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Everything is a mess these days.

I'm still waiting for a order after 2 solid weeks from a shop just 200 Km up North. It's not even the mailman's fault, it's actually the sellers. They don't even bother to answer any emails or to at least send a message that everything is delayed or will take some time to process.
 

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I feel your pain!

I did the grocery shopping online thing at Walmart the other day, ordered on Thursday pickup between 7:00 - 8:00PM on Friday.
They were to e-mail me when my order was ready. I sat here watching a video waiting for the e-mail & lost track of time. Then when I checked my e-mail it was 7:54!!!!
I jumped in the car and got there within 5 minutes, the pickup area was dark, just looked like an empty parking lot, no doors open and no one around. There was a sign that said to call a number and the order would be brought out. Great, except I don't have a phone.
Left the car running and went inside, the greeter told me to go in and find a person in a yellow vest and talk to them. I looked and there were only workers in blue vests, everyone wearing a mask but me and other shoppers. So I told the first blue vested worker I was trying to pickup my order & she said follow her. So she walks up to the greeter who I asked initially and I notice his yellow vest, she talks to him and he calls someone to assist me then tells me to drive back to the pickup area. Finally the guy brings out my order. I told him I didn't have a phone so I couldn't call the number but I thought someone would be there to assist me. He looked at me sort of funny and said they were not supposed to bring orders out after 8:00, something to do with security. I gave a look of gratitude and made small talk about him giving an extra effort which he appreciated and said that it was the only way to succeed there. He was a happy worker, he was getting some overtime in while bagging my goods. Just the worker & I in a big empty parking lot, enjoying the cool breeze as the darkness fell around us.
Strange world now just getting the essentials.
Next time I'll be there early. LOL!!

Don

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At least he was nice Don. Some will just give you bad attitude and won't move a finger to help you.

I Hope that's not Tumac; I just ordered from them!
It was from a electronics shop.

The Tumak deal on my part, was just bad timing and bad luck. The guy was very apologetic over the phone and explained the situation which I fully understood. The only thing they could've done better was just to reply to the emails.

If you've been waiting for a long time, maybe they're just waiting to receive the goods so they can finally ship to you.

They have some cool prices though. I can't beat a 1,80€ per tine for the tiller anywhere near me.
 

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I ordered some link balls; 1/2 the price compared to my local shop, who are ok for most things.
Terrible on other things.
Ebay has some cheap, but when you add the postage there's no fun left.
Anyway, I suppose it will all get here eventually.

I'm only changing the lower links; what do you think of quick hitch top links? Seems to me the usefulness would be marginal but the price is a bit high.
Especially for the FEL, I'd have to pull the top cylinder apart and modify it to attach the quick hitch.
 

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The balls I use are 44 mm in diameter, which is not that common. Once I managed to find them through a German Ebay seller but as you said, the postage kills the deal completely. It was like 30€ and the balls was 4 or 5 € a piece.

On the top link, yes it's nice to have but personally I can't quite justify the cost of it. Between unlatching the hook or just take the pin out, it isn't that much of a difference in time. Both style needs the pressure on the top link to be relieved.

The bottom ones, yes, it's worth every penny. Makes life a lot easier. You don't have to fight the lift arms to get it in place. They work better with telescopic stabilizers though, as it keeps them from moving side to side when backing up to the implement.

Oh, and don't expect any tracking info on them. The parts will simply show up on your place with no previous warning.
 

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Got the branch logger all painted up and assembled.

Finally we had a couple of hours without rain, so we took it out to chop some branches. Got carried away, again...... and it's now back in the shop, about half way disassembled. :)

Threw a branch a bit too thick to the chopper and broke the chain or so I thought. After a close look, not only it bent the 35 mm shaft, it also twisted the shaft. Some amazing forces going on and the shear bolt on the PTO shaft never broke.

The chain also jammed against the tensioner and bent the slightly but it's still good.

