn't blowing blue smoke and using oil or fouling the spark plug,I'd say the compression is "normal"..
 

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Good luck with it...it is a great little tractor....to work on the "front end"...it is probably actually the Ross steering box...they get loose...you can get the parts to rebuild it...to rebuild it you must remove the steering wheel...that is the hardest part, best accomplished with a gear splitter...and a good soaking in your favorite penetrant...there are 2 bolts underneath that attach the box to the chassis...take them out....these are most easily accessed by removing the sheet of metal that protects the bottom....that is held on by 4 small bolts if I remember they have 1/4 inch heads on them with a star washer , disconnect the tie rod end that holds the pitman arm on and the shaft will slide down...with the tube in which it is encased...you can pull out the cam follower and check it for wear....as most people don't know to grease the steering box they tend to be badly worn out of shape...that causes a lot of slop in the steering...they can be reground, or you can actually make one out of a #8 hard 1/2 inch bolt by grinding it down...but to buy one is only about 12 dollars new ...and they are readily available...the rebuild was recently discussed in this post https://www.mytractorforum.com/12-john-deere-forum/1340271-steering-gear-box.html and has links to some youtube video and sources for the parts to rebuild....you will see reference to a "thrust bearing"...about 20 dollars available from a couple of sources...that can help smooth the steering once you get everything tightened up, but not very noticeably. in my opinion....these Ross boxes were used in several brands of tractors...not just cadets, so you will see references to the other tractors also in that thread...you can also add new tie rod ends...again a source for them is in that thread for which I provided a link

For the shift handle ....take the plate off that is in between the dash tower and the seat ....between your legs ...there are 4 screws that hold it down...you will see the shift linkage right under that plate another area that is out of sight and could use grease, but never gets it until you know about it...it likely needs grease or oil at the pivot points and you can check what is causing the problem....in fixing both of these problems you are going to see how ingenious the construction of that tractor is and how well it is designed and made...good luck with it...sounds like you got the engine figured out...I think that was the hard part of this
 
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