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After to batteries went dead im wondering about the 2 wires that come off flywheel were they should be connected to. Im not sure if both have a charge and one is a ground.
It's on an Ariens 1542 mower with an engine off a MTD, Lawnman.
 

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IF you go to the B&S site, you probably can find an illustration of your charging system. The most common with that engine is two wires coming from under the flywheel to a double plug. One wire will have a "fat" place in it just ahead of the connector. This will be the diode changing AC to DC to charge the battery. Wire should run from it to the power terminal on the ignition switch OR it may and can run directly to the battery cable terminal on the starter solenoid. The other wire is likely AC to run the head lights. IF your set up is something different, check back or check the B&S site.

To see if diode in the one wire is good, check with meter or test light. There should be continuity in one direction but not when you reverse leads. IF there is continuity in both directions OR no continuity in either direction, diode is bad.

Walt Conner
 

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Bolens G16YT aka 2016G
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To see if diode in the one wire is good, check with meter or test light. There should be continuity in one direction but not when you reverse leads. IF there is continuity in both directions OR no continuity in either direction, diode is bad.

Walt Conner
This is good info. Could you take it a step or two further past "check with meter". I have a multi-meter, but don't know how to use or read it beyond checking my battery for DC Volts.

Remember, you are taliking to an electrical numb-nut$...:thanku:
 

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Your meter probably has a diode check function. It will have an odd looking symbol like a triangle with a line or two through it. Select that function, and put one lead on each end of the diode. You should get either an overrange indication ( like 1---------) or a number close to .617. The first means no continuity, the second means there is some current going through the diode. Now reverse the leads, and you should get the other reading. If you get
the overrange both ways, the diode is open (no good), or if you get a small number both ways, the diode is shorted.
One end of the diode should not be connected to anything to test it, so pull the wire or connector off whichever end is easier.

A little hint - in the resistance function of your meter, with the leads not touching each other, you should get the overrange indication, since there is no connection between the leads. When you touch the leads together, the meter should show close to zero resistance, because the leads are connected. You should perform this test each time you use the meter, both to test the leads and the meter itself.

In testing the diode, which is just a one-way valve, one direction should show no "connection", the other way should show some flow, but not a dead short.

I hope this helps!
 

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Bolens G16YT aka 2016G
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Is this along the line of what you are explaining?

Is the diode on the engine or along the circuit?

I know that under the flywheel is the alternator. B&S sent me the type that is with pics and information. Along side the flywheel, I believe is the solinoid.
Both the alternator and solinoid have wires attached to them.

Are any of these "doides".
 

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Pretty much, but your diode will not look like that. Those are very heavy duty diodes in those pictures, mounted in a heat sink. Your diode(s) will probably just look like small lumps in the wiring. They are probably covered with heat shrink tubing. The diodes themselves probably look like tiny cylinders with a lead coming from each end. They may only be 1/8" to 1/4" long, maybe 1/10" in diameter.
The article you reference is a good one, but pretty specific for a battery charger. Your setup is much more basic, but the same principles apply.
The paragraph on testing is good. The numerical figures given depend on the type of diode, but the important thing is that you show "a measurable resistance value" in one direction, and an open circuit the other way.
Their meter shows 00.0 flashing to indicate an open circuit. I've never seen that, but meters vary. The open circuit indication on your meter will be as I said - in the resistance function with the leads not connected together. It may be 00.0, or 1------, or whatever. As long as you know how your meter shows it. Touching the leads together should give you close to zero, perhaps a few tenths, or one or two ohms.
If you have a self-powered test light, that's an easy way to test. With the leads one way, the light should light, and the other way, the light should not light.
 
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