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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi I have a 96 yardman with a kohler 22 hp v twin lately when i try to start it it floods and i have to remove the plugs clean them and usually it will start up. It usually is pretty cold out an I have not used the choke because that seemed to make it worse. The plugs are pretty new and also did a full tune up, plugs,oil,air cleaner. Also after about 10 minutes of run time its starts to hesitate a little. Thank you in advance for any ideas.:trink39:
 

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If it were mine, I would drop the float bowl {after draining the tank or otherwise blocking flow} and check that the float valve worked properly. If it floods, it is getting too much fuel, and the first cause is a leaky needle and/or seat. And lots of leaky needle/seat problems are caused by 'stuff' getting between the needle and seat. Gunk, in other words.
tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If it were mine, I would drop the float bowl {after draining the tank or otherwise blocking flow} and check that the float valve worked properly. If it floods, it is getting too much fuel, and the first cause is a leaky needle and/or seat. And lots of leaky needle/seat problems are caused by 'stuff' getting between the needle and seat. Gunk, in other words.
tom
That sounds like a good start, but I think it is injected, would it still have a carb bowl? also when it is running should you be able to see a full fuel filter?There is a see thru filter but when its running it almost looks like the fuel isnt filling the filter fast enough, it is new and a factory spec filter. thank you
 

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Hmmm, I didn't know Kohler made injected engines... So I went here:

http://www.kohlerengines.com/onlinecatalog/productDetail.htm?productNumber=Command PRO CV23/CV680

As it is the closest to the Command 22hp model which I think you have. Per Red, the changes between the Command and Command Pro are mostly in the longevity area, such as forged or chromed crankshafts .. I don't remember the details, but you can find it if you search the Small Engines links...
No mention of injector in the documentation displayed ... Are you sure?
tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hmmm, I didn't know Kohler made injected engines... So I went here:

http://www.kohlerengines.com/onlinecatalog/productDetail.htm?productNumber=Command PRO CV23/CV680

As it is the closest to the Command 22hp model which I think you have. Per Red, the changes between the Command and Command Pro are mostly in the longevity area, such as forged or chromed crankshafts .. I don't remember the details, but you can find it if you search the Small Engines links...
No mention of injector in the documentation displayed ... Are you sure?
tom
Yea I think I am wrong, it has like a pulse injector but it still has a carb. It seems to start good when its warmer out the thing that worries me now is the other day when i plowed towards the end it was running pretty bad even back firing and at low idle it wanted to die thanks.
 

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I'd start by blowing through the fuel line backward with the fuel cap off and seeing if there's any blockage or partial blockage.

If you want to isolate issues with the carb over flowing fuel into the engine, purchase a $7 fuel cut-off, and put it in the fuel line, in a convenient to get to location. Prior to shutting off the engine, turn off the fuel and let the engine run for another minute or so. This will use up some of the fuel in the carb. Then, on the next restart, see how it starts. If it fires right up normally, you know you're probably getting fuel from the carb into the engine after shut down. You might have a bad carb shut-off solenoid, or a bad needle and seat in the float bowl. Either way, the $7 cut-off is a good way to test, and actually, a fix.

The poor running after a while sounds like it's running lean, and starving for fuel. Pay attention to the exhaust. If you're getting sooty black, that's too much fuel. If you don't see anything abnormal with the exhaust, and you're getting that sputtering and bad/dying at idle, it's not getting enough fuel. Could be crud in the float bowl getting sucked up into the main jet after a few minutes, could be that clear fuel filter, could be the pickup in the fuel tank, or the fuel hose is collapsing inside from exposure to ethanol fuels. I had a 2008 Husqvarna over the weekend with the hose from the tank to the engine that was so brittle from ethanol, (it was leaking near the engine) that when I touched it to remove it, the entire thing broke apart into chunks and pieces and came out looking like an old dirty tree branch.........talk about a reason for a recall!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ok so today was warm about 45 and it started right up first crank ran pretty good at high speed but after a minute it was pulsating a bit if i pulled the choke out about a quarter or half it would smooth out and run good same with low idle i had to keep the choke about half closed. I took the air cleaner assembly off to look for a carb bowl, and didnt see one, I did however see some wires running into carb on the bottom, not sure what those are for, the carb to me looks a little more complex then any other carb I have messed with before. I appreciate every ones input.:thanku:
 

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So you've either got a carb with partially clogged jets, or a bit of water in the fuel, or a partially restricted fuel supply (partially plugged fuel filter or crud in the fuel supply hose, or a bad hose, etc)

More than likely it's partially clogged jets, but it doesn't hurt to check out the fuel supply side of this issue.

