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Discussion Starter #21
I want to thank everyone who has responded to my questions. The responses have been amazing and helpful. I will get some pics posted soon.
 

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Old Tractor Enthusiest
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Just FYI - On many/most BX SCUTs the aux circuit/fuse above the rear top link is on the same electric circuit that controls the fuel shutoff solenoid. If that fuse blows, the ignition switch alone will not turn off the engine. With a blown fuse, the only way to turn off the engine is to rotate the manual fuel shutoff valve on the side of the fuel injector body.

There's a trick that many BX owners use as a backup. That is to run a stiff wire through the front grill and to the manual shutoff lever. That way if the aux circuit fuse does blow there's a backup option to shut off the engine.
 

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Sounds like kind of a bass ackwards design. I would design it so that it would only open the fuel shutoff solenoid and allow the engine to run if the electric was on, not if the fuse was blown so that the circuit wasn't getting any voltage.
 

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Sounds like kind of a bass ackwards design. I would design it so that it would only open the fuel shutoff solenoid and allow the engine to run if the electric was on, not if the fuse was blown so that the circuit wasn't getting any voltage.
Hi Nouveau - Good to hear from you. Hope all is well. Fully agree on the bass ackwards design for the fuel shutoff solenoid. Maybe Kubota changed things on the newer models. Can't remember where I got the idea for the "emergency shutoff wire" but it was from someone here. Had to use it a couple of times a few years ago when I overloaded the achy circuit.
When I eventually built the cab for my BX23 I ran a dedicated +12 for the lights and other add-ons and returned the accy circuit to it's original state (no extra load). One other upgrade I did along the way that helped a lot was replace the original generator with the alternator upgrade. Highly recommended for members with older BXs with the OEM generator.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Ok, this is good info. Now, I need someone to draw out a circuit for me showing how I might wire 2 work lights on my ROPS, 2 work lights on the rear of the tractor for backing up and 2 work lights on my OTC cab that is only used in winter. I intend to wire the cab lights directly to the battery. But I'm unsure how to approach the other permanent work lights.
 

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I'd suggest just tapping into the +12 terminal on your battery and run the positive electrical source from there. Install a fuse inline and then pickup ground about anyplace on the BX.

FWIW, I installed LED flood lights all around on my home-built cab. Two in front, two on the rear, and one on either side pointing towards the front corners. They are all switched individually and do a decent job.

Before I made the cab, I had LEDs on the underside of the ROPS bar - two pointing front and two to the rear. Used the ROPS bar for electrical ground. Worked ok but got tired of getting cold and wet plowing. So I built the cab several years ago and am very happy with the results. The roof and frame stay on year around. The windshield, doors and other side panels can be put on or taken off in about 15 mins. Has heat too.

Here's a video of my winter setup with wing plow. Shows all the lights and gives some idea of the flood pattern of the LEDs.


The LEDs are from the "Online-LED-Store.com" Nice lights for a reasonable price. They run sales often.

 

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Discussion Starter #27
I'd suggest just tapping into the +12 terminal on your battery and run the positive electrical source from there. Install a fuse inline and then pickup ground about anyplace on the BX.

FWIW, I installed LED flood lights all around on my home-built cab. Two in front, two on the rear, and one on either side pointing towards the front corners. They are all switched individually and do a decent job.

Before I made the cab, I had LEDs on the underside of the ROPS bar - two pointing front and two to the rear. Used the ROPS bar for electrical ground. Worked ok but got tired of getting cold and wet plowing. So I built the cab several years ago and am very happy with the results. The roof and frame stay on year around. The windshield, doors and other side panels can be put on or taken off in about 15 mins. Has heat too.

Here's a video of my winter setup with wing plow. Shows all the lights and gives some idea of the flood pattern of the LEDs.


The LEDs are from the "Online-LED-Store.com" Nice lights for a reasonable price. They run sales often.

That sounds like good advise. Where did you mount your switches and did you put a relay in the circuit? That's a great looking cab. I wish I had the talent to build something like that. But, it's just not in the cards.
 

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That sounds like good advise. Where did you mount your switches and did you put a relay in the circuit? That's a great looking cab. I wish I had the talent to build something like that. But, it's just not in the cards.
Mounted the switches inside the cab under the roof to one side. Made up a little overhead console to accommodate all the switches and fuses. Didn't install a relay. Just a main fuse and then used a separate fuse for the windshield wiper motor. Have the following switches on the console:
Main/Master on/off toggle
Front Flood Lights "
Side Flood Lights "
Rear Flood Lights "
Windshield Wiper on/off toggle
Windshield Wiper - Momentary switch - bump it one time and the wiper cycle one time
Roof mounted yellow strobe - toggle

The flashing LEDs mounted under the overhang of the roof at the front and back are powered/controlled separately.

