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Mulch mowing is not the exact science that it is purported to be and takes time and experience with your own lawn to get the best results. What works for you and your equipment can be quite different than a neighbor with different equipment or even the same.
Mulch mowing involves a closed cutting deck where the grass is cut numerous times before it falls straight down to the ground. The tractor manufacturers each have their own method of blades that supposedly work with their cutting decks. It may work with their test lawns, but may not work for your lawn.
Mulching blades come in two styles: One uses a wavy blade pattern and the other uses a serrated rear wing in back of the main cutting edge. Neither one is really a high lift blade. High lift is not what you want when mulching as you want the clippings to loft inside the deck as the blades cut them numerous times.

Mulch mowing is also a different critter than side discharging or bagging. You HAVE to allow the time for the blades to cut the grass several times without overloading the deck. When you overload the deck, that is when you get clumps of clippings deposited in your wake. Slowing down the forward speed helps to minimize overloading. With the wavy style mulching blades, one should only be cutting less than an inch of grass at a slow forward speed. The serrated rear wing can handle a deeper cut, again at a slow forward speed.

I mulch mow only year round with the Oregon Gator G6 commercial mulching blades in my yard of mixed grasses & weeds. Only in very thick tall vegetation do I leave any noticeable clippings in my wake which the next rain makes disappear. Leaves drop year round here and they get blown into long low piles that usually get pulverized in one pass with the mulching blades set at the normal cutting height of 3 inches.
 
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There are many misconceptions about mulch mowing. It is very different than simply side discharging and/or bagging. It is a process with many variables that you have to play with to get good results. Many think that by just slapping on a set of mulching blades will do the trick and are usually sadly disappointed with the results.

Gator Mulching blades are not high lift. A high lift blade will have an uninterrupted sharp curve upward in back of the cutting edge where the air flows up and over helping to make the grass blades underneath stand up to be cut by that cutting edge. High lift blades also increase the flow out of the deck or distance thrown with side discharging. Take a good look at the serrated rear wing of the Gator, or similar, mulching blades. Those serrations are cutting edges and not an uninterrupted curve for high lift. They are designed to make the clippings cut by the edge of the blade to be thrown to the top of the deck where as they fall down are cut many times again by those serrated cutting edges. That process only occurs with a closed deck.
The wavy style mulching blades are designed to cut only the top half inch or inch of the grass and the varying heights of the cutting edges cut it again as they are thrown about inside the deck.

But perhaps the largest problem is that almost all mowing decks are what is termed a 3-way deck in that they can be used for side discharging, bagging or mulching. What most don't realize is that those 3-way do not perform any one of those methods the best they could if they were designed for whichever process. Ideally, a mulching deck would have a tall domed upper deck where the clippings could be held aloft for longer periods while the cutting edges of a mulching blade slice them into smaller pieces. Most decks today have flat top sides.

As I said, there are many variables to mulch mowing that you have to play with to get the best results. It took me a long time to play with many things, but I am more than pleased with the results each time I mow. No clippings are discernible anywhere.
 
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