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Hey everyone. We moved to a place in the country so I got a Craftsman YT 4500 to take care of the larger lawn. Shopped around, looked at things ranging from small Kubotas on down to cheap Poulan riding mowers and settled on the YT.

The Craftsmans looked *identical* to John Deere L series and Husqvarna mowers. I mean, identical right down to the smallest detail (except for color and logos). So I looked at prices and looked a warranty. Sears won in both categories. Love the big 54" deck. Impressed with the 2cyl Kohler engine so far. Belts and maintenance points are easy to get to. Even the deck can be dropped out from under without much work. Didn't need a sleeve hitch, so I didn't step up to the GT series, but this YT tractor is the top of the line otherwise.

The tractor's not perfect though. It's too light. I've aired the rear tires down quite a bit and it still loves to spin on uneven terrain. The frame is more flexible than my old 80's vintage JD L series. The butt-switch that turns off the motor when you stand up is annoying but fixable. The hood flops all over the place and refuses to stay shut.

So.... anyone added innertubes and calcium to their Craftsman? I'm tempted to do it myself, but I'd need to get a filler adapter and a pump.
 

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Windshield washer fluid (winter), RV anti-freeze and automotive anti-freeze with water are popular ones here. Tubes are a good idea too. Quite a few threads on it if you do a search for loaded tires.

Big increase in traction and overall stability whatever you choose.

:MTF_wel2:
 

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Thanks. Any tips for wheel weights that are cheaper than the ones from Sears? They seem to want $65 per wheel. That's awful steep for a chunk of iron.

As a teenager I ran my dad's JD which had tubes and antifreeze ballast, plowing snow. Worked like a champ, but tubes are $15-$20 a piece, plus the cost of a fill adapter and antifreeze or calcium chloride..... I might as well find some scrap iron and bolt it to the wheels.

Took the rear tires down to 8 psi (holy cow were they ever overinflated from the store) and it has already helped a bunch.
 

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Thanks. Any tips for wheel weights that are cheaper than the ones from Sears? They seem to want $65 per wheel. That's awful steep for a chunk of iron.
I don't think they're even cast iron but I haven't looked in a while. The ones I've seen are plastic filled with something to make them heavy.

I've seen some plastic ones for about $60 a pair online but you have to fill them with concrete yourself plus provide your own mounting hardware.

Supposedly JD makes some cast ones for 12" wheels that weigh 70# ea. I'm after a set of those but they'll have to be local. I'm not paying to ship 140 lbs. of iron around the country. :)

I filled my tires with a garden sprayer jury rigged with some tubing.
 

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You're probably spinning because you have "turf saver" tires-totally useless unless you have a perfectly level lawn and don't try to do any work other than mowing-IMHO.

Cosider "AG" tires or one of the ATV tread patterns that you like. Load the tires with Windshield washer fluid-cheaper than going with tubes and calcium and filling adapter-remember that stuff EATS metal.


If you only have "spinning" issues in limited applications, consider a set of chains. I picked up a set for $40 shipping included for one of my units as it was much, much cheaper than replacing tires.

Good Luck,

Ev
 

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If you use WWF, you should also use tubes. WWF contains Methanol and it's highly corrosive.

I posted about this last year after testing the stuff.
 

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Your YT is the same as my YS4500. It is for mowing and pulling a cart only. Go with wheel weights or you can make a box to mount to the back and use cement in the box or fill it with steel. That can be a pain but many members here do just that. Filling the tires you need a tubes and if you get a flat you have a mess and need to refill them. Water is a little over 7 pounds per gallon. I think you will get much more weight with wheel weights and you also need to change the style of tires on the rear end. The JD L series in not made by JD It is name only. You are not getting a JD tracor with that series.
They are not JD quality.
 

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The problem with a YT 4500 is it has small wheels and tires. It is basically the same as a DGS 6500, except for the wheels and tires and transaxle. The larger turf tires on a DGS don't have enough traction, I could see why the little 20 x 10 tires on a YT 4500 would be hard to hold the HP of the Kohler.

If you loaded a tire like this in the 22x11x10 size. It would cure most of your traction problems.
 

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The problem with adding weight to the tractor is the axle loading spec on these tractors. Unfortunately, the Tuff Torque page I had bookmarked with the K66 specs is gone but IIRC, the axle loading was only about 540 lbs. And that's on a K66, a YT will be less. So, if you add your weight, the weight of the rear of the tractor, it doesn't leave a lot of room for adding weight. Some for sure but it will be limited.

BTW, this thread was very opportune for me as it prompted me to do a bit of dealer-hopping today looking for the elusive JD 70# cast iron wheel weights.

I got lucky, I found a pair on a shelf in the back room of a local dealer. I was wrong about one thing though, they're actually 75# ea.

Funny, I'm actually ecstatic over a couple of really heavy hunks of cast iron...:bannana:
 

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What did you have to give for them Sock?
 

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Glenn, they sold them to me at their cost (?) of $95 each. List was supposedly $130 ea. From what I've been able to find on the JD site, the cast ones have been super-ceded by the filled plastic ones. That could be wrong though and nobody knows for sure. But even if they can be ordered, the dealers I spoke with would want me to pay shipping on an order for any wheel weights. :rolleyes:

I was so glad just to find them that I happily paid the price. I wasn't going to go home and think it over 'cause with my luck, they'd be gone tomorrow even though they've sat there for what looks like years.

Once I picked one up I knew it and it's friend were going home in the back of my truck. ;)
 

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I've got a set of the Sears 55# plastic weights when I ordered my tractor, but I don't like them. They stick out too far and look dorky. I ran those with the stock turfs and chains the first year plowing snow. Last year I just ran chains on my loaded AT101's that weigh about 100# apiece and pushed far better.
I like the looks of the cast weights and even old used one's go for a good price (they usually don't ware out or break). But another 150# added to the wheels and with my fat butt on there also, that might be a little much. I would probably fold up the dozer blade or the frame.
 

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Old discarded disc brake rotors and some cement go along way to add weight too,without deflating your wallet..sometimes you can find rotors with the same lug pattern off Fords that can be installed behind the rim,using longer lug bolts,that wont stick out and catch on things too..I've seen guys double them up too,one inside behind the rim,and ,one outside it..
But chains might be the easiest and cheapest way out..
 
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