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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all from Ohio. I recently acquired a Colt 2712 and I want to fix it up. I found this sight and I'm hoping to get some help. :thanku:
 

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Welcome fletchman, nice to have you aboard here and best wishes in your information quest :fing32:.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the welcome! Here are some pics of it's fist day home.



 

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Now that is really nice, really nice shape, and its got the optional hydraulic lift - that is a rare option on those, is that mid blade homemade or is there a name on it?

Keep us posted on your progress and don't for get to take pics along the way. :thThumbsU
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'll have to check on the blade, but it looks pretty good to be homemade. For now I just want to get it operating. I'm planning on putting a 15hp Tecumseh on it for the time being. I eventually want to get the proper 12hp Tecumseh, a new seat, paint and decals and a snow blade. It came with a real nice mower, but I doubt I'll ever use it or the grader. I may try to sell/trade them for what I need.

Here's a few more pics of the dirty. Please let me know if something is wrong or missing. I have the side shrouds not installed in the pics. I know the seat isn't original also. I'm thinking that the front tires are not correct. It came with an owners manual and it states that they are supposed to be 4.80X8 and they are 6.50X8.







 

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First off, welcome to the forum and :MTF_wel2:

As CM2 already pointed out, you have a very nice and rather unique Colt so I'm :praying: that your intentions are honorable with this treasure.

This tractor deserves a meticulous, ground-up restoration to bring it back to what it looked like when it left the Winneconne plant back in 1966. Someone has messed with this tractor in the past but fortunately, all of that is easily reversible.


If you do it right, your Colt will end up looking like this.



You must take great care when trying to remove that steering wheel because it isn't available from any source that I'm aware of. The use of a carefully positioned puller plus soaking the shaft with PB Blaster for a week in advance is recommended.

The missing center cap for the steering wheel and the correct seat pan plus cushions can be bought from Steve Guider in Ohio. His number is (937) 363-3523. Steve may be able to help you with the correct 12 hp Tec motor as well as the clutch and metal cooling fan.

I know that he will be quite interested in some photos of your tractor due to the fact that you have the hydraulic lift on it. I've never seen a Colt with that option previously although I just saw a 190 Case with it on e-Bay.

A free parts manual can be had by going to the Ingersoll website

http://www.ingersolltractors.com

Decals can be bought from Tony Giletto

http://maplehunterdecalstexas.com/

The true and correct paint color for the wheels and hood is called Flambeau Red and is available from Van Sickle as their stock #458.

http://www.vansicklepaint.com/

The white is a bit trickier. Colt describes it as a "blue/white" as opposed to a yellow/white or white/white or red/white. I can't give you a paint code for it and I don't think that Steve can either. I don't see any reason why you could not use the Case Power White paint for your tractor but when you chat with Steve, he can advise you on that since he's also used that color. Use of an enamel hardener is highly recommended.

As for the front rims and tires, those are correct. Once again, you have a tractor with this added option, along with the rear hitch and the hydraulic lift. Surprisingly, the tractor did not come with the optional rear hydraulic PTO/Flow Control valve but I guess that the first owner had no intention of running a rototiller.

The belly blade is 100% home-made. Someone has welded that up and added a chunk of cutting edge from a large FEL bucket to act as the actual blade.

While you haven't asked for THIS advice, I'm going to give it anyway. Your Colt is a piece of history at this point and it should be preserved. It is now well beyond it's "best before date" as a work tractor. While it is your machine to do with as you see fit, you need to understand that the old Colts and Case 100 series did have their problems and parts are getting harder and harder to come by since 44 years have passed by.

Axle shafts and the motor input shaft are particularly prone to failure. The frames have been known to develop cracking just in front of the trans-axle and the front axles have also been known to develop stress cracks. All of these issues are due more to the hard use these tractors were capable of withstanding back in the day but time does take its toll. I am suggesting that you take your joy from restoring the tractor initially and then add to that joy by putting it in parades and taking it to tractor shows in your area rather than putting this tractor back to work.

Get rid of the belly blade but leave the rear hitch. If the deck is in good condition, then you might consider showing the tractor with it on. The problem with owning one Colt is that it often leads to a second and then a third and so on. Consider yourself warned. :biglaugh::biglaugh::biglaugh:
 

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WOW man nice tractor. Seriously, I am in northern KY and would love to someday see the thing in person. If you do it right, that thing is going to be a showstopper.
You have come to the right place because this forum is full of folks who know a LOT about these machines.

