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Hello all! Just thought I'd introduce myself since I have been evesdropping on the forum for a few months now. I have been looking for an older "tank" to purchase for my 2.5 acres yard for some time now. After looking at some older JD's in the 700-1000 dollar range, I found a older couple selling a Ingy 446, not sure of the year but I'm thinking it's an '83. Runs good, with a bit of smoke when I going up an incline (any thoughts?) the only other issue I found is that the steering is a bit funky, it turns right without a problem (perhaps a little to far) but only turns left about 1/2 as far as I imagine it should. The final issue is that the mower deck 48" dies out under any kind of serious load (wet or thick grass) and the belt will start slipping causing it smoke.

I love this thing and despite those two issues I couldn't pass her up $400.

Any thoughts on the engine on the smoking issue?
Belt size, where to get one or how to tighten the one I have?
I think I got the steering figured out I just need to get underneath and tinker.


Thanks for any advice!

~Paul
 

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elcome to the forum. Glad you joined us.
 

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Paul it sounds like a simple clutch adjustment for the blade stalling thing. Blue smoke could be a sign of a tired engine, but could be nursed back to health as well.

Joel
 

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Paul,

It sounds like you found yourself a good deal and made a sound choice. The first thing you should do is locate your tractor PIN number then go to the Ingersoll web site and download the parts manual for the tractor, mower deck and any other attachments you may have. These will be very helpful in seeing what parts you have and how they go together plus it will make it easy to order the exact parts you may need. You should also purchase an owners manual from a dealer, they are not very expensive and will give you good tips on operation and maintenance.

You may also want to join the case group on yahoo, http://tinyurl.com/cgyncm, and review the files section for a lot of additional information including mower deck belt size/number. When properly installed and adjusted your mower deck will not bog down in anything so you need to take a close look to determine whether the belt is slipping or the clutch is slipping--in either case a little adjustment should solve the problem. The large Tee handle on the front of the mower mounting bracket is for adjusting the belt tension--counterclockwise tightens it and you should tighten it until the tensioning spring on the lower left size of the mule drive should have approximately 1/8" space between the coils. If the spring is overstretched or broken it will need to be replaced. You might also want to remove the belt cover on the deck and clean out all the crude that is most likely in there and make sure that the tensioning pulley is moving freely.

To determine the cause of the engine smoking you'll have to do some tests-- a leakdown test would be a good first start or at least a compression test to see if your rings are worn.
 

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:congrats: and enjoy it. slkpk
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Paul,

It sounds like you found yourself a good deal and made a sound choice. The first thing you should do is locate your tractor PIN number then go to the Ingersoll web site and download the parts manual for the tractor, mower deck and any other attachments you may have. These will be very helpful in seeing what parts you have and how they go together plus it will make it easy to order the exact parts you may need. You should also purchase an owners manual from a dealer, they are not very expensive and will give you good tips on operation and maintenance.

You may also want to join the case group on yahoo, http://tinyurl.com/cgyncm, and review the files section for a lot of additional information including mower deck belt size/number. When properly installed and adjusted your mower deck will not bog down in anything so you need to take a close look to determine whether the belt is slipping or the clutch is slipping--in either case a little adjustment should solve the problem. The large Tee handle on the front of the mower mounting bracket is for adjusting the belt tension--counterclockwise tightens it and you should tighten it until the tensioning spring on the lower left size of the mule drive should have approximately 1/8" space between the coils. If the spring is overstretched or broken it will need to be replaced. You might also want to remove the belt cover on the deck and clean out all the crude that is most likely in there and make sure that the tensioning pulley is moving freely.

To determine the cause of the engine smoking you'll have to do some tests-- a leakdown test would be a good first start or at least a compression test to see if your rings are worn.
Thanks for the advice on the belt!
I am confident in working on things but don't have the knowledge I'd like for this. So excuse me if I sound dense :fing20: here but... How would one go about performing a "leakdown" or compression test?

The old man I bought it from, **** of a nice guy by the way, told me that one of the plugs would foul out from time to time (I'm guessing this is from a bad seal and could be related to the smoking issue).

This thing is an absolute beauty and I really want to learn to take proper care of her so I can one day pass her down to my soon to be first born son!
 

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I found a older couple selling a Ingy 446, not sure of the year but I'm thinking it's an '83.

Get the serial number off of the ID plate and then use the chart at the top of this message list to determine the year of your tractor.

Runs good, with a bit of smoke when I going up an incline (any thoughts?)

All too often, these tractors get badly neglected. The fact that many of them are still is service is a tribute to the quality of materials and components used to build them. Since you have no real history on this tractor, it is wise to spend some preventative maintenance money right now to stave off expensive problems. If you don't know how to adjust the valves, de-carbonize the combustion chamber, clean the cooling fins, clean the float bowl, install new points, condensor, spark plugs, high-tension wires and check all bolts for tightness, then either learn or pass this off to someone who does.

