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Tractorhead
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello guys,

Yes, yes, I know there's certainly nothing new about a 222 with a H50 blade that's for sure but I said I'd post pictures of the tractor and blade when I got the blade mounted and we all like pictures of Case LGTs right? Finally got the front H50 blade on this afternoon and played in the dirt some to get to know the blade and tractor relationship. I have a service/access road on my property that I'm continuously filling in ruts on after rain storms so this blade will get some use. I needed to put a new cutting edge on it, the cutting edge from the PO was pretty worn. The blade and tractor work good with the exception the blade doesn't lift high enough in my opinion. When the blade is set at the furthest most angle (either right or left) the low corner edge is pretty darn close to the ground indeed. I seem to remember someone bringing this up in a thread some time ago and wanting to change the way the tractor lifted the blade (straight up verses at a lower pivot/fulcrum point). I will need to fabricate some sort of weight bracket and weights for the rear however.

222_H50blade_01.jpg 222_H50blade_02.jpg
222_H50blade_03.jpg 222_H50blade_04.jpg


A few words regarding Ag/Bar tires. If you don't already have 'em on your tractor and you do a considerable amount of blade work you should really consider purchasing a set. They're worth it I can almost guarantee that. My father ran chains and turf tires on one of his LGTs for years and I drove that tractor for years as a boy so I know what chains are capable and not capable of (I still have that worn out set of chains my father and I used). When I inherited that tractor I put Ag tires on it and I won't go back to chains I can guarantee that. Yeah, yeah, sure there are some here that will swear by chains and there are others who'll swear at chains regardless of what anyone says you can guess which category I fall into and that will never change.
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That's a nice set-up.
Did Case ever have a mid-mount grader blade?

On that 222, do you think the narrower rear tires help quite a bit? More bite than float?
 

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Tractorhead
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Regarding the height of the blade when lifted. What would be the cause and effect if I were to make a new shorter front lift link about 1/4" or 1/2" shorter? I would loose some down force depth capabilities I'm sure. Any thoughts?

222_H50blade_05.jpg
 

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Tractorhead
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's a nice set-up.
Did Case ever have a mid-mount grader blade?
I don't believe so Cat385B. I've never seen one. Sure wouldn't be a bad idea and it wouldn't be that difficult to fabricate.


On that 222, do you think the narrower rear tires help quite a bit? More bite than float?
Well, I can tell you this I do have less of a footprint with the narrower rear Ags leaving me with somewhat less of a bite than a larger Ag rear such as a 23x1050-12 on an 8.5 rim. I trend towards stock rims and tire sizes - I just like it that way. In fact my decision to purchase 850 Ag tires was based on the fact that this tractor came stock with 850s and I wanted to stay at that tire size. In my opinion you can over do it and put too much tire on these LGTs reducing the overall performance. The way it sits now the tires sit well inside the tiller swath and that's another added feature for me. So, I guess to answer your question I don't really think I've sacrificed much as far as the ground control bite with a narrower rear Ag.

222_tiller03.jpg
 

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Does the blade bite well into the gravel, or does it ride over hard spots? The lift rod modification might make that into a problem. (which could be countered by added weight to the blade in the center)
 

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Case never offered a mid-mount grader blade made by them and I am not aware of any aftermarket company offering one either.

Kdursus,
The problem that you mention with blade height when angled is universal with blades that are mounted to tractors in this manner. In order to overcome the problem, you would have to change the mounting system to one that is known as "parallel lift". This type uses four lift links. Two at the bottom and two at the top. The face of the blade always remains square to the ground as it raises and lowers whereas the mounting system Case and so many others use, causes the face of the blade to travel in an arc.

At one time, Sears Craftsman offered a snow/dirt blade for their GT's that had the parallelogram linkage but some other brands did as well. You can play with the linkage on your blade if you wish but you are up against the basic design flaw of this type of mount. The smaller bulldozers overcome this problem with what is known as a "six-way blade" that allows the operator the ability to hydraulically pivot the blade's axis and thus level the cutting edge when the blade is angled either right or left.

And speaking of bulldozers, they can also be fitted with an item called a "ripper bar" that has one or more "teeth" mounted on adjustable shanks that are used to penetrate the ground and tear it open. Those ripper bars are available in two styles. You will see them as either the standard, single pivot mount that travels in an arc like your blade does or in the more sophisticated parallelogram ripper mount that keeps the angle of the ripper teeth constant no matter how high or low the ripper bar is.

If you are not familiar with these concepts, the is link http://www.euromodellmohr.co.uk/deere-650j-precision.html may help provide the visuals for you. The dozer depicted uses a 6-way blade and a parallel ripper on the rear. The last photo is probably the best as it clearly shows the upper and lower control links that keep the ripper teeth perfectly vertical at all times.

I know what it is that you want to accomplish and I'm telling you that the only true way to make that happen is with parallelogram linkage. However, if you want to play with your blade in this manner, then I suggest that you focus on the bell crank's attachment point moreso than the lift rod. The arc of the bellcrank is what controls how high the blade comes off the ground. Making the arc larger will provide more lift but the cylinder will have less leverage. There's always a trade-off I'm afraid.
 

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To increase the lift of my H blade I made a plate to mount to the tractor lift point that raised the pivot point about 2 1/4 inches. This raises the plow 10 inches when the plow is straight. You may want to go less than 2 1/4 inches if you want to loose less down pressure. I have a picture but don't know how to add it here. It is in the Yahoo Case group picture file under Chip's Case Stuff.
Chip
 

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I'm not sure of the possible conflicks with the main lift arm hitting but it seems like the location of the lift arm to the rocker shaft plate could be extended say 1" and this would give you more of a radius thus increasing the up/down travel of the blade. The same thing may be achieved by lengthening the lift arm up front.

:fing20:
 

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Tractorhead
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you all for the great thoughtful advice on getting more lift out of my H50. I'll toy with a few ideas and if I come up with a cool solution I'll be sure to let everyone in on it.
 
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