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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been watching Jig Sticks build which I think is amazing BTW. I've never framed anything in my life so this one will be new for me. I do have a friend at work with quite a bit of experience though and is willing to give a hand.

Anyway I built these plans in Sketch Up so far to help me understand how it will fit together and be framed. It'll also help me get the angles and materials. Roof is 8/12 which matches my house. I'll either do a raised seam to match my house or shingles. Hardy and tyvek wrap also. Sill seals will be a must and it will be finished and insulated also.

It''l have a 9' plate height with a 10 ft ceiling.

Here are a few pictures of the framing so far. You can see I'm not done with he trusses yet. I need to figur out the spacing and how the ends will be.






 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This one shows hoe the OSB will sit on the roof. If you guys see anything that's not correct, let me know.

 

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You might consider dropping by your local lumber yard and talking about trusses with them. It might be a little cheaper/quicker and certainly easier to go with a pre-fab truss. You do the over-hang on the gable ends a bit differently than you have shown but I think ordering trusses will make your life much simpler.

By the way, you need to rotate your roof sheeting by 90°.

Have fun and good building.

(Just a not of caution - Building departments can be real sticklers if they catch you building something and you don't have a permit. Can really ruin your day. A second thing to consider if you don't pull a permit. Insurance will generally not cover a structure that was not properly inspected. If it burns down and you lose everything in it, you're on your own.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Here's one showing how the tractor will fit into the shed........but that creepy dude better not touch the tractor lol!!
[/IMG]

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thanks for the tips. I'm just winging it right now until i go check out a framing book. I'll have permits when I build, thanks.
 

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Love SketchUp. I use it to estimate projects/budget all the time.

Also helps to see it in the flesh so to speak.
 

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The only problem I see is the narrow piece of roof sheeting at the bottom. I would try to have that at least 24 inches wide.
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
This is how I had it in the plan...........


This is the preferred method correct?



Here is the wall construction detail. The only thing I couldn't really figure out was the bottom where the first piece goes on. Also, is there a sill seal that wraps up over the OSB?



 

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looking good it will keep you dry..One thing tho no matter how big you build it its never big enough ..trust me my shop is pretty big and i can fill it lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
looking good it will keep you dry..One thing tho no matter how big you build it its never big enough ..trust me my shop is pretty big and i can fill it lol
I already have a garage and I know what you mean. This is going to be for yard/wood tools only. All my mechanic type tools are staying in the garage.
 

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Nice drawings. Really cool how you were able to generate them. A few questions: why are you using trusses? Just stick build the rafters, thats all you need. what are the dimensions of the shed? Mine is 14x12ft. And I used 2x10 rafters. with that run you dont need trusses or those horizontal supports that are shown on your rafters. What I did was run 2x8 floor joists across the top plates and made a loft. That is MORE than enough to stiffen up the walls and add more structure. Plus you get a TON of loft space. Trusses really cut down on useable loft space.

When you frame in your opening for the garage door...instead of double or tripling up 2x4's....use 2x6s doubled up turned horizontally on both sides, and either 2x8 or 2x10 double headers. This makes installing the garage door MUCH MUCH easier. If you dont when you go to screw in the brackets for the door tracks some may fall right on a seam and split your framing.

I will take some pictures within the hour and get them posted on my shed build thread to show you what im talking about.

PS: your method for blocking in the corners is correct. good job.
 

