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Discussion Starter #41
You going to have water in or near the shed? I know a local farmer that has those faucets that the valve is deep in the ground right at the entry to his. He has a spraybar across the entry in a slit in the concrete and almost like a carwash as his equipment enters the building it cleans the undercarriage.
Other than electric I do not plan to put additional utilities in this shed. The water will be in the next building that will be next door to this one. The plans are for it to have a wash bay in it. At the moment the closest water hydrant is almost 150 ft away. Power will have to come from over 300 ft away (at least the trench will be that long since we have to go around the existing shop. Not sure if that will be a project for this year or next year...... Very budget dependent.

I am curious...why is the floor going in after the walls?...I live in an area that has not had farms for a while now, is that what is referred to as a "Pole Barn"...and by God ...that is as huge as a Barn
I've had a lot of folks ask me about why the building and then the concrete. In this case its an either or type deal. Since I contracted with Cleary to build the building it meant that if they did the concrete it was going to be an additional 15-20% on top of the actual cost. Meanwhile if I set it up myself I saved myself 15-20%.... or about $3,000.

The next building will be much more complicated since it will have in-floor heat and the floor will be varying thickness depending on the planned use etc. So the next one I am guessing will have the floor go in first. That means the next one will be with Morton or a local contractor who can do it all. Morton's cost control on finished buildings is much better than just shells. To build this one Morton wanted almost 40% more than Cleary! But to build an insulated shell the difference falls to about 30%, start adding more options and the difference keeps narrowing. Interesting thing I did not know before I started digging around.
 

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Pole shed floors are floating slabs, they have nothing to do with supporting the building. The poles are supported by concrete, either poured into sonotubes, the augered hole, or a precast pad is set into the hole for each wall post.
 

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I am curious...why is the floor going in after the walls?...I live in an area that has not had farms for a while now, is that what is referred to as a "Pole Barn"...and by God ...that is as huge as a Barn
I guess up here and maybe other places that would be referred to as a pole barn. I see the floors go in later a lot of the time. Seems a lot of people get the building, and then do the floor as cost and time allows. I see a lot of gravel put down inside of them. Concrete can be a big hit cost wise, and if your just using for storing stuff.... well gravel works and is a lot cheaper.
 

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With the next building...radiant heat in the floor...what fuel will you be using?...Will it be as big as this one?...It is a tremendous volume to heat
 

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Morton's cost control on finished buildings is much better than just shells. To build this one Morton wanted almost 40% more than Cleary! But to build an insulated shell the difference falls to about 30%, start adding more options and the difference keeps narrowing. Interesting thing I did not know before I started digging around.
I found the same to be true. My shed went up in 2007, my neighbor’s in 2012. Mine is on the right.
F355B884-9E97-427D-8B16-D81136837B61.jpeg
Both are 36x48. Mine has 14’ sidewalls, Ron’s are 16’. Mine has a 12x12 OH door, Ron’s is 14x14.
Bare shed erected cost was $18,000. If I would of gone with concrete, finished interior and electrical, it would of been $52,000.
Five years later, Ron put his up. Bare would of been $32,000 thru Morton. (mine was done by a local company, same warranty as Morton, 50 years) Ron elected to do it all at once, by Morton. They used a local contractor for the dirt and the concrete. His finished cost was $76,000. His has in-floor heat in 6 zones, including the apron. Considering steel price increases from ‘07-2012, that’s in the ballpark.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Big progress! The rest is up to me... grading, electrical, grates for

Started pouring the floor at 7am on Monday and came back today to prep the aprons and those were going in at 3 this afternoon. Extension joints have been cut in the shed (not pictured)...

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This weekend I will probably put some of the Deere round fenders in there so I can start the long process of organizing.

Lights are the first thing on the list. I’ll get those installed and then start working on the power situation. My newest toys are perfect for this..... nice big generators. (Hope to have those home in a few weeks.)

