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There were a few changes made to the fwd-rev and hiilo levers. First was the offset fed-rev / hi-lo. Then they decided to reverse the direction for fwd-reverse. Originally it was push the lever forward to go backwards.


I never heard of any lawsuit. If you want to talk about something that is a little goofy, check out the accellerator pedal for D8 Cat. Push the accelerator pedal down for idle. Take your foot off for WOT. It was very easy to have a runaway cat dozer.
 

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I was operating a model L with a sulky in 1967, at age 10, never had any "issues" with the controls. In fact is some ways it made perfect sense, pulling backward was easier, pushing forward to back up required more care - backing up should require more care?

Sheldon
 

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Yep there sure was, ever wonder why the 30" mower eventually had a front guard with chains hanging from it? I remember hearing about this on the yahoo gravely group, the poster discussed that change, now I can't remember but I think he worked for Gravely and had to deal with a law suit in regards to debris flying out from a gravely mower deck.


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And the controls have been backwards ever since. :dunno:
I find that the L's are the ones that are less safe and backwards. If the tractor runs away from you going backwards you don't think, pull back. You think, shove forward. You have to learn to operate an L. And Joe Consumer isn't that smart now days.
 

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I'm just the opposite. I operate the L's on autopilot but have to to think through every move on the others.
 

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I'm just the opposite. I operate the L's on autopilot but have to to think through every move on the others.
+1. Using the lever on my Ls is a habit, just like the controls on the 853 BCS. I can even keep my 5-speed Civic straight from my parents' 4-speed Civic. Same year but slightly different transmissions and I have yet to forget to shift out of 4th in mine or accidentally try to shift into a nonexistent 5th in theirs. I think I just don't have enough hours behind the '73 CI with the changed FWD/REV setup or any of the other newer Gravelys.
 

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When I load an L on my pickup truck using ramps, I can keep both hands on the handle bars and just use a thumb on the F/R lever to climb the ramps.

When I load my C10 on my truck, I have to keep one hand on the F/R lever.

L's are much more user friendly when you need to keep both hands on the handle bars and creep forward, at least for me.


Roger,
 

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+1. Using the lever on my Ls is a habit, just like the controls on the 853 BCS. I can even keep my 5-speed Civic straight from my parents' 4-speed Civic. Same year but slightly different transmissions and I have yet to forget to shift out of 4th in mine or accidentally try to shift into a nonexistent 5th in theirs. I think I just don't have enough hours behind the '73 CI with the changed FWD/REV setup or any of the other newer Gravelys.
I have many more hours with tractors that are F=F and R=R. All Gravely's 4 wheel tractors were done correctly. All ZTRs done by Gravely were done correctly. The Ls and Cs before 1972 are the oddballs. Hook up a steering sulky to an L and most operators now days would have an accident.

But I also hate vehicles where they put many items on stalks on the column or steering wheels. And you get into another vehicle and things are just the opposite. 2001 3500 has the wiper control on the left on the turn signal stalk and cruise control there too. 2009 Vibe has wiper control on right stalk and cruise control on a stalk on the steering wheel. 1991 G20 van had the same layout as the 2001 truck.
 

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When I load an L on my pickup truck using ramps, I can keep both hands on the handle bars and just use a thumb on the F/R lever to climb the ramps.

When I load my C10 on my truck, I have to keep one hand on the F/R lever.

L's are much more user friendly when you need to keep both hands on the handle bars and creep forward, at least for me.


Roger,
No ramps are ever used for loading tractors from ground level into my truck. Too steep an angle unless you use a ditch to get the rear down. Unloading with ramps at the house has the truck bed angled up hill with the ramps being more level so works ok.
 

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Several people this year have seen my OSHA approved method of loading a 2 wheeler!!



:ROF

When I loaded this one, the ramps that came with the trailer are so short, the seller said the machine would not go up the ramps.



I simply lifted the dump bed about 15 degrees, and the ramps were then lower and at less angle, the Gravely went right up.

The trick is stopping the machine at the right location, on a 15 degree angle!! :hide:



I am too old to do anything like using ramps to get a machine into a pickup. ;)
 

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My ramps are eight foot 2 X 12's made from treated Southern Yellow Pine.

I have the aluminum ramp end caps on the boards and they weigh a ton.

My tailgate is three foot off the ground, and I have a concrete driveway, no hills anywhere near me. :-(

I load and unload two wheelers often.

If a tractor is not running, I rig a come-along to pull it up into the truck, and slip the clutch while in gear, using it as a brake coming down the ramps.

Roger,
 

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I have two foldable steel ramps that gave away on me...I welded them up and put 2"x8"s on the tops and bottoms. Now they double as boat ankers. I went out and bought me two aluminum arched ramps that weigh 15# a piece.
 

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My ramps are eight foot 2 X 12's made from treated Southern Yellow Pine.

I have the aluminum ramp end caps on the boards and they weigh a ton.

My tailgate is three foot off the ground, and I have a concrete driveway, no hills anywhere near me. :-(

I load and unload two wheelers often.

If a tractor is not running, I rig a come-along to pull it up into the truck, and slip the clutch while in gear, using it as a brake coming down the ramps.

Roger,
:confused: What truck are you driving now Roger?
 

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Back to the fed/rev lever, I always wondered why the Gravely engineers set them to act in an opposite way of the motion of the tractor. The reverse action should be adjusted in such a manner that prevents the operator from locking the lever in reverse...of course all my L's can be locked in fwd or rev, one day that is going to bite me.


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Don - I still have my 2006 Chevy pick-em-up. I swear the new trucks are even higher.


cmeyers - you can adjust the old L's and C's so that they cannot lock into reverse. I have not done that yet, and so far none of my tractors ran me over yet going in reverse. I seldom lock a tractor in reverse.

Roger,
 

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I remember like it was yesterday. The day dad traded the L, for the commercial 12. Yep the shifters were backwards... We grumbled about it for weeks until we got used to it. The hard part was operating from the old sulky, you have to always reach forward to hold the lever in forward during those times you did not want to lock it. After 42 years I don't give it a second thought... BTW my reverse never locks... I did prefer the L f/r. You could ride the sulky and just lay your hand on the lever and go... FB...
 

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Back to the fed/rev lever, I always wondered why the Gravely engineers set them to act in an opposite way of the motion of the tractor. The reverse action should be adjusted in such a manner that prevents the operator from locking the lever in reverse...of course all my L's can be locked in fwd or rev, one day that is going to bite me.
I have no idea what reasons Gravely engineers had, but I can think of two advantages to the old (backwards) forward/reverse lever position. First, when you put the tractor in gear to go forward, it moves forward; having the lever going down to the rear allows the operator to get in motion with the tractor and leaves the hand immediately adjacent to the handlebar. I suppose this could be considered ergonomic efficiency. Second having the forward position to the rear means that fewer low branches get snagged as you mow around the forsythia and the lilac, etc. Regardless, I agree that holding the lever forward to engage reverse is a safety issue.
 
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