My Tractor Forum banner

121 - 140 of 141 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,119 Posts
Discussion Starter #121
Man thats a friggin mess, at least to me anyway. On one thing it said MoJoMowerman replied to a post about riders a guy has but I couldnt find it and it said there are no new post in his profile yet so he prolly thinks Im a *** hole to. So let me say now if anyone has PM'd me I cant get them no doubt failure on my part.
I can barely manage a reply since all this has changed.
Well anyway friend that sounds good to me.
But about your'e question and I'll be brief as possible because Im sure most of the guys are tired of hearing it as they have many times.
I bought a 1966 L model 3 yrs ago to "re-do" and give to my son, well Ive been messin w/it for 3 yrs. and its pretty much done and very nice looking and seems to run good to....when I can get it started, its a pull-job and I cant do it anymore so I bot a 1/2 drill to start it with and it starts it sometimes but its about shot to or at least the chuck is. And I have some loose ends to tie up on it and cant start it while I need to do it with and faith of it starting.
Sooo a few weeks ago I ran into this L-8 that has the starter on it so I bought it for him ( son ) because its been so long now and I still dont have a tractor ready for him so Im gonna give him the L8 and I wanna keep the '66 L Ive been on for all this time for myself but I wanna put a starter on it, or I "must" put one on it if I wanna keep it.
This "starter clutch or sprocket" thats been the conversation for the last few days is on an old parts Gravely, and I asked jrd if I could just use it instead of buying a new one when I get a starter for my L and he proceeded to tell me what a pain in the butt it would be to remove it and use it. ( let me say it would be a pain to me not a mechanic like him, I know my limitations) and I then said 'if any of you want that thing its yours".
So thats where wer'e at and how we got there lol.
Here's some pics.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,119 Posts
Discussion Starter #122
OK #-1 os old starter clutch on parts tractor
#-2-#-3 #-4 is my 66' L
# 5 & 6 is the L8 I bought for son w/starter.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,119 Posts
Discussion Starter #123
I just wanted to show everyone this shade tree rig but wasnt about to start a discussion for it, but this strip of metal came off of my L when I bought it so I put it on the L8 but heck why not it serves a good purpose I think at least. Who cares what it looks like as long as it works and it does w/the rattling and movement and stuff.
I always thought it was pretty cool thats why I kept it for 3 yrs.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,447 Posts
how are you starting it with the starter clutch on it?
Little known fact: You can strap start an L model with a starter clutch. Just wrap the strap around the hub, and give it a pull like usual. That's apparently what they had in mind by putting that pin (which some people replace with a zerk) there. Obviously, you have to have the chain off for that trick. But it works.

I'm pretty sure the machine in Gerrard's picture is a parts unit, so he hasn't been starting it anyway.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,447 Posts
So let me say now if anyone has PM'd me I cant get them no doubt failure on my part.
I PM'ed you. In the upper right of the screen, you'll see a smallish square colored box with your initial in it. That box should have a green dot in it. The green dot signifies that you have alerts. One of the kinds of alerts is for PMs.

Click on the colored box, and you'll see a menu. One of the items is "Conversations". That's the new name for PMs. Click that, and you'll see your PMs.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,447 Posts
This "starter clutch or sprocket" thats been the conversation for the last few days is on an old parts Gravely, and I asked jrd if I could just use it instead of buying a new one when I get a starter for my L and he proceeded to tell me what a pain in the butt it would be to remove it and use it.
It's actually not that hard if you have the right tools. That's really what I was trying to point out.

The problem is that the T-head engine was never designed for an electric starter. That was grafted on later. The result is that the way the clutch spins on is very prone to over-tightening, because they had to connect it to a part of the crankshaft which was designed for a different purpose. Thus the need for tools and techniques to get it off.

I like the tool I made for that job. It's simple and effective. Using that modified chunk of angle iron and a big wrench, it's no more than a 5 minute job to get a clutch off, even if it's really stuck. But there are other techniques as well. The rope trick works. My experience has been that it takes an hour or so using the rope, mostly because it always took me a while to get enough rope in there, and then I had to horse around figuring out how to get a wrench on the flats. With the rope, you have only one choice about where the flats end up, and they're never pointing the right direction.

