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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,

I purchased a rebuilt HOOF governor for my L. I'm going to need to manufacture some parts so I need a bit of help. Could someone please measure the connecting rod that goes from the governor spring to the pivot arm near the carb? Also the length of the pivot arm itself would be nice. I'm guessing most of the connecting rods are 1/8" steel rod? Or is it thicker? Thanks. Here are some pics including a pic of the measurement I need from a pic that is NOT my tractor. Thanks! Looking forward to putting this thing on my L!

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It's not real critical. The whole point of the governor is that it compensates.

If you set the throttle about in the middle of its travel, so that the bellcrank is about in the middle of its travel, and position the governor arm about in the middle of its travel or maybe a little forward of that (to account for spring stretch) then measure from the hole in the bellcrank to the end of the spring, you'll be good enough.

I can go measure some of mine, but I made many of them using that technique :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ahhh... excellent info. Thanks, JRD! Good to know it can be close. How about the materials? Do you think 1/8" rod will do it?
 

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He's correct, that is not critical, as long as you can get it hooked up and have plenty of travel in your lever on the handlebar. My tractor instead of having that bellcrank to change direction on the carb, has my throttle lever rod hooked to small metal chain. The chain goes around a small pulley mounted on the carb to change direction and put pressure on the governor arm.

Notice you really don't have direct control to the carb. The governor has control of the carb. You are just putting more or less pressure on the governor linkage to control the speed through that spring.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
OK I’m making the pivot that attaches down near the carburetor and swings back-and-forth. But I just noticed from some other photographs that it appears to be longer on one and than the other. See picture. Can someone give me some rough measurements for How long it is and where it actually pivots? Thanks
 

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Again, it's not real critical. I'd say it's about 3 inches long, with one leg being about 1-1/4 to the hole, and the other about an inch. The short side goes to the rod to the governer, IIRC.

None of this stuff is high precision. The entire purpose of the throttle handle, linkage, bellcrank, rod, and spring, is to put some forward pressure on the governor arm. That's trying to open the throttle. The spinning governor tries to close it. The governor adjusts to keep the open and close pressures balanced. That's it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Ok things have gone pretty well here but I have a question. The governor does appear to regulate speed and seems to keep the engine at about 2800 RPMs but it doesn't seem to want to respond very much to the throttle control. Maybe that's by design? Like it's pretty much just 2800 RPM's all the time. It doesn't even really relax all that much when you lower throttle. You have to actually push the governor arm back a bit if you want the engine to slow down. Also it's leaking a lot of grease from the governor arm shaft. Is that normal? See pics.

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Yea that looks like the governor on mine also. Just maybe someone will known were the fill plug and check oil level plugs are. I looked today and could find nothing anywhere. For something that is supposed to be checked every time the tractor is used they are well hidden.
 

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I'm pretty sure that's the newest style Hoof. "Permanently lubricated", for whatever that's worth. No fill plugs.

It shouldn't be leaking grease like that. There's a seal in there, which appears not to have made it into the rebuild. It's possible you'll be ok anyway. You don't need a huge amount of lube in there, really just enough to keep the bearing wet and the weights and sliding shaft from sticking. That much coming out suggests to me that somebody overfilled it. I don't have any of that model, so I'm not really sure. Steve, you listening? Will this thing settle into equilibrium, or does it need another rebuild to fix that seal?

On the setup: One of two things is wrong: 1. the rod from the governer arm to the throttle valve is adjusted wrong. 2. The rod you made up from the bellcrank to the spring is too short. I'm betting it's 1.

I probably should have explained a little more in post 2. The way the governor works is by balancing spring pressure, as applied by that rod and spring, against the pressure from the internal counterweights. If the spring is pulling forward, that's saying "open the throttle". That should be what's happening when you push the throttle level on the handlebar.

When you want lower power, and back off the handle, that should allow the spring to back off as well. When you're set at idle, the spring should be basically slack, with the throttle valve essentially closed.

In your pic 3, it looks like the governor arm is back as far as it can go, yet the throttle valve is wide open. When the governor arm is back, you want the throttle closed. There's a setscrew on the linkage where the rod controls the throttle valve. Try backing that off, and sliding about an inch of rod through there, then tightening it up. If in pic 3 your spring is slack, and you adjust it so the throttle plate is closed, you're pretty close to right. If none of that works, and your spring is still not slack, you need to lengthen the rod from the bellcrank to the spring.

One other thing: It looks like you've got a substantial bend in the fanbelt going around the governor pulley. That's not right. You should never use the governor as a belt tensioner, as side load on that bearing will wear it out prematurely. You want the belt tension right with the governor off, then adjust the governor so that the pulley is just riding on the outer surface of the belt, enough to turn it.
 

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My looks to be equipped the same other than the forward linkage at the carb. Will have to post a picture later as my phone is having fits with google.
 

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It actually was done that way on some models. See old thread L Governor

I can't find the manual referenced, since everything moved to gravelymanuals.com, but there's documentation out there someplace supporting the idea that the throttle linkage can be hooked straight to the spring.
 

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The major difference between the throttle on a governor equipped tractor and one without a governor is the direction the throttle operates/pulls. You will notice all the governor equipped tractors pull the throttle to the front of the tractor for increased rpms. A tractor without a governor pulls the throttle toward the back/operator to increase rpms.

The first pictures show a bellcrank to change the direction of the throttle pull. My tractor uses a pulley and small chain to change the direction. Both of these versions look like they take the original non governor throttle rod and use these other parts to change the direction it operates.

Looks like the other poster's tractor uses a Belden cable which can be flexed around to operate the proper direction. I wonder if the difference is a factory equipped governor tractor versus a retro-fit governor application?
 

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Thats the first governor Ive seen and they are more bulbus than I imagined lol!.
I have 2 L's and a LI and none of them have that chunk of something else to go wrong hanging on them....thank God.
Just the opinion on one novice.
If a body needs one Im sure they are great but I never would, cant believe how big they are tho.
 

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Thats the first governor Ive seen and they are more bulbus than I imagined lol!.
I have 2 L's and a LI and none of them have that chunk of something else to go wrong hanging on them....thank God.
Just the opinion on one novice.
If a body needs one Im sure they are great but I never would, cant believe how big they are tho.
Don't knock it till you try it. The governor is a great addition to the Gravely L, especially if you work them hard. For example if you are in tall grass, you have to open the throttle up to get through it. Then after you make it through the thick patch you are literally running after the tractor when it revs up after the heavy load is gone. With a governor you set the tractor at a comfortable cutting speed, when it hits the tall grass it opens the throttle by itself. When you are out of the tall grass it throttles it back down by itself. It's a wonderful thing.

I would have made the governor standard on all tractors, just like Briggs and Kohler and all the newer engines have a governor built in as standard. Most people don't know all the newer small engines even have a governor.
 

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There are virtually no small engines being made nowadays which don't have governors, other than chainsaws.

Some kinds of loads on a gravely don't really need a governor. Just mowing the lawn, for instance, isn't much of a load unless you've got a lot of hills. For heavier stuff, like brush hogging, rotary plowing, or especially snowblowing, lack of a governor is somewhere between an annoyance and a colossal pain in the butt. It really is a beautiful thing to hear the machine lean into something, and then calmly back itself down when the power isn't needed.
 
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