A bit of smoke isn't a big deal. What colour is the smoke? White, blue or black?

the only other issue I found is that the steering is a bit funky, it turns right without a problem (perhaps a little to far) but only turns left about 1/2 as far as I imagine it should.

One of the first things you absolutely NEED is the correct Operator's Manual for the serial number and model of your tractor. That manual will tell you how to adjust the steering, where all the grease fittings are, what the service intervals are for various items, how to control the tractor on steep grades, along with a lot of other information. Brian Hildreth is an Ingersoll dealer and posts at this site. Contact him off-list and get a manual put in the mail ASAP.

The final issue is that the mower deck 48" dies out under any kind of serious load (wet or thick grass) and the belt will start slipping causing it smoke.
Belts slip for several reasons. A badly worn belt, glazed pulleys, improper belt tension and bearings that are starting to seize can be factors.

Brian can sell you a new OEM belt. If your tension spring is sacked out, he can supply one of those. You need to check the two idler pulleys the deck belt runs past to make sure they are rotating easily and smoothly. You should drop the deck, open the top cover, remove the belt and then check each blade spindle for ease of rotation, absence of bearing noise, absence of any side play and a smooth feeling when spun. Check the belt idler pulley for the same issues and make sure the bracket that holds the idler pulley will move back and forth on its pivot easily. These are prone to seizing up.

The belt tensioning spring should not be all stretched. Buy the deck Operator's Manual so that you know HOW to set your deck up for optimal operation. Inspect the deck belt for fraying or cracking. Buy a new OEM belt if you see signs of problems. Look over the mounting harness. Is it bent? Are there any broken welds? Are the mounting holes all ovalled out? How about the tension T-handle on the front of the deck mounting bracket? Is it straight? Does it turn easily?

I love this thing and despite those two issues I couldn't pass her up $400.

OK, essentially you stole the tractor so you shouldn't even blink when it comes to spending some bucks on it. After all, a new one is pushing ten grand so taking good care of this $400.00 diamond-in-the-rough is a smart move.

I think I got the steering figured out I just need to get underneath and tinker.

GET THE MANUAL FIRST so you know what you're doing.


Thanks for any advice!

My advice is to immediately change all the fluids in your tractor and to put an hourmeter on it so you can properly monitor your service. If your tractor has an hourmeter, then make sure it's working. Also, create a SERVICE LOG either in your computor or in a binder. Record the date you do ANYTHING to the tractor along with the HOURS. If you replace a part, log what you replaced. Save all invoices in a file folder and make a reference in the log book to that invoice. Don't rely on your memory because everyone's memory sucks. Write it down.

~Paul


Your tractor is apparently 26 years old. It will have issues due to the wear and tear over that time-frame but none of them will be all that daunting or serious to overcome. For instance, if you check all four rod ends on the steering and find play in them, then buy new ones from McMaster-Carr and put that issue behind you for a long, long time. And, as already suggested, go the the Ingersoll site and print out the correct parts catalogue so you can study it. That book will do more to explain how your tractor comes apart and goes back together than we can give you on this forum.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ok, a few pieces of info.

The previous owner was the orginial owner (but he couldn't remember the date of puchase). I will check the model # when I get home today. I have the original owners manual for the machine. One piece of information. Beyond the fact that this was stored indoors and the fluids were checked and replaced as needed (this guy was definately maticulous). He also has a lawn that is the size of a postage stamp and flat as can be. I can't imagine too much "wear & tear" on this beast from his 1/4 acre suburban development lawn... I don't think that prior to my owning it, it has ever been taken out of low range. The smoke I was getting from the engine was blue and started happening after about 2 1/2 hours of mowing, the last 1/2 hour of which I was stretching the ol' girls legs in high range. Thanks for all the info I'll keep you all updated on my progress.

PS
Where could I find "seafoam"?
Would a new air filter be difficult to obtain?
 

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NAPA carries Seafoam and they may have your air filter as well. NAPA is more than an automobile parts suppier. They have a huge catalogue filled with parts for Outdoor Power Equipment.

If you lucked into a super, low-hour machine for $400.00, then you got an even better deal than most people get. However, while some owners do have the Operator's Manual for OPE items they own, all too many of them never even open them up and read them. Right now, you have no idea what the previous owner used for engine oil. You don't know if he ever added oil to the hydraulic system, changed the oil in the hydraulic system or what he used for oil if he did either of those things. The same holds true for the trans-axle.

Oil is the cheapest and easiest component for YOU to change. Fresh, CORRECT fluids are what protects your tractor from accelerated wear. It's either..... change the fluids in a timely manner or start changing expensive components. Unless the PO gave you a maintenance log that outlines what he did and what he used, then you're *** U MING that he did everything right.

Owners with small yards can be a problem. Engines need to run long enough and hot enough to burn off some of the nasty stuff that occurs in the crankcase. You came here looking for advice because you have no experience with these tractors. The advice is FREE. Whether you choose to use it or ignore it is totally up to you. After all, it's your money that will be spent on repairs, not mine.:trink39:
 
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