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A little over two years ago I decided to beef up my Craftsman GT. After I started the project it just kept growing.

First I added a 2 inch receiver. Because the frame seemed a bit week I added 4in x 3/8in steel down both sides of the frame and welded a piece between them to support the 2" receiver. The factory hitch was cut off, floor boards and fenders were removed. Everything on the side of the frame reattached to the new frame rails. The idea to add frame rails came from looking at an International SCUT.

Second I needed more traction than the turf tires were giving me. I went with four wheeler tires that are taller than the turf tires. To compensate for the back sitting higher I removed the bracket front axle pin goes through, welded on plates, and re-drilled the hole fore axle pin 1 1/4" lower than stock. In the picture I haven't yet drilled the axle pin hole.

The stub shaft on top of the engine doesn't come into play yet, but bought it because I was already thinking hydraulics would be handy.
 

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I decided a 3 point hitch would be needed to really make my little tractor useful. In my last post showed the stub shaft on Kohler engine. Kohler does not market the stub shafts for vertical engines; I found shaft for same size horizontal engine and checked bolt pattern with caliper.

In the first photo the left frame rail can be seen and new battery location. The battery was moved to make room for a hydraulic tank.
Next you may notice the 2" receiver and ag PTO shaft. The ag PTO is a hydraulic motor from Surplus center, its the 7.63 cu in model. The plate the motor is mounted on is 3/8" steel like the fram rails.
The two pillow block bearings are 1 1/2", the keyed shaft is the same. A weldable 1 1/2" coupling ( cut in half) has the upper lift arms and hydraulic cylinder linkages welded to them. The upper lift arms and such are made of 3/8" x 4" steel plate.
The lower lift arms, draw bar and pins attaching lift arms to the frame came from Rural King. I don't recall where the lift linkages came from, I found them online.
The wheel spacers were necessary to make room for the hydraulic lift cylinders. The cylinders are 1.5 x 6" wolverine.
 

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In this first pic all of the pieces are there but the hydraulics are not hooked up. Also the mower deck has been permanently removed. The deck just kept falling apart.
The hydraulic tank is homemade from 1/8" steel plate and has several weld in bungs.
At some point I moved the hood hinge points forward but I don't recall why. I think it was a clearance issue with hydraulic hoses.

The hydraulic pump is a 0.277 cu in MTE D206-5491 (0.277*3000/231=3.6 gal/min). Used optical tachometer to get RPM.
The valve assembly is a prince 3 spool 8 gal/min. open center with power beyond possible. Figured 2 spool would do the trick but found a 3 spool for about the same price on Ebay.

All of the hydraulic hoses have JIC fittings. The pump, valves and cylinders have SAE ports. NPT was not used for any pressurized hydraulic line.

In the next to last picture the PTO motor is visible. Its worth noting that I tacked some angle iron together and welded it to the frame to raise the gas tank/ fenders and seat. This was to make room for the hydraulic lines to the PTO motor.

The two suitcase weights were added before I got the blade because I was getting a lot of push once the mower deck was removed. First time using the blade I decided to order a third weight.
 

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Starting off a bit out of order, the top link connection points. In that same pic just behind top link I ended up adding a random T fitting because the return hydraulic line was too short.

Next is the hydraulic pump for the PTO, in the pic its just hanging by the hydraulic lines. The pump is a Prince SP20B23A9H2L 1.403 cu in/Rev.

I photo 3 the pump is attached to a mounting bracket that is bolted to a piece of welded angle iron. The green bolt/nut is actually the tensioner. The pump is driven off the electric clutch that once ran the mower deck.

The last photo is the pump from the top. The right side is pressure to PTO motor. The left is return from PTO motor. On the left there is a "T" and a small hydraulic line, the small line is make-up fluid from the hydraulic tank. Not in these pics is a case drain on the PTO motor. It drains through an oil cooler and back to the tank.
 

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First PTO test with the tachometer. 547.3 RPM, not bad since my calculations were based on 550 RPM to allow some droop.

Next is the PTO oil cooler mentioned in my last post.

My first PTO tool from Titan attachments. Ordered it with a 9" auger and since then have bought a 12". This is the 60HP model I chose it over the 30HP because of a slightly lower gear ratio. The clutch on this unit was a deciding factor.

Assembled and ready to go.

One more hole. Been using the post hole digger to plant trees and bushes, around 12-14 so far.

Last I needed a way to get this thing off the tractor without help. Most of the angle iron for cart shipped with the unit. Wheels are harbor freight.
 

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PTO pump -1.403 cu-in @ 3000 engine rpm = 18.22 gpm.

Roughly 18 hp @ 1500psi.

Nice work! A lot of serious thinking going on with this project.

The lines should be 3/4", but 5/8" will work, and 1/2" are pushing the envelope for fluid velocity.

If you get the auger stuck, it would be nice to be able to throw a control valve over to back it out of the hole. I gather from your commentary that you aren't using a control valve and use the PTO switch for starting and stopping the PTO.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
PTO pump -1.403 cu-in @ 3000 engine rpm = 18.22 gpm.

Roughly 18 hp @ 1500psi.

Nice work! A lot of serious thinking going on with this project.

The lines should be 3/4", but 5/8" will work, and 1/2" are pushing the envelope for fluid velocity.

If you get the auger stuck, it would be nice to be able to throw a control valve over to back it out of the hole. I gather from your commentary that you aren't using a control valve and use the PTO switch for starting and stopping the PTO.
Unfortunately the PTO motor has sae #10 ports but I used hoses with JIC #12 fittings and 3/4 in lines; the pump has an sae #16 in and sae #12 out. The "T" I used at the pump input is 1" NPT. I was really trying to eleminate parasitic power loss since this tractor is so small. I really appreciate that you recognize how much thought went into this. I do wish the PTO was reversible but didn't see any good way to accommodate that pipe dream. I have stuck the auger twice now, once by a huge oak and once by a black walnut. Both times I had to take PTO shaft off and put a pipe wrench on auger. Thus far the most power intensive thing I have ran with PTO is a Woods RM 59-3 finish mower. At some point I would really like to see what the HP is on a PTO Dyno.
 