Anyways, managed to barely straighten the shaft a little bit using heat and the hydraulic press. At least got it straight enough that it won't require massive welding to fill it up and machined again. And I might do something else to it to prevent further damage in the future, since apparently I can't control myself. :ROFLMAO:

IMG_20200514_120259.jpg
IMG_20200514_120323.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #6,348
Well, those are nice pictures,
but you know us, we want pictures of the carnage!!!
Sooo, let's get busy!!
Me?
I'm out playing with the timing components.
Up to torquing down the cam sprockets.
Then oil pan& new oil pump.
Pictures to follow.
No carnage here, I hope!!
:p
Don

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Ouch!
This is the problem with inventing things, you have to do all the R+D, fix the mistakes, and when you finally get it right [if you're so lucky and talented] then you just have the one machine.
Factories do the same work, then sell thousands.

I'm in the same situation with the hedgecutter. It was working great, then it seized up, to much force between the teeth caused the sliding surfaces to start grinding on each other.

Back to the shop.
If the grinding paste ever gets here.

Suggestion; use a ridiculously under strength shear pin, aluminum or something. see what it takes to fail, then use something slightly stronger, and work your way upwards to your desired torque / shear point.
 

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Discussion Starter #6,350 (Edited)
If we didn't have the challenges, we'd be bored and mopey.

Pictures do not do this pump justice, it's a thing of beauty. Well, if you like shiny aluminum.
Notice the sockets in back to get an idea of the scale of this thing.

2457339


Bad lighting, but Oh well.
The innards.

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If those are the innards, these are the guts.

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The gears were dry, I pulled them out and gave them a coating of Vaseline, then some 10w30 synthetic. There was no way that pump was going in dry. With the oil passage as large as it is there is no telling how long or even if it could finally prime it's self. I'll pour as much down the filter port as it will take just prior to turning it over. Fortunately, the filter drops into a reservoir of maybe 6 - 8 oz.
I'm still waiting for the gaskets, they spent the night going back and forth from one UPS location & then back to the first. Then I found out the full head gasket set ships from Jacksonville Florida, it was one of those open box finds for half price and includes head bolts for about 10 bucks more than the valve cover gasket. I didn't scrape the old gasket off of the valve cover & it's rubber so it will work for now hopefully without leaking oil all over the spark plugs.

I do have some doubts as to when this engine last ran, the way it looked under the valve cover I'd have guessed over a year. The head/cams/rockers were more chocolate than the oil pan. More chocolate, naw, everything was brown with some rust thrown in. That was worrisome. . . .

2457342



Without the baffle

2457343


At least I'm not waiting for a gasket for the oil pan, just RTV.

Don

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sexy looking part there, Don!
What happened to the old pump?
I once had an oil pump fail.Lucky I saw the oil light come on and killed the ignition right away.
I went to the dealer to order another and they didn't believe me at first.
Really, the gear is in 3 pieces I insisted... pretty rare.
 

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Yeah, must have been some thick oil to do that!

I just consider it a standard practice when I do any repair work on an engine, other than a water pump replacement or fuel issues.
For the small price of the oil pump it's cheap insurance, less for me to worry about, one less "what if" should it blow up afterwards. It can help performance, helps noise and longevity of bearings, lifters, rockers etc.

Don

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It's like changing the rear main seal when installing a new clutch.

It's one of those things will beat you rear end afterwards.

Sorry. No pictures of the carnage. It's was hard to see on the pictures anyways. The only obvious thing was the broken chain.

Oh and I also found some broken welds on the dual mass flywheel. I welded both parts to lock them together with some nickel rods since it's cast iron.

Anyways, got the shaft build with weld, turned back to round and straight again. Now I'm working on the torque limiter.
 

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Discussion Starter #6,354
Cool.
We can do without the carnage pictures.
Surprised you were able to save the shaft, then again you can do anything you set your mind too.
Rear seal replace always a good idea.

How to build a hydraulic pump.
It's like art work.


Don

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Well, it took years to figure it out, but at last my 25 year old electric
2457497
pressure cleaner is working at full power again.

The problem; lies!!!
The spec plate said 15 lpm max.
That was the clue; max? it's electric, runs at 1 speed, how can there be max?
Took it apart and measured the bore + stroke, checked the motor rpm for good measure, theoretically it will flow 13lpm. Actual measure is 12 lpm, with or without pressure.
So all it needed was a smaller nozzle.
Measured the current at full power; 8A, which works out to 6HP real.
 