Please keep us updated, would love to see your progress.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Thank you for the detailed information. I'm not going to work this tractor hard for sure as I realize how important it is to preserve it. I envisioned it as a snow plower for my driveway and pull my kids around with the trailer. I don't think that would be too much. I wasn't going to restore it until I realized that someone had already re-painted it at one time. I like the original un-touched look to tractors if they are original.

We have a "Corn Festival" in my hometown where I plan on showing it. The number you posted for Steve looks like a local number for me. Wouldn't it be ironic if Steve lives close by? :) I'm wondering if he goes to the Corn Festival here in Wilmington, OH.

My front end does have a stress crack. I'm a certified welder so that's not a problem. The front axle where it pivots is worn pretty good also it seems. There is a lot of slop when turning the steering wheel. The axle rocks forward and backward. I plan on taking it apart and seeing how it can be repaired. The rear hitch has been welded solid in a couple places, so I have to fix that as well.

Everything else seems good on it. I'll just have to get it running to see if the hydros work, but I don't see why it wouldn't.

I wasn't aware that the front tires were an option. That's good to know. I would have put the wrong tires on it. The serial number is 663004. I don't know how that can be traced down, but it may or may not help with something. I feel like I have found a little treasure and I can't wait to share what I've learned about it to others.
 

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Thank you for the detailed information. I'm not going to work this tractor hard for sure as I realize how important it is to preserve it. I envisioned it as a snow plower for my driveway and pull my kids around with the trailer. I don't think that would be too much.

The axle shafts and motor input shaft fail by twisting off due to procedures that require high amounts of torque. Mowing your lawn or pulling you kids in a trailer are low torque uses but pushing snow or plowing a garden can often be high torque situations.

I wasn't going to restore it until I realized that someone had already re-painted it at one time. I like the original un-touched look to tractors if they are original.

There were 4 models of Colt in 1966. You have the one that came with 16" rear rubber and a 12 HP engine. The one in the photo is a 2510 that came with 15" rear tires and a 10 hp Tec. The 2310 was fitted with 12" rear rims and a 10 hp Tec and as did the 2110 but it had a Peerless manual transmission in it instead of the Hydra-Drive (formerly called Colt-A-Matic). 1966 was the final year Colts were made.

We have a "Corn Festival" in my hometown where I plan on showing it. The number you posted for Steve looks like a local number for me. Wouldn't it be ironic if Steve lives close by? :) I'm wondering if he goes to the Corn Festival here in Wilmington, OH.

Steve lives 80 miles north of you and it's a one hour and 45 minute trip that would be well worth your while. Steve's collection of old Case and Colt tractors is one of the best in the country if not the very best. He now has the ONLY Case 190 forklift known to still exist.


My front end does have a stress crack. I'm a certified welder so that's not a problem. The front axle where it pivots is worn pretty good also it seems. There is a lot of slop when turning the steering wheel. The axle rocks forward and backward. I plan on taking it apart and seeing how it can be repaired.

The axles are cast steel and not difficult to repair. I suggest that you bore out the pivot hole and bush it back to stock with either a steel or bronze insert.

The rear hitch has been welded solid in a couple places, so I have to fix that as well.

Everything else seems good on it. I'll just have to get it running to see if the hydros work, but I don't see why it wouldn't.

Actually, the term "hydros" doesn't apply. These tractors are hydraulic drive, not hydrostatic drive ....which is what makes them unique. Pumps and motors are still available and can be sourced for reasonable prices if needed. You will need to empty the trans-axle of whatever might be in there at the moment. If you go to the Ingersoll site and download the parts book, you will see that there is a pick-up screen for the hydraulic system inside the trans-axle. Remove the steel suction line and then use a deep socket to remove the suction screen for cleaning. If there is a lot of foreign matter inside the trans-axle, then flush it clean with diesel fuel. Once clean, soak up the remaining diesel with some old rags.

Refill the trans-axle with 10 quarts of #30W motor oil. Shell's Rotella T is a good choice. If you are intending to use the tractor in the winter months, then use 15W40 Rotella.