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Here is a picture of the garage door rough opening. Its kind of dark so I dont know if you can see what Im talking about:





You want a nice flat surface without seams to intall the garage door track hardware. use 2x6 turned sideways, doubled up, on each side of the garage door rough in. and the header is no big deal. It will make your garage door installation much easier and nicer. Plus it will make everyone watching you build this believe that you know EXACTLY what your doing. :fing32:

I noticed something else in your sketch. You may want to make your concrete pad an inch or two larger than your shed. this way your walls will not overhang the pad. If your walls overhang the pad then water will come down the walls and hook under the overhang and rot your OSB. I made this mistake, but to get around it I installed a synthetic material called Azek along the bottom 5 1/2inches of my walls. So my walls are 5 1/2in of Azek along the bottom. Then 5/8 OSB was used from the Azek up to the top of the double top plate. hope that makes sense. I think I have a picture of it in my shed build thread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Glad you chimed in. I really like your build! The shed is the same, 12x14 but will have some outside storage too. I wanted a 9' plate height with a raised ceiling at 10', that is why you see the cross members on the "trusses". These are not actually trusses and are going to be stick built like you suggest.

Anyway, I think i will have only 9' plate height and ceiling. that way like you said, I'd have upper storage too. I'll just run a joist across the plate.

Here is the rafter layout. I took into consideration the 10x2 beam across the top and subtracted 3/4 inch.
I'm using this site for a tutorial. It's pretty good!

http://www.carpentry-pro-framer.com/cutting-rafters.html

Here is a picture.

 

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Make sure you check out my post. I just updated it with some pictures. I understand what your saying about wanting a high ceiling. My walls are 8ft 5 1/2in tall and even standing under my loft there is PLENTY of room. and the side w/o the loft is over 15ft high. When I put my loft it as soon as the joists were nailed in the entire shed "stiffened" considerably. I have no doubt that my loft could support over 2500lbs easily. There is a lot of storage up there. And this way i have a clutter free first floor for a work bench and room to work on tractors, rc helicopters / trucks, clean firearms, rig fishing gear, weld, etc....

My other suggesion is to use a LVL as your center beam. they are MUCH stronger than regular dimensional lumber. They cost a bit (mine was approximately 76$) but well worth it. Your entire structure will come out stronger, your roof will never sag (under heavy snow), and you will be able to hold a lot more weight in your loft. ****....Im going to install a winch in mine so that I can pull tractor motors out!

Your rafters look good. Make sure you ALWAYS cut 2 and just tack them in place to make sure they fit correctly. Then keep them as templates to mark off the rest of the rafters. Making rafters is tricky business. Stepping off is one way, thats the way I know how, but my carpenter buddy who does this stuff everyday has a much better way. he actually pulled out a TI85 calculus calculator when he was making my rafters. LOL that is WAAAAY beyond me.
 

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Oh I almost forgot. This screw up has be kind of mad :banghead3. When you go to install the "new contruction man doors", the bottom weather plate is attached already. Well the walls of my shed come out to the edge of the pad, and the Azek and OSB actually overhang the pad by 5/8in. Well that stupid weather guard sticks out a good 2inches from the pad. If i stepped on it it would definitely bend. I have to put some support under it to support it. So either make your concrete pad a few inches bigger than your shed, or keep your shed back from the edges of the pad a few inches. Either way, you need the pad bigger than the shed. I kick myself every day about this. making the form and pad a few inches bigger would have cost me pennies up front. Now its a big headache.
 

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Oh I almost forgot. This screw up has be kind of mad :banghead3. When you go to install the "new contruction man doors", the bottom weather plate is attached already. Well the walls of my shed come out to the edge of the pad, and the Azek and OSB actually overhang the pad by 5/8in. Well that stupid weather guard sticks out a good 2inches from the pad. If i stepped on it it would definitely bend. I have to put some support under it to support it. So either make your concrete pad a few inches bigger than your shed, or keep your shed back from the edges of the pad a few inches. Either way, you need the pad bigger than the shed. I kick myself every day about this. making the form and pad a few inches bigger would have cost me pennies up front. Now its a big headache.[/QUOTE




I almost made the same mistake myself
 

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You want the siding to hang over the edge of the concrete,If the cement slab is larger than the shed, every time it rains the water than lands on the concrete, will seep under the sill plate and come into the shed. My neighbor made that mistake. normally a concrete pad is poured out side of the door and is made to support the door sill.
 
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