If it were mine, I'd make sure there wasn't a fuel supply or water in the fuel issue, and if that checked out, I'd poor a few glugs of SeaFoam into the fuel tank and go find some work to do with it...letting it run at full throttle, and slowly decreasing the amount of choke.

If this doesn't clear up the lean running condition, I'd move forward with removing, dismantling and cleaning the carb.

Some carbs have a pulse fuel pump right on the carb, so don't have a bowl. Otherwise, the bowl is at the bottom of the carb and the wires you see, are going to the fuel cut-off solenoid located on the side/bottom of the bowl.

Some times, you can get lucky, and remove the bowl (usually a 7/16" nut on the bottom....or similar) and you'll find a bunch of water and crud in the bowl. You can clean out all that, put it back on the carb (sometimes you can do this with the carb still on the engine) and you're back in business. Other times, it takes more of a tear down, compressed air, and even mechanically cleaning the jets with fine wire.

If you do find water in the bowl, you've probably got water in the fuel tank. You'd need to dump the fuel tank.....or if the pick up tube is at the bottom of the tank, fill the tank, and then drain the water using the weight of the fuel since water is heavier and will sit in a puddle at the bottom of the tank. Depending on tank and fuel pick-up location, you can sometimes do this via gravity. Otherwise, you can use a suction tool, like a MityVac to suck out all the water.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So you've either got a carb with partially clogged jets, or a bit of water in the fuel, or a partially restricted fuel supply (partially plugged fuel filter or crud in the fuel supply hose, or a bad hose, etc)

More than likely it's partially clogged jets, but it doesn't hurt to check out the fuel supply side of this issue.

If it were mine, I'd make sure there wasn't a fuel supply or water in the fuel issue, and if that checked out, I'd poor a few glugs of SeaFoam into the fuel tank and go find some work to do with it...letting it run at full throttle, and slowly decreasing the amount of choke.

If this doesn't clear up the lean running condition, I'd move forward with removing, dismantling and cleaning the carb.

Some carbs have a pulse fuel pump right on the carb, so don't have a bowl. Otherwise, the bowl is at the bottom of the carb and the wires you see, are going to the fuel cut-off solenoid located on the side/bottom of the bowl.

Some times, you can get lucky, and remove the bowl (usually a 7/16" nut on the bottom....or similar) and you'll find a bunch of water and crud in the bowl. You can clean out all that, put it back on the carb (sometimes you can do this with the carb still on the engine) and you're back in business. Other times, it takes more of a tear down, compressed air, and even mechanically cleaning the jets with fine wire.

If you do find water in the bowl, you've probably got water in the fuel tank. You'd need to dump the fuel tank.....or if the pick up tube is at the bottom of the tank, fill the tank, and then drain the water using the weight of the fuel since water is heavier and will sit in a puddle at the bottom of the tank. Depending on tank and fuel pick-up location, you can sometimes do this via gravity. Otherwise, you can use a suction tool, like a MityVac to suck out all the water.

Good luck!
Thank you Austin for the reply its been warmer out lately so its been starting good I did run a little sea foam thru the carb and it helped a little bit. I am going to Waite until winters over to clean the carb and try the things you said, because with my luck If I take it apart I will have know means of snow plowing if I dont get it back together again. I will keep this post updated with what I come up with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Today I used my air hose with a air gun and blew where the main fuel line goes into the carb, it cleared it right up, now it runs like new amazing what a little crud will do to your carb. Thanks for all your input guys.:trink39:
 

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If your carb has a rubber seat for the float needle, there's a chance you just blew it out of position. So yeah, full is going to flow, but the float needle won't be able to shut off the fuel supply. Generally not a good idea to blast compressed air into a fully assembled carb.

Be a real drag for the entire tank of fuel to syphon into the engine via the carb, and have a couple gallons of fuel in the crankcase.
 
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