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Discussion Starter #1
Me and my wife moved from the city and bought a 50 acre farm (35 workable) in Ontario.
I got a tractor last week, but that's about it so far.. (75 at the PTO)
I have been thinking of growing potatoes, sweet potatoes and maybe another veggie like carrots, but I'm not sure what kind of equipment i'm going to need ? or if this is the way to go !
Is growing wheat and/or grains easier/smarter that vegetables ? Can anyone please tell me what is the best things to grow and what kind of equipment I need that would work with my 75 PTO HP tractor ? I know the land around here has lots of stones, so I need a disk plow to turn the soil, I assume that the disk plows and till - Thanks....(trying to figure it all out...)
 

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Citizen of Earth
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My suggestion is head to the library and check out a couple of books on self suffeciency, and small scale farming to familiarize yourself with the tools you will need for different kinds of farming. What you plant depends on what your plans for the crop is. Are you going to sell it to a local market? Sell it privately at your own stand? Sell it to a broker or agent? I'd get the soil tested to see what you have to work with as far as nutrients and PH, and look at crops that would require the least changes ($$$) to your soil to grow. As to tools you need, you need a way to prepare the soil prior to planting, a way to plant, a way to prevent weeds (culitvation and /or chemicals) and a way to harvest. Some of these tools are cheap, and some are expensive, and again it depends on what you are growing. I have a co-worker that is using 35 plus year old equipment to farm about 60 acres in northern PA. His equipment much smaller than modern stuff, slower than modern stuff, but is all paid for. Old stuff is usually cheap, but you have to be willing to fix breakdowns, chase parts, or make your own repairs as you go. And it's hard work. So getting back to the beginning of my post, do some reading before going out and spending money on tools and equipment.
 

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Father to Triplets + 1
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Wow, ok. Call the county extension office! I would type that in all caps, but people think you are yelling when you do that. I'm not yelling, but seriously, call the county extension office (oops, just noticed you are in Canada, do you have extensions? If not maybe call a US neighbor). You aren't the first to buy a farm and not know whats going on, you just got a lot of catch up to do. In fact if your ground is not ready to plant, you may just want to call this season a scratch, plant a good cover crop, and spend some time studying. Remember people (not everyone) go to college to learn how to farm. Do you guys have 4-h up there? County Ag shows and these types of events may be a good place to meet local farmers, they can help tremendously if you can make some friends. If small scale is where you want to be for now, a good primer would be Carla Emerys Encyclopedia of Country living. Just go ahead and buy it cause you will need most of the chapters often enough. She covers about everything and what she can't tell you she gives references for. An Ag equipment dealer, while expensive, can show you what you need and how to set it up. Good luck and keep us posted.
 

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Lots of stones, eh?......Sounds like you live in my area.......lol

welcome to the forum....Sorry, can't help with the crops. I have enough trouble just with a garden.
 

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Make sure you that know how to safely operate your tractor and machinery. If you have a farming neighbor, perhaps see if he could help you. Another source of information is to read the owners manual(s) for your equipment. A lot of people get seriously hurt or killed on tractors every year, because they figure a slow moving machine could never get out of control. Hopefully your tractor has a ROP and seat belt.

Farming is consistently one of the top 10 most dangerous occupations.

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/1731660/10_most_dangerous_occupations.html?cat=11


Another thing to consider regarding what corps to grow is to target who your customers would be. Are you growing corps for market or for personal use? Visit your local farmers markets and see which produce is selling well and at what prices. To be profitable, you have to target your customers, time your corps, and plan out your planting months in advance. There are a few different free publications on the web for Market gardening that may be of benefit to you.

here is one example:
http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/marketgardening.html
 

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Make sure you that know how to safely operate your tractor and machinery. If you have a farming neighbor, perhaps see if he could help you. Another source of information is to read the owners manual(s) for your equipment. A lot of people get seriously hurt or killed on tractors every year, because they figure a slow moving machine could never get out of control. Hopefully your tractor has a ROP and seat belt.

Farming is consistently one of the top 10 most dangerous occupations.

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/1731660/10_most_dangerous_occupations.html?cat=11


Another thing to consider regarding what corps to grow is to target who your customers would be. Are you growing corps for market or for personal use? Visit your local farmers markets and see which produce is selling well and at what prices. To be profitable, you have to target your customers, time your corps, and plan out your planting months in advance. There are a few different free publications on the web for Market gardening that may be of benefit to you.

here is one example:
http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/marketgardening.html
How is the market for corps these days LOL
 

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Have you thought about planting it to trees and becoming a tree farmer? Contact the Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources in Halifax (Phone 902-424-6295) and inquire into their Woodlot Management Home Study Course. Tree farming has its advantages and disadvantages, just like everything else.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
WOW...Thanks for all the great advice :)

Have and will use your great advice, thanks again....Steven
 
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