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Discussion Starter #1
I have a "Ninja" blade on my mower. Is there anything you folks think might be better? :tango_face_smile:
 

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You kinda have to understand what happens in any mowing deck. There is a shaft that has a blade connected to it. If the blade is completely flat, it slices thru the grass at a high speed and relies almost completely on gravity to drop the clippings to the ground. Since by moving forward, you are constantly feeding more grass to be cut, but because gravity is a weak force, the grass will build up inside the deck, eventually clogging the deck completely.
But almost all mower blades have some kind of a wing or ramp in back of the cutting edge. This wing or ramp introduces turbulence inside the deck which makes the grass cuttings bounce about and fall to the ground or into the chute faster. The design of the mower deck also helps create the space to allow these clippings to bounce around.
Using a dedicated mulching blade, the wing or ramp is serrated, meaning it has teeth, but they are not the primary cutting edge. This back side of the cutting edge helps to cut the clippings into smaller and smaller pieces, which then drop to the ground.

Looking at that kit, it would increase the turbulence that is already on the blade. The question is how you are going to attach it to the blade? Blades are extremely hard and it takes special tools to drill holes in a blade. Sure, by increasing the turbulence inside the cutting deck, it will make using that clean out thingy work better. Because the more turbulence combined with the water will wash it out better. Think of it like a washing machine: simply placing clothes in a tub of water kinda sorta gets them clean. But if you agitate the water (the turbulence), the clothes get cleaner faster.

Some people do not use that wash out thingy on the deck for a very good reason. It makes steel decks and blades rust faster if you don't dry it out after using it.
 

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Gator Blades: I used to use them. Do they chop up the grass? Yes they do. But they make a soupy mess on your lawn, particularly in the spring while the grass is "fat" and really wet. I used them for several years, and after looking at the general appearance of the lawn, I no longer purchase mulching blades. I just go with the straight style with the curved "wing" behind the cutting edge. Seems to make the lawn not as messy, and the cut is cleaner.
 

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You are quite correct, hotajax!!! But very likely what you and many others don't understand is that mulching is almost a completely different animal than bagging or discharging. You cannot simply plug the discharge port of the deck and install a mulching blade, then cut as you normally would. Ideally, with a mulching blade and the closed off port, you should cut a maximum of half an inch of the top of the grass and mow quite slow. Not many do that, then are dissatisfied with the results, as you were.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You kinda have to understand what happens in any mowing deck. There is a shaft that has a blade connected to it. If the blade is completely flat, it slices thru the grass at a high speed and relies almost completely on gravity to drop the clippings to the ground. Since by moving forward, you are constantly feeding more grass to be cut, but because gravity is a weak force, the grass will build up inside the deck, eventually clogging the deck completely.
But almost all mower blades have some kind of a wing or ramp in back of the cutting edge. This wing or ramp introduces turbulence inside the deck which makes the grass cuttings bounce about and fall to the ground or into the chute faster. The design of the mower deck also helps create the space to allow these clippings to bounce around.
Using a dedicated mulching blade, the wing or ramp is serrated, meaning it has teeth, but they are not the primary cutting edge. This back side of the cutting edge helps to cut the clippings into smaller and smaller pieces, which then drop to the ground.

Looking at that kit, it would increase the turbulence that is already on the blade. The question is how you are going to attach it to the blade? Blades are extremely hard and it takes special tools to drill holes in a blade. Sure, by increasing the turbulence inside the cutting deck, it will make using that clean out thingy work better. Because the more turbulence combined with the water will wash it out better. Think of it like a washing machine: simply placing clothes in a tub of water kinda sorta gets them clean. But if you agitate the water (the turbulence), the clothes get cleaner faster.

Some people do not use that wash out thingy on the deck for a very good reason. It makes steel decks and blades rust faster if you don't dry it out after using it.
Thanks for your time and information. I totally agree with what you've said. If you will notice (enlarge) the blade in the picture I provided, you will notice that this blade is already drilled to except the "wing" things, hardware included. I also plan on letting the blade run a bit after the water is turned off so it should be dry enough from the time it takes to go from my water supply to my shed. :tango_face_smile:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Gator Blades: I used to use them. Do they chop up the grass? Yes they do. But they make a soupy mess on your lawn, particularly in the spring while the grass is "fat" and really wet. I used them for several years, and after looking at the general appearance of the lawn, I no longer purchase mulching blades. I just go with the straight style with the curved "wing" behind the cutting edge. Seems to make the lawn not as messy, and the cut is cleaner.
That's exactly what I have been doing in past years. Using the standard or ninja blade and putting up with the frustration. I'm somewhat handicapped and lifting the mower to scrape clipping is a pain. I have a chain hoist in my shed but I'm looking for a short-cut. :tango_face_smile:
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
I'd like to add. My purpose for all of this is to really not mulch the grass. I'm more concerned about keeping the underside of the deck clean to avoid those "cow plops" on my lawn. I've never used my "mulching" plug. When using the deck wash thing,(everytime I mow) I plan on using something to temporarily block the exhaust grass opening and lowering the mower deck to the ground. With the blade and wings that I've described above, I believe this will help my issue a great deal. I'm just a retired farmer that reads a LOT and is willing to learn from other folks with ideas.

I also have a (safe?) "hack" in the works to correct my issue of having a hard time using the mower engaging handle. I'll need time to test it. :tango_face_glasses:
 

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My apologies, I only looked the "wings" that your post referred to and not the blade. The same applies to the "cow plops" or clumps of grass, slow the speed of cutting down and the clumps disappear. By mowing a bit too fast, the clippings accumulate inside the deck until they plop out instead of being distributed more evenly. Wet grass only makes it worse. There really isn't anything out there that works to keep the underside of the deck clean and free.
 

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Snapper at least real snappers....almost always have unique blade designs and they work very well. I have never seen any reason to deviate from a sharp, straight factory snapper blade.
 

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Snapper blades with the 'bent up' wingtip create enough airflow to throw 89.337% of the clippings out the opening. Exact number unknown, made up by me.
If you rinse under the deck, I would suggest leaving the clipping exit open at least for a while to allow the loose clumps to exit rather than be turned to grass slurry. I think(may be wrong) getting the looser stuff out will allow the remaining bit to get full flow of the water.
tom
 

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Five or six years back I went to buy a Gator blade for my dads 30" Snaper. The dealer didn't have one and sold me a Preditor made by Sunbelt. I use it in the fall for leafs in areas I can't get a wider tractor and some during the summer around the grass fields that can't be mowed for hay. As you all know if you have any area that Is not as level as a table top the old Snapers likes to scap. I checked the blade afterthree years or so and was going to sharpen it, it didn't need sharpen. There were a few small nicks in the blade where it had hit rocks. I have since bought XHT blades by Sunbeltfor my tractor mowers. I allready have a couple of sets of Gators for them. The XHT blade are regular mid lift blades. I have older tractor and they are a little harder to find for them they for it then tractors being sold today.
 

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I have seen blades had been run for three years that were not nicked up because they're not hitting rocks or sticks or pine cones but they were always dull with the edge rounded over.
 
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