I guess up here and maybe other places that would be referred to as a pole barn. I see the floors go in later a lot of the time. Seems a lot of people get the building, and then do the floor as cost and time allows. I see a lot of gravel put down inside of them. Concrete can be a big hit cost wise, and if your just using for storing stuff.... well gravel works and is a lot cheaper.
I agree on the gravel. We’d have about $2,000 in gravel... the concrete bill will be close to $15,000.... eeekkkkkkk. If my intention was to not use this building for pallet racking I think gravel would be just fine. But the ultimate goal is to have a building I can run a forklift in. Even pneumatic tire units don’t like soft gravel floors. It would be referred to as a pole barn or equipment shed here... keeping in mind this is a “small” building for loc

With the next building...radiant heat in the floor...what fuel will you be using?...Will it be as big as this one?...It is a tremendous volume to heat
Yes, the next building will have floor heat. Many zones. Heating wise the next building will be as large or larger space to heat than the new one. Heat will be through LP. Here in the winter if you can keep concrete warm your energy cost decreases substantially. Something I learned the hard way our first winter. The current shop has LP heat and I was turning the heat on when I was out there... the shop alone went though almost 400 gallons of LP that first winter. The second winter I kept the shop at 45 degrees, no ice on the floor when it melted off the truck and we used a little less than 330 gallons of LP. This past winter at the advice of our HVAC tech we kept the shop at 55... which I thought was crazy, but it’s where the furnace is more efficient... I don’t have the last bill yet but we should be close to 330 gallons of LP. Keeping in mind the current shop is terribly inefficient (single pane windows, poorly insulated, and leaky).

I found the same to be true. My shed went up in 2007, my neighbor’s in 2012. Mine is on the right.
View attachment 2456405
Both are 36x48. Mine has 14’ sidewalls, Ron’s are 16’. Mine has a 12x12 OH door, Ron’s is 14x14.
Bare shed erected cost was $18,000. If I would of gone with concrete, finished interior and electrical, it would of been $52,000.
Five years later, Ron put his up. Bare would of been $32,000 thru Morton. (mine was done by a local company, same warranty as Morton, 50 years) Ron elected to do it all at once, by Morton. They used a local contractor for the dirt and the concrete. His finished cost was $76,000. His has in-floor heat in 6 zones, including the apron. Considering steel price increases from ‘07-2012, that’s in the ballpark.
Ohhhh heating aprons! Now that can get spend!!!!! Finished cost on this one will be right at $19.25/sqft, which I think is pretty reasonable. In a few years I’ll give them all another shot at winning the bid again. Haha
 
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Discussion Starter #50
Started working on the dirt work around the new shed. This is going to take me a while!!
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Kyle, not sure how I missed this! Great progress! Looks even bigger with the cement poured! Going to be a great home to the herd for sure!!
Thanks!
 
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Discussion Starter #51
Slowly making progress... this weekend a friend came by and we rented a mini excavator and ran conduit. Some if for this building and some is for later use.
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In the trench there are two 2.5 inch conduitA (right) and two 2 inch conduits (left). The right set rubs from the power meter to the new building. One conduit has a tracer wire on it. One of these will be used to run the wire for the 200 amp service we will be putting in the new building. The second was placed for the power service for the next building. The 2 inch conduit runs from the existing shop to the new building and will eventually contain an air line (since the new building is not heated) and one conduit for spare use (internet etc... since the current shop has internet).

All this makes for a full trench!
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This morning in prep for the new driveway I removed the sod going from the existing driveway to the apron that was poured. This will be finished either this evening or tomorrow.

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Our utility company here requires everything to be put in a 3" minimum conduit. I have helped pull 220 threw a 2" line.
Plan on using plenty of lubricant.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
Looks good. How about water and sewer lines? Are you going to have toilet and maybe a refrigerator with an ice maker? Power wash your tractors?
That type of infrastructure is not in the plan for this building. The only thing in the plan right now is the addition of a closer water hydrant in the yard..... However, that is at least a year away.

Our utility company here requires everything to be put in a 3" minimum conduit. I have helped pull 220 threw a 2" line.
Plan on using plenty of lubricant.
Correct, most power companies require 3" conduit to the meter. After the meter it is generally up to the building code in which ever municipality the building is being constructed in. I won't be doing the pulling of the wire, our electrician is doing the wiring and panel in the building. We spent a good amount of time discussing this plan a couple weeks ago. It is just significantly cheaper for me to install the conduit than the electrician.... plus I can route everything I need for the future and only have to dig up the yard once.
 

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Discussion Starter #55
More work done around the building. Got the drain lines for the future gutters run (figures I would do that while I had the excavator).

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Up next is starting on the electrical inside for lights etc.
 
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