As for the cab, don't cut yourself short. The Curtis Cabs for the BX are are really nice. But out of a matter of principle I couldn't justify the $4000+ expense. So I built my own. Looked at several other home built cabs online and learned from what others had done. What is not obvious is the cab is tapered from front to back 3 degrees on each side. So the cab is about 3" narrower at the rear compared to the front bulkhead. The front width was determined by the deck pan where you put your feet. The width of the rear was determined by the inside width/clearance of the ROPS bar. It's also not obvious, but the ROPS bar can be folded down with the roof on - a must to get the BX inside my shop which only has a normal height garage door. Have an extra tall garage door on the garage where I normally park the BX. To get the dimensions right to provide maximum inside space with enough clearance to fold the ROPS bar took a fair bit of measuring and some trial and error with templates, but anyone could do it.
The roof is 3/8" exterior grade plywood bent over an internal spar arrangement (the spars are angled 3 degrees on each end to support the taper). All the wood is covered in 2 coats of spar urethane. The roof is covered on top in 1/16" aluminum diamond plate for water proofing and durability from tree branches etc. The main frame that attaches to the BX is all aluminum angle. I've had it on about 5 years now w/o any problems. Still plenty of room to rotate the seat around when using the backhoe.
The only time the roof has been off since I installed it was when I had to remove the ROPS bar, deck pan and fenders to gain access to the fuel tank - had to replace the fuel level sending unit. That was a pain in the neck, but everything went back together ok - and it worked.
So again, don't cut yourself short on a home-built cab. Just takes some patience and a little fore-thought. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Mounted the switches inside the cab under the roof to one side. Made up a little overhead console to accommodate all the switches and fuses. Didn't install a relay. Just a main fuse and then used a separate fuse for the windshield wiper motor. Have the following switches on the console:
Main/Master on/off toggle
Front Flood Lights "
Side Flood Lights "
Rear Flood Lights "
Windshield Wiper on/off toggle
Windshield Wiper - Momentary switch - bump it one time and the wiper cycle one time
Roof mounted yellow strobe - toggle

The flashing LEDs mounted under the overhang of the roof at the front and back are powered/controlled separately.

As for the cab, don't cut yourself short. The Curtis Cabs for the BX are are really nice. But out of a matter of principle I couldn't justify the $4000+ expense. So I built my own. Looked at several other home built cabs online and learned from what others had done. What is not obvious is the cab is tapered from front to back 3 degrees on each side. So the cab is about 3" narrower at the rear compared to the front bulkhead. The front width was determined by the deck pan where you put your feet. The width of the rear was determined by the inside width/clearance of the ROPS bar. It's also not obvious, but the ROPS bar can be folded down with the roof on - a must to get the BX inside my shop which only has a normal height garage door. Have an extra tall garage door on the garage where I normally park the BX. To get the dimensions right to provide maximum inside space with enough clearance to fold the ROPS bar took a fair bit of measuring and some trial and error with templates, but anyone could do it.
The roof is 3/8" exterior grade plywood bent over an internal spar arrangement (the spars are angled 3 degrees on each end to support the taper). All the wood is covered in 2 coats of spar urethane. The roof is covered on top in 1/16" aluminum diamond plate for water proofing and durability from tree branches etc. The main frame that attaches to the BX is all aluminum angle. I've had it on about 5 years now w/o any problems. Still plenty of room to rotate the seat around when using the backhoe.
The only time the roof has been off since I installed it was when I had to remove the ROPS bar, deck pan and fenders to gain access to the fuel tank - had to replace the fuel level sending unit. That was a pain in the neck, but everything went back together ok - and it worked.
So again, don't cut yourself short on a home-built cab. Just takes some patience and a little fore-thought. Hope this helps.
RDM
That's great information. I'll start with the lights, probably next week. Being retired, I have the time to tinker with and figure out the cab. If I choose to move forward with it, I will certainly share my experiences with you and the Forum. Thanks for your input.
 

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RDM
That's great information. I'll start with the lights, probably next week. Being retired, I have the time to tinker with and figure out the cab. If I choose to move forward with it, I will certainly share my experiences with you and the Forum. Thanks for your input.
You're very welcome. If you do mount the lights on the ROPS bar, give thought to running the +12 inside the bar. It makes for a much cleaner installation. I did the same on the ROPS bar on my BX23, pre-cab. Drilled a hole on the inside base of the ROPS bar and fished the +12 wire up through the inside of the bar. Drilled a small hole near the lights on the top of the bar too. Used rubber grommets at the holes to protect against sharp edges creating a short on the +12 wire. The ROPS bar itself provides plenty of ground for the -12 side of the DC circuit.

Suggest mounting the lights on the underside the ROPS bar. That way tree branches won't catch on the lights.

If you do give thought on a cab, you may want to check out the other thread here on the Kubota SCUT forum. I posted some pictures of the cab construction during the project. Happy to answer any questions too when the time comes. There's some things I would probably do differently if I were to do it over again.

Merry Christmas to you and your family, plus everyone out there on this wonderful forum. Learned a lot here over the years. Cheers, Rob
 

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Sounds like kind of a bass ackwards design. I would design it so that it would only open the fuel shutoff solenoid and allow the engine to run if the electric was on, not if the fuse was blown so that the circuit wasn't getting any voltage.
It’s not backwards to me. I want the machine to run no matter what. A diesel doesn’t need any electrical power. In the old days, not that old really, 70’s, they didn’t have a electric cutoff valve. When you turned the key off they kept running. You always manually shut them down on the fuel pump.


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yes, even with a full bucket of dirt, it feels well balanced and drives well, it make the overall package much more useful. I think those using wheel weights and loaded tires are missing out on performance. And only takes a min to disconnect for grass cutting.

It’s big, but it is the correct box for the BX. It has a sticker on that says for BX load with 300 lbs, for B load with 400lbs”



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