I wasn't aware that the front tires were an option. That's good to know. I would have put the wrong tires on it. The serial number is 663004. I don't know how that can be traced down, but it may or may not help with something.

Unfortunately, Case apparently kept no records of the serial numbers of the tractors they made prior to 1972 and that includes the Colts. Steve will want your serial number to give to Jim Daenzer so he can add your tractor to his registry.

I feel like I have found a little treasure and I can't wait to share what I've learned about it to others.
Yes Sir... it is a little treasure and one that I'd love to own myself. Work closely with Steve and you will end up with something you will be proud to own and perhaps pass down to one of your children.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the advise. I'll be sure to clean out the transaxle and I'll take it easy on the tractor.

Any tips on where to advertise my mower deck and grader blade for sale? I don't want to just throw the blade on ebay or craigslist. There's probably some Colt/Case guys out there looking for a deck and may even have parts to trade.

I was trying to figure out the rear hitch. How is it supposed to move up and down? There's no lever.
 

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The greatest exposure for those items will come from an e-Bay listing. Craig'slist offers local exposure.

I can't begin to predict what the market might be for either item no matter where you list them. There just aren't that many guys out there who have Colts and want either item you have because they usually show these tractors without a deck and since the belly blade is not an OEM item, they wouldn't show their tractor with that on either.

The deck should fit the 120/150/190 Case tractors and possibly with a small modification it would work on the 155/195 models as well. There is a place here on MTF for classified ads that you could try. Call Steve Guider. He may know of someone in need of a deck or even that blade. It's a start.


As I said before, your tractor is fitted with the optional hydraulic implement lift that I wasn't even aware was available in 1966 because it does not show up in the parts manuals until the 155/195 models were out. I suspect that there was some sort of a "lift link bar" that connected the hitch to the hydraulic implement lift but you don't have it. In the early years, Case relied upon Brinly-Hardy to make sleeve hitches for them. When the 200/400 series tractors were produced, Case moved quickly to engineer their own 3 pt CAT 0 hitch plus their own sleeve hitch. Those sleeve hitches all came with a removable lift link bar to connect them to either the manual lift or the hydraulic lift.

I think that if you carefully examine the hitch you have, you will find a short arm welded onto the right side of it with a hole in the end or perhaps a pin sticking out. It's just a guess on my part but once again, a chat with Steve might clear that issue up for you very quickly because he's seen quite a few Colts over the years he's been collecting. He may have some factory literature on the hitch that he would photocopy for you.
 

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fletchman919:MTF_wel2:glad to have you aboard.
That's going to be some nice 2712 when you get it restored.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Call Steve Guider. He may know of someone in need of a deck or even that blade. It's a start.
I'll definitely ask Steve about it when I call him. I want to get all of my ducks in a row so I can lay a bunch of questions on him at once. :p I don't want to hound the fella every couple of days with something new. Does he happen to have a website?

As I said before, your tractor is fitted with the optional hydraulic implement lift that I wasn't even aware was available in 1966 because it does not show up in the parts manuals until the 155/195 models were out. I suspect that there was some sort of a "lift link bar" that connected the hitch to the hydraulic implement lift but you don't have it. In the early years, Case relied upon Brinly-Hardy to make sleeve hitches for them. When the 200/400 series tractors were produced, Case moved quickly to engineer their own 3 pt CAT 0 hitch plus their own sleeve hitch. Those sleeve hitches all came with a removable lift link bar to connect them to either the manual lift or the hydraulic lift.

I think that if you carefully examine the hitch you have, you will find a short arm welded onto the right side of it with a hole in the end or perhaps a pin sticking out. It's just a guess on my part but once again, a chat with Steve might clear that issue up for you very quickly because he's seen quite a few Colts over the years he's been collecting. He may have some factory literature on the hitch that he would photocopy for you.
I was thinking that it was supposed to be hooked up to the hydraulics but I wasn't sure. Thanks again for the lesson.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The Kohler engine that used to be on it has a clutch type thing on the front driveshaft (this shaft is on the flywheel side of the engine). I removed the fan blade, but how does the clutch come off? Can I just pull it off with a puller or is there a clip holding it on that I didn't see? Also I'm wondering if this "driveshaft" is indeed part of the crankshaft or bolted on.

