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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all, so I was hooking up the backhoe and I smashed a hydraulic line by accident and I'll have to replace it, it looks like. It got caught up in between the backhoe and the tractor as I was lifting it with the rockshaft. I got this from my dad, and when I read the manual it says to route the hoses through some channels in the frame after unpacking it, which would prevent this from happening. He never did that and just used it with the hoses loose. I really don't understand why they don't just ship it that way in the first place. The instructions state to remove the 90 degree quick connect fittings, route the hoses, then reattach the fittings. I was planning on doing this very soon, no time like the present I guess.

So my question - first of all, the other side of the hose is very hard to get to inside the backhoe frame. Second of all, I'm not sure where the best place to remove it would be.

Here is the damage:



And if I lower the stabilizer bar I can see the other side of the hose underneath the valve body here:



Before tackling this and making things worse or working way harder than I need to, I thought I'd ask the best way to disconnect this. Just unscrew the first fitting there, with a wrench on both sides? I assume the entire hose will have to rotate, it's routed through the rest of the frame and out the back but I'm sure that's doable. Then same for installation? What kind of thread sealant is used? I've only ever dealt with pneumatic or household plumbing tapered threads.

Thanks in advance.
 

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That joint nut will turn. The hose need not turn. NO sealant
 

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At least one end of the hose will have a flare type fitting that will spin freely without the hose going with it...make sure you have the bucket on the ground before you unscrew it or you might get a bath
 

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While the fabric hose loom and the rubber abrasion cover on the hose itself are damaged, the wire braiding that does the actual work of withstanding pressure appears to be undamaged. If the wires aren't broken, I'd use it as is until such time as it does leak (could be years down the road).

Both ends of the hose should have swivel fittings for ease of removal. If you decide to change it out, take the hose to a hydraulic shop and they will make a new hose for you with the correct terminations (fittings), probably while you wait.
 

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I use and recommend Locktite 545 for pipe thread hydraulic fittings. LOCTITE 545

It looks like that is what you have. But, there are MANY different choices for hydraulic fittings and they seal in different ways. Pipe thread fittings actually deform the threads to seal, which makes resealing a joint harder. I have always had good luck with locktite products and recently bought some 545 for a hydraulic project. I don't do enough pipe fittings to be good at it. I had 4 on the recent job for skid steer style quick connects. I used 545 and had no leaks. This weekend I had to reverse the connections and needed to remake two of the connections. It was hard to break apart the connection, much harder than I remember tightening them. Putting it back together was easy enough and once again no leaks. They do recommend letting it sit for 24 hours before pressurizing. I let it sit overnight, because it was pretty cold. It probably was not at full strength, but it held fine with no leaks.

The stuff is expensive $12 for a very small amount, but it only takes a little per joint and I still have a lot left over.

If you buy your hose locally, be prepared for sticker shock. Also be prepared for limited selection on hoses. My local place only had 2 wire and 4 wire hose, which would have been okay if it was the good stuff, but it was the stuff that is very stiff with a large bend radius. That looks like at least a 1/2 hose, which are even stiffer than the 1/4 hose I needed.

Surplus Center has decent hose for really good prices, but limited selection in ends and lengths. If you need many hoses and know your le
 

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Discussion Starter #7
While the fabric hose loom and the rubber abrasion cover on the hose itself are damaged, the wire braiding that does the actual work of withstanding pressure appears to be undamaged. If the wires aren't broken, I'd use it as is until such time as it does leak (could be years down the road).

Both ends of the hose should have swivel fittings for ease of removal. If you decide to change it out, take the hose to a hydraulic shop and they will make a new hose for you with the correct terminations (fittings), probably while you wait.
Yeah, I considered that. The hose has quite a crimp to it as well, you can see about an inch above the tear. If it does have some life left in it I'd be willing to use it as is, but I was afraid of it blowing while in use.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
That joint nut will turn. The hose need not turn. NO sealant
At least one end of the hose will have a flare type fitting that will spin freely without the hose going with it...make sure you have the bucket on the ground before you unscrew it or you might get a bath
Oh, the nut on the left spins? Of course, a flare fitting makes sense. Are all of the hydraulic fittings flares?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you! Very helpful. What is the difference between 1 and 2 wire?
 

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Either 1 or 2 wire braiding...what you see where the rubber has worn away... that is the strength and contains the pressure...the rubber is just a coating and does not prevent leaks
 

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To add to Mark's reply, the term 1 or 2 wire is misleading. It applies to the number of layers of braided wire. 1 wire hose has 1 layer of braided steel wire, 2 wire has 2 layers. The number of layers, as well as the size, determine the pressure rating of the hose. Click on Mark's previous link for a visual ! Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Got it. So, if I decided to use this hose as is, should I just hook it up and see if it leaks? Is there a risk of it blowing later?
 

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Here is some information on hoses: Hydraulic Hoses
2-wire and 4-wire are broad categories. There are variants that allow from smaller bend radius, ie they are more flexible. Depending on the size (interior passage) the difference in bend radius can be quite significant.

If the braid is not damaged, it should be fine. But, without the rubber cover, it will rust and is more susceptible to damage. Call your local auto parts place that does hoses and see how much they want for a replacement. It looks like you have a 1/2" hose with 1/2" NPT male connections. They should be able to give you a ball park price over the phone. Then you can decide if you want to pay that, or wait till it fails, or buy one online.
 
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