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The size of the component ports is not as critical as the size of the lines between the ports.

Parasitic power loss in hydraulics is due to several factors, none of which are affected by the size of the tractor. Internal component leakage is the big one. Parts that are expected to move freely have clearance to do so, and that clearance allows fluid to leak from the high pressure side of the component to the low pressure side. Undersized lines can also contribute to parasitic power losses due to friction between the wall of the lines and the fluid itself. An excess of fittings, particularly the ones incorporating an angle for changing direction, will also contribute. The type of pump and/or motor is another source of power loss, with piston pumps/motors being the most efficient, and gear pumps/motors being the least. Piston to piston hydrostatic transmissions are the most efficient for transmitting power.

If the motor that you have is reversible, this valve will give you bi-directional control with detents to hold the spool in position for working.

Installation:

Pump > Control Valve > Reservoir Return

The two ports on top of the valve body go to the motor. The drain on the motor can be Teed into the return line.

The big advantage of a hydraulic PTO is that the motor can be installed directly on the implement without the need for a drive shaft. Quick connects installed on the back of the tractor allow the lines from the motor to be plugged into the work lines from the valve body.

Sizing the motor for a given implement is the important part, whether using a drive shaft from the rear PTO on the tractor, or hydraulic lines from the valve. The motor for the auger will turn considerably slower than the one needed for a finishing mower. Changing the motor displacement is a lot easier than building a gear box or chain reduction to accommodate implements with higher or lower rpm requirements.
 

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That is pretty darn cool! Nice engineering and nice work!

Some people would say "If you want a more capable tractor, then buy a more capable tractor." Certainly understandable if you make your living with that equipment.
But you obviously have the time, knowledge, tools, equipment and desire to accomplish cool things - so HAVE FUN!

And keep posting
 

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Very nicely done. I’ll bet you have less side-to-side play on your 3pt hitch than I do on my JD engineered 2305.


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NICE WORK T.Cruit!

Could someone use a smaller fluid tank for this application (limited space)?

About how much was it for the pump and tank?

Where did you purchase the parts? ($?)

What specifications should I be looking for?

My GT6P000 (M# 917.255950) is a Horizontal Shaft, but then I could mount the pump in the front... Or would a Vertical Shaft be a better application?

Always looking for my next project for fabrication purposes!

Thank you for sharing your enginuity and abilities! :-D

-Thomas (12)
Port Orchard, Washington

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
 

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NICE WORK T.Cruit!

Could someone use a smaller fluid tank for this application (limited space)?
Reservoir size depends on:

a) Maximum pump flow rate.

b) End use of the fluid (cylinders or motor).

Industrial standards are two gallons of reservoir fluid for every one gallon of fluid flow for stationary systems. As you note, with mobile hydraulic systems, space is in short supply and the reservoir capacity will be much more restricted and is determined more by the end use.

Cylinders have a lot of surface area to help with cooling and GT FEL systems can get away with as little as an eighth of the flow rate, but 1/4 the flow rate is more usual. The primary reason is that the cylinders do not demand heat generating high pressure for a large percentage of the operating time.

Motors are a different story and require considerably more fluid to allow time for the reservoir walls to reject excess heat generated by constant use at pressure. Close monitoring of the reservoir temperature is necessary for undersized reservoirs. Max temperature for hydraulic systems is about 190° F. The reservoir for the system under discussion appears to be about 3-4 gallons and is well on the side of undersized for an 18 gpm flow rate for motor use. A 6 gallon reservoir would be somewhat more appropriate for sustained high pressure use, again, with temperature monitoring. An oil cooler may be necessary, depending on the duration of the work load (time at pressure), and the ambient air temperature.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
NICE WORK T.Cruit!

Could someone use a smaller fluid tank for this application (limited space)?

About how much was it for the pump and tank?

Where did you purchase the parts? ($?)

What specifications should I be looking for?

My GT6P000 (M# 917.255950) is a Horizontal Shaft, but then I could mount the pump in the front... Or would a Vertical Shaft be a better application?

Always looking for my next project for fabrication purposes!

Thank you for sharing your enginuity and abilities! ?

-Thomas (12)
Port Orchard, Washington

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
The tank capacity is actually close to 7 gallons. The system actually has close to 7 gallons in it, leaving a little room in tank for expansion.

I'm with Tudor on tank size, go with the biggest that will fit application. Unable to find a good fitting tank I made the one for this tractor. The filler port/cap is from surplus center and also the weld in bungs.

Both hydraulic pumps came from surplus center. The little pump was around $100, the big pump for the PTO was $241.15.

In your application horizontal shaft should be fine. When buying a hydraulic pump getting the pump foot mount will save you some Fab time. As far as specs go, direction of rotation and speed are critical. I used an optical tachometer and based calculations on that. I picked around 4 gpm flow rate or 924cu inches. So 924/3000=0.308 cu in/revolution pump size. The
actual pump I used is 0.277cu in/rev so I didn't quite make it.

Good luck, start a thread on it.
 

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New Gas Tank! A few months ago my factory tank started leaking at the seam. I made a new tank from 1/8" steel. I thought this was the best solution because the old tank did not accommodate one of the hydraulic hoses to the PTO motor. I had already raised the tank and fenders once for this reason. In order to make the seat clear the tank cap I raised the seat. Also raised the shifter as it was getting tough to reach.
 

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