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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a guy I work with that has a Massey 35 Deluxe that he thinks is a 1965 or 1966.
He was wondering if it would run a tiller ok and if so how wide of a tiller should he look for?
I think he is looking at a garden area and for food plots.
Any input would be appreciated.
Terry T:thanku:
Thanks,
 

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I've never used one, but have watched a friend use one, so keep that in mind... That said, looking at the tractor specs, I don't see why it wouldn't run a 6' tiller. My friend was able to use his effectively with a Ford 861 (i think that was the model - about 40 horse) and now uses it with a Ford 1710. I think the MF 35 has 2 speed rear and a live PTO so I'm thinking it'll work.
 

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Five foot max

I have a guy I work with that has a Massey 35 Deluxe that he thinks is a 1965 or 1966.
He was wondering if it would run a tiller ok and if so how wide of a tiller should he look for?
I think he is looking at a garden area and for food plots.
Any input would be appreciated.
Terry T:thanku:
Thanks,
I've got two TO35 Deluxe tractors with the Continental Z134 gas engines. Also have a MF35 with a Perkins 152 diesel. A five foot tiller on any of them is about all they can handle unless you're just tilling soft sand. On new sod or hard packed soil - a five foot tiller works them to the max and is a hair too much - but bearable.

I use a 5 foot King Kutter. Besides the five foot width taking all the power a TO35 has to offer - the weight is also something to watch for. A TO35 without front wheel weights will pop wheelies pretty easy with a 5 foot tiller on the back and pointing up hill. My IH B-275s handle the tiller better then the TOs even though they are equal power.

It takes 7 horsepower per foot in new or tough soil. Do the math. A perfect TO35 can barely maintain 30 horse at 200 foot lbs. of torque.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok Thanks,
I will pass this info on to him.
I don't know if he has any front weight or not.
This is what he was looking for someone who had used one.
I had told him if there was a doubt the 5 foot would be the safest way.
That it would be better to take a little longer than not have enough power and have to back off and lap over.
Again Thanks,
Terry T
 

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. . . I don't see why it wouldn't run a 6' tiller. My friend was able to use his effectively with a Ford 861 (i think that was the model - about 40 horse) and now uses it with a Ford 1710. .
The Ford has much more engine with 172 cubic inches. The TO35 only has 134.

As to a 85 cubic inch Shibaura (Ford 1710) running a 6 foot tiller? I don't believe it unless it's tilling loose sand.

With a 6 foot tiller, the Ford 861 has near 29 cubic inches per foot. The Fergy TO35 has 22. The Ford/Shibaura 1710 has 14 - about half what the Ford has. 1710 also has 22 horse max that comes to 3 1/2 horse per foot of tiller. 5 horse is the usual minimum needed for loose soil and 7 horse for hard or new soil. Something does not add up unless this guy's Japanese tractor is magical.
 

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Ok Thanks,
I will pass this info on to him.
I don't know if he has any front weight or not.
This is what he was looking for someone who had used one.
I had told him if there was a doubt the 5 foot would be the safest way.
That it would be better to take a little longer than not have enough power and have to back off and lap over.
Again Thanks,
Terry T
If he has real tough soil - he's really better off with a 4 foot tiller with an off-set mount so his tire tracks get covered on one side. If he's just tilling fairly loose garden soil, the five footer is fine. A four foot tiller in hard soil needs 28-30 horse as it is.

I put Ford front wheel weights on one of my TO35s and it made a nice difference. I can actually go up a few hills frontwards now - when the tiller or snowblower is on the back - instead of having to back up all the hills.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was't sure how wide it was with the wheels dished in. But I figured it would take 5 ft to wipe out the tracks.
I don't know if his garden spot he is wanting to till is new or not ,but I'm sure the food plots he's wanting to do has not been tilled in years.
Thanks,
Terry T
 

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I was't sure how wide it was with the wheels dished in. But I figured it would take 5 ft to wipe out the tracks.
I don't know if his garden spot he is wanting to till is new or not ,but I'm sure the food plots he's wanting to do has not been tilled in years.
Thanks,
Terry T
The smaller tillers - like the 4 footers are mounted with an off-set to they cover the wheel tracks on one side.
 

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I'm not sure which it is.He just said it was a 35 Deluxe.Is there a HP difference?
Terry T
I don't recall Massey Ferguson 35 ever being offered in a model called "Deluxe." That was an option package with the Ferguson 35. The "Deluxe" option offered a live PTO, power steering, tachometer, etc. Has nothing to do with horsepower.

TO35 and MF35 have the same horsepower unless the MF35 has the Perkins diesel.

TO35 used a Continental 134 gas or a British Standard model 23 137 c.i. diesel.

MF35 used a Continental 134 gas, a British Standard model 23 137 c.i. diesel, a British Standard FE35 gas engine, or the 152 Perkins diesel. A few came with Multi-power for speed control.

MF35X came with the Perkins diesel only.
 

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I'm not sure which it is.He just said it was a 35 Deluxe.Is there a HP difference?
Terry T
You mention it being around