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Yaaaa!! I'm glad mystery solved.
After all that time, you rationalize thru the numbers (math never lies) that it was neglect of maintenance that created the problem.
I know nothing about those pumps, although I did briefly considering building a pressure washer but soon forgot about it. Looking at the price of the dozens of pumps listed and their varying capacities I decided it must be rocket science or I needed more of an interest in a washer in order to do the research.
You on the other hand continued for many years to pursue the issue and came out with the definitive answer to the mystery. Congratulations for your stick-to-it-tivness and knowledge gained and shared with us, for humanity's benefit.

Can you explain what the three valve looking compartments of the pump do and how they do it?
It seems they too along with bore and stroke would influence the output, or so it would seem.
Like I said I know nothing about those pumps, just curious.

Don

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Positive displacement pump forces water through an orifice. They should be call high velocity cleaners since it's the speed of the water that does the work.
As the volume is fixed by pump capacity and RPM, the back pressure is a product of the orifice [aka "nozzle" in HPW speak] size.
So when pressure drops, it has to be one or the other. Due to the lies, I assumed my problem was low volume.
The company that sold mine died decades ago. I found the pump manufacturer for seals and check valves.
Big ones like this, 5+HP, are quite useful. with hot water fed in, they degrease wonderfully without added chemicals.
200 bar [2,700 psi] will strip light rust.
And paint too if it's not well stuck. And concrete.

Most people use gasoline engines for bigger ones like this, since electric needs 3-phase. So you can compensate for the sort of problem I had by speeding up the motor.

Little electric ones are popular, they make a little buzzing noise and are useful for just about nothing. A good garden hose will do as much work.

I have another one in Amsterdam that also doesn't work right, similar but different, also with a pump without info plate.
I'm going to get my guy there to take the head off the pump and mail it to me so I can sort it out.
Without the rest of the machine I won't be able to test it but these things are heavy.
I need full power for prepping boats for painting. Sanding 200m2 takes too long, so now I just blast the dirt and loose paint off before rolling more on top.

Shipyards use real monsters to strip off mussels and grime from hulls. It takes 6-8 hours for them to blast my larger boat. Those things are 20 or more HP.

One time I saw a 250hp one, it was powered by a turbodiesel engine. It would clean steel bright and etched with just water. And cut right through of it was too thin. They called that thing 'hydrojet', shipyard said it was too expensive for them, sometimes they contracted the thing with operator.
Hydrojet even takes of thick rust scale.
We have to hammer it with a handheld needle air hammer.
I do the waterline on my boat myself, sometimes it takes 10 hours or more, and that HURTS.
 

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More cool stuff, guys! I'm not doing anything cool. That was a very nice hydraulic pump that feller made. In one of my former lives, I did maintenance in a grocery bag manufacturing plant. I was their electronics guy, but it was classified as a multi-kraft shop, so we were expected to be able to do most anything. I did electrical, plumbing, pneumatics, hydraulics, machining, mechanical repair, welding, fabricating. I even did a little designing. Some of the larger bags were sealed with hot melt glue. A gear type positive displacement pump pumped the glue via a chain drive from the bag machine. There was several heaters that heated the sump, pump, hose and nozzle. You couldn't work on the thing unless it was at 350 to 400 degrees F. If the nozzle heater quit, it would blow the hose apart. Fun stuff! I really enjoyed that job. I only live a mile away and got lots of "call ins" which paid 4 hours pay of 1 1/2 times the time you were there. I got really good at troubleshooting those machines and carried a lot of the common replacement parts in my big roll around tool box. If a supervisor saw me there and wanted me to fix something else, it would count as a second call in. There were times I would get in and out in an hour or so and have 2 to 3 call ins under my belt. When we worked nights, we were responsible for keeping all the machines running. If there were no problems, we worked on "government" projects. That's what we called building stuff for ourselves. I hadn't been there long when my current wife and I got married. Real rings were too expensive so I made stainless steel wedding bands for us. After they were polished, people thought they were white gold.
 

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There's Joe.
Was wondering where you went.
That was the perfect job for you to let your creative side have some room to exercise.
Callout pay was a good thing too! I enjoyed callouts, never knew where I'd end up, the ones at 3:00AM were so much better than the ones at 6:00pm, when I was finally home and relaxing. . . .

Don

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