I've never tried an impact gun. You'd need a hardened socket with the right internal configuration. With one of those, I expect it would work. But I would feel a little queasy about whacking away at that crankshaft. I'd be afraid of knocking the flywheels out of alignment.

The one thing that generally won't work is to just stick a wrench on it and turn. You can spend all day on that, ******* yourself off and getting nowhere.

The overall point I was trying to make is it's a tricky job. Knowing what the issues are, and especially having tools to deal with them, is key to turning a tricky job into an easy job. Like so many things :)


The part I was cautioning you away from was pulling apart the starter clutch. That job is really tricky, and there's only so much to be done to make it tractable. You can use a small aircraft clamp, or a small ring compressor, to hold all the cams in place while reassembling. And you can use a hydraulic press to apply smooth straight pressure to the inner assembly, to avoid dinging things up with a hammer. But getting all the little cams inserted and pointing the right direction, without mashing the springs, requires patience and concentration. And you have to be willing to test it when partially assembled, to confirm that you got the directions right, and disassemble and try again if it's not working.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,614 Posts
I would not mess with the starter clutch. In fact, I'd leave the tractor as it is and build a mobile electric start cart if pulling it over is a problem. A couple guys in the club have done this and there was an article in the Gazette about the build a while back.

Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,741 Posts
I would not mess with the starter clutch. In fact, I'd leave the tractor as it is and build a mobile electric start cart if pulling it over is a problem. A couple guys in the club have done this and there was an article in the Gazette about the build a while back.

Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
Interesting. Mine ussually fires right off on the second pull when cold and the first hot. In fact it started on the first pull yesterday then dummy me chocked and flooded it.
I will see how this all goes with winter starts before messing with any mechanical start device.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,614 Posts
Interesting. Mine ussually fires right off on the second pull when cold and the first hot. In fact it started on the first pull yesterday then dummy me chocked and flooded it.
I will see how this all goes with winter starts before messing with any mechanical start device.
I just pull started a 1968 C8 on the first pull over the weekend. This was the first start of the season after being in winter storage since October. It had been drained of gas before putting it away. Just connected the plug wire, added fresh gas, opened the petcock, set the choke and throttle. Away she went.

Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,447 Posts
A well tuned L model will generally start with one or two pulls.

to me, the most annoying is starting a old-style (pre-case-vents) L in the dead of winter. You've got about 3 inches of cold oil congealed around the flywheels in the bottom of the case. That'll test your ability to pull that strap :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,741 Posts
A well tuned L model will generally start with one or two pulls.

to me, the most annoying is starting a old-style (pre-case-vents) L in the dead of winter. You've got about 3 inches of cold oil congealed around the flywheels in the bottom of the case. That'll test your ability to pull that strap :)
I am think about parking it over a heat lamp this winter. Should be like a summer start.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,447 Posts
I am think about parking it over a heat lamp this winter. Should be like a summer start.
+1

When I have a strap start gravely that I want to use in the winter, I stick a 60 watt bulb (incandescent please! no LEDs!) under the case and throw a blanket over it. That does wonders.

I figure one of these days they'll succeed in banning incandescent bulbs. I've got a stash of about 5 cases of 60 and 100 watt old-tech ones in my barn.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,119 Posts
Discussion Starter #133
Well there is little if no evidence that mine is well tuned, and if I could start it when I want / need to I could adjust some stuff.
This is my first go-round with anything but running them when they belonged to my bosses or uncles and the like. When I grew up everyone had a Gravely but I just ran them and didnt work on them.
The first pull I gave it pert-near ripped my fingers off and I said " heck with this, if thats the first time I better get a new plan".
All this is about is getting my son his first Gravely and he's a father now as of 5 weeks ago so he'll be staying home working in his yard and he likes doing it because he has a beautifull bamboo forrest that goes all the way to his river bank, and he started it with one stick of it 8 or so yrs. ago but I let the conversation drift to the one I WAS working on wich was my fault.
Here is my problem now and its got me so mad I have went inside twice because of it.
The L-8 I bought for him I am trying to fix the PTO in-out mechanism ( done forgot the crazy names) so the deck is off of it and for the life of me I dont know why I un-did the handle bars but it keeps getting rained on so I wanna hook the h-bars up so I can move it.
Well one worked just fine but the one on the left will not line-up for love nor money and it is driving me nuts!!! I have used punches to line it up to get bolt into hit it with a hammer, loostened a bracket and nothing is working and its the simplest thing!
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,119 Posts
Discussion Starter #134
At least my new Backwoodsman magazine came in today lol.
Man I love them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
425 Posts
I have a theory about your current problem. I checked the recent replies and thought to myself, why is he doing all this with the PTO again? With a machine in such good condition, why would the shipper shaft be in need of cleaning? So I went back to read your description of the trouble you were having with it and I think it's possible that you were led down the wrong path.

