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Barely Keepin' Up
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255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well after stripping most everything off the frame and doing some metal work, I ran a test today to see if the rear diff is a limited slip.

This is the test did, see if this makes sense and if you think it will work.

I put a jack stand on one axle and a floor jack under the other. I started the motor which I haven't ran in over a year, and she fired right up, I had to pull start it since I don't have any electrical hooked up and I lost my belt for it.

I let her run for a bit put it in forward let the wheels start to spin, and lowered the jack to simulate me applying the brakes to that side. The tire imediately stopped spinning and the other in the air continued to spin. I attempted to stop it to make sure it wouldn't just quit and it didn't.

This experiment made me think that my differential braking on the 990 should allow me to turn the dozer as designed.

Any thoughts or ideas about the outcome?:thThumbsU
 

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The Magnificent
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20,952 Posts
That is interesting. I think it proves that not all 990s are limited slip differentials?

When both wheels were in the air, were they spinning the same direction, or opposite directions?
 

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Barely Keepin' Up
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255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Interesting question, if it was close to neutral, (need to adjust it obviously, has classic JD creep, neutral kept moving, unless both were on the ground it acted differently maybe?) both were spinning opposite.

If you selected a direction they would turn the same direction at the same speed.
 

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Registered
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1,892 Posts
This is expected behavior. Limited slip doesn't mean that you'll get full torque to the stopped wheel but rather "more than none".

Also, by Peerless' description of their limited slip feature, the gears on the stopped wheel will clench down more tightly in an attempt to move the wheel. I'm sure that years of wear will reduce this effect.
 

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Barely Keepin' Up
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255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What I am worried about is investing time and money into track sprockets, brakes, brake disks ect. and then not having it work right, then having to buy a different tractor to put all the parts on to make one costing me even more.
 

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7,939 Posts
This may not be a new concept you are working on, so my question may have been previously answered, but, the question is; :dunno:

Are you trying to

achieve traction,
or,
make a tracked machine??

If your goal is traction, non-typical tires can give you traction.


I recently added these tires to my blade tractor.

Land vehicle Vehicle Automotive tire Tire Motor vehicle


Each tire puts 60 square inches on the ground sitting on a level surface, with no operator weight. The square inches goes up when the operator weight is added.

These tires are radials, the biggest reason for the big footprint.

Compare that to bias ply tires that may have 20 square inches of contact, even with an operator!!

With bias ply tires on this tractor, the engine never saw a load in second gear.

The radials give so much traction, the tractor will now put a load on the engine in first gear!! :drunkie:

Traction is now almost unbelievable!!

Tires may give you all the traction the transmission/engine can handle.

Just an idea. :trink40: <-Hot Chocolate, hoping for snow!!
 

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Barely Keepin' Up
Joined
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255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ultimately what I want is a tracked vehicle with a huge flotation footprint to run on grass and not damage, with huge traction from the tracks, adding a backhoe, a ripper, a blade, auger, and FEL. I foresee a part time gig trenching rough in plumbing, fenceposts, landscaping, egress windows, little stuff/fun stuff, my job sucks seat time is great, gotta figure out a way to pay for my toys for the wife's justification.
 

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Registered
Joined
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513 Posts
This may not be a new concept you are working on, so my question may have been previously answered, but, the question is; :dunno:

Are you trying to

achieve traction,
or,
make a tracked machine??

If your goal is traction, non-typical tires can give you traction.


I recently added these tires to my blade tractor.

View attachment 195244

Each tire puts 60 square inches on the ground sitting on a level surface, with no operator weight. The square inches goes up when the operator weight is added.

These tires are radials, the biggest reason for the big footprint.

Compare that to bias ply tires that may have 20 square inches of contact, even with an operator!!

With bias ply tires on this tractor, the engine never saw a load in second gear.

The radials give so much traction, the tractor will now put a load on the engine in first gear!! :drunkie:

Traction is now almost unbelievable!!

Tires may give you all the traction the transmission/engine can handle.

Just an idea. :trink40: <-Hot Chocolate, hoping for snow!!
apologies to the OP for the detour but what kind of tires are those?
 
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