I guess I should have first asked if there was a parts diagram on the net for me to print off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)

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For a parts illustration go to www.ingersolltractors.com, the shaft your talking about is a bolt on to the flywheel. I have not taken one of these apart in a while but I believe there is a spring type clip similar to a snap ring that holds it together.

That column I believe is pricey, I know that Jim Daenzer frowns on columns as not being very good, but I believe you should be able to rebuild yours much cheaper than what he's asking.

As for value its hard to say some collectors may pay handsomely for a rare model, but Steve is the guy to ask and may be interested in it himself.
 

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I think that I should clear up a couple things for you. First of all, your 2712 came originally with Tecumseh HH-120 engine, not a Kohler. If you have a Kohler that was given to you at the time of purchase, then that is the wrong engine for this tractor. You would totally spoil the restoration by installing that engine.

I say the above because all the information known to me tells me that I'm correct. However, experience has also taught me that strange things did occur inside the Winneconne plant from time to time. Hopefully, this Kohler you have still has its original ID plate on it with all the numbers such as model, spec and serial. IF so, then what are they? The reason I ask is because I believe that your tractor was one of the last few Colts ever made and there is the remote possibility that the plant ran out of Tec engines and decided to install a Kohler 301 that was originally destined for a tractor that was supposed to leave the plant as a Case 190.

On another issue, I hope that there is no expectation on your part of ever making some sort of profit on this restoration because if that is even part of your motivation here, then do yourself a favor and sell the tractor now. As CM2 and others will tell you, restoration is done by enthusiasts out of love and respect for the brand/s they choose. Rarely does anyone come close to breaking even on their out-of-pocket expenses let alone receiving a dime for their labor.

When it comes to the value of your Colt after the restoration has been completed, that is totally up in the air. Most collectors prefer to conduct their own restoration work and won't pay a premium for a tractor that has been restored. Part of that comes from the pride one feels as a result of saving a tractor like the one you have, from almost certain destruction. I tell you this now because I want you to go into this project with your eyes wide open and not with some preconceived notion that there is a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.

Moving now to the steering column you saw on e-Bay. This Seller doesn't quite understand the hobby. I know who he is because I had conversations with him on another forum. He's probably done a top-notch effort to rebuild that column and now expects to be compensated for the parts and labor he put into it. In my opinion....fat chance. He made a mistake in just painting it because no matter who might want that column, they will end up repainting it again even if they are restoring a 1965 Colt.

These columns were used in Case, Colt, Cubs and a few other brands back in the day. Parts are not difficult to obtain and once again, Steve can guide you (pun intended) as to local sources for the bearings and seals.

As for the front-mounted mechanical PTO clutch, Case used 4 different models so since you don't have what I believe to be the correct engine, I can't advise you on how to dismantle it. What I can confirm is what CM2 said. There is a main shaft that is secured to the flywheel with countersunk cap screws and the actual clutch unit is installed after this shaft is put onto the engine.

That said, the first order of business is to determine the year of manufacture and the hp of this mystery engine you have. For all either of us know, that engine could be from a tractor that was made ten years after your Colt was.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Thanks for the lesson. I'd like to clarify that I do not intend on selling my tractor. I like it and I want to restore it to it's original condition in time. I am not in a big hurry though. I want to get it up and running before I try to track down all of the original parts that it's missing (mostly the engine). I plan on mounting an easier to find engine just to get it moving. Once I know that everything works, I'll try to track down all of the parts I need and begin the restoration. I thought the steering column was over priced and wanted to see if I was correct. My steering column is fine.

The Kohler engine is indeed not the original engine but it does have the original clutch and other parts from the original Tecumseh that I need to remove. The engine that I have is a K241 10hp Kohler which came on some of the smaller Case models from what I have researched. It needs to be rebuilt and it is missing a few parts or I would just use it for the time being.

I have an old Wisconsin 9.2 hp engine that I'd like to use, but the shaft is a little too large in diameter for the hub half to swallow which connects to the hydraulic pump. Unless there is a way to rig something up, I'm going to have to find another engine to work with.

If anyone knows off hand where an original Tecumseh is, please let me know. I also need the fan which is missing from my Kohler.

Thanks for the help.
 
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