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Professional Homeowner
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7,416 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A few years back I bought a 5’ brush hog to keep some property I figured we’d end up with cut down. I ran it once or twice on my old 9N. I didn’t realize how rusted out the sheet metal really is when I bought it. Flash forward to now, and I have a much more capable, powerful, and user friendly Kubota L4610.

With the Ford, all I could really do was keep the open areas in check. Everything that was completely overgrown was a lost cause... I just couldn’t get in there. Too tight between standing dead trees, too many logs I couldn’t see, and too much mature autumn olive (a crazy fast growing woody invasive weed).

I found that with the loader and fork equipped live hydraulic and hydrostatic Kubota, I can wiggle in pretty much anywhere, bad news for the front of the tractor, even with brush guard and loader to kick down high shrubs and move logs out of the way. Better not risk a radiator or anything else expensive on the tractor.

Last weekend I learned I can see into the dense undergrowth since there aren’t any leaves on the poison oak, ivy, thorns, grapevine, etc. I also discovered that by shortening the top link, I can raise the hog a little higher than normal.

So now what I do is raise the hog, back into the overgrown undergrowth, and lower that sucker down. Many of the logs are kind of rotten and are turned to mush/dust when hit. Some are pretty firm and don’t go out without a fight.

So far, I broke one tail light housing (not the new one thankfully), and might have given the grill and sheet metal another bruise or two... not a huge deal.

I don’t really care about the hog because it’s so rusty, old, undersized, and cheap. I don’t really feel like dealing with this thorny poison crap one stalk at a time, then deal with all the saplings that were literally choked to death by the vines. So far, I’ve ripped a big hole in the top by the gear box mount, bent the tail wheel frame, and today ripped off part of the stump jumpers by lowering the hog onto a stump and pulling away.

When this pasture is cleared out to my liking, maybe i’ll look into a 6 or 7’ better brush hog. Until then, it’s Nice having a welder, scrap steel, and a couple backyard farm boy self taught welding skills.
 

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Long Time Thread Stalker
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314 Posts
Forgot to mention- when the steel bent, a blade caught it and stopped the machine dead. Boy did that make an ugly noise!
I can only imagine. No shear bolts or slip clutch? Kind or like the time we were in charge of cleaning up the neighbors fenceline, and got a half buried 18” field stone wedged between the blade and body of the cutter. Squelching, sqealing, and then silence....
 

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Premium Member
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3,519 Posts
Poor hog had a bad day. Vibes for you both.
 

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Super Moderator
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29,017 Posts
I always hated when I'd catch something with the brush hog and stall the tractor! Most of the time the swinging blades don't let that happen but every once in a while!! Glad nothing really bad happened!
 

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Professional Homeowner
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7,416 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Slip clutches are not real expensive.

Comparatively.

Or was splitting the tractor so much fun you want to do it again?
I suppose I should probably ask for some info on slip clutches then...
Honestly I figured there would be one built into the hog somehow. I’ll break shear bolts all the time if I were to run them. There is a shear bolt in the drive shaft that never broke. It’s grade 5, but maybe being a 1/2” bolt makes it non-shear.
 

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Long Time Thread Stalker
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314 Posts
Ok,
is The shearbolt at the joint where the pto shaft connects to the gearbox? We always use grade 2 1/2” bolts
 

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Professional Homeowner
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7,416 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Ok,
is The shearbolt at the joint where the pto shaft connects to the gearbox? We always use grade 2 1/2” bolts
Yup. That’s the critter. 3 marks on the head indicates grade 5.

I’m betting with what i’m attempting, though, I’d go through a frustrating amount of replacement bolts. I’m kind of leaning toward a slip clutch, since I also run a snowblower with this machine, and will probably get a better brush hog some day. Slip clutch on the PTO, I imagine is similar to an overrun clutch in that it just pins on in line with the PTO?
 
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