In an early post all you said was you couldn't get the blade to stop spinning, not that you couldn't get the PTO lever to move forward (to the disengaged position). I guess no one caught that but on the m106, when you disengage the PTO, the momentum of the blade keeps it spinning seemingly forever before it stops, especially with the thick brush blade. My theory is that you expected it to stop spinning within a relatively short time period of disengaging the remote PTO lever. You may very well get this all put back together and go to shut off the deck and see that the blade seems to keep spinning just like before.

I hope this isn't the case since you've done all this work already and that would mean it's all for naught. Now if you say that no, it wasn't that you "couldn't get the blade to stop spinning", it was that the lever wouldn't move forward and you know this for a fact, then never mind all this. I just wanted to put this out there to make absolutely sure that you knew that when you disengage the PTO with that deck, the blade just keeps going and going and going and going before eventually coming to a stop.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,119 Posts
Discussion Starter #136
Im on my way to work evesnova74 but that is some interesting stuff but I honestly think yhe rod would not go back to disengage and thats mainly because I couldnt get that shipper shaft ( or that ear thing that hooks on to end of rod and to PTO engager/disengager ( they got some messed up names on these parts in question) to move by hand, but I cant remember why I unhooked the handle bars. Will have to go there when I get home tonight.
Thanks a lot and thats some important info to know.
Mark
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,447 Posts
Well one worked just fine but the one on the left will not line-up for love nor money and it is driving me nuts!!! I have used punches to line it up to get bolt into hit it with a hammer, loostened a bracket and nothing is working and its the simplest thing!
Please don't hit it with a hammer! All you'll do is ruin the bolt and the threads in the casting.

Handlebar alignment can be annoying, because there's stuff at the top which is pushing on it. It sounds like that's the situation you have.

One way to manage it is to loosen/remove the top mounting bolt, ie the one which goes through the bracket into the fan shroud. That releives some of the pressure on the bar, and makes it easier to get that bottom bolt in. In your case, that may not be a hot idea. Given that when you launch into one of these things, you often get tangled up in sidecar issues, you're maybe better off leaving that one alone.

I have two other suggestions

1. Get a woodworking clamp (like a 24" bar clamp) and set it up so that you can clamp across the advance casting. Use your lineup pin to get the bottom hole in the bar lined up with the hole in the advance casting. Get the clamp on there, either butting up against the bottom of the bar, or if you have room to leave the hole exposed, clamping the bottom of the bar in place. Then stick the bolt in.

2. Remove the top tin (the one with the hole in it for the spark plug). Be careful when removing the head bolts, if they don't come out with a small amount of pressure, stop. Don't break them off. Use a piece of wood (like a 1x3) to gently pry between the jug and the shroud. You probably need to pull the shroud back about 1/4" to 1/2". Just enough to get the bottom of the bar to line up so you can get your bolt in.

Take your time. It's a simple mechanical device. Just take it a step at a time and you'll be fine.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,614 Posts
The whole rig is simply flexing under tension. I'd loosen the bolts on the top end of the handlebar and perhaps the corresponding bolt on the other side of the casting. Get your bolt started and then snug them all down, but dont overdo it.

If necessary, get a helper to hold it in position while you thread the bolt.

Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,119 Posts
Discussion Starter #140
Little known fact: You can strap start an L model with a starter clutch. Just wrap the strap around the hub, and give it a pull like usual. That's apparently what they had in mind by putting that pin (which some people replace with a zerk) there. Obviously, you have to have the chain off for that trick. But it works.

I'm pretty sure the machine in Gerrard's picture is a parts unit, so he hasn't been starting it anyway.
Definitly
 
121 - 140 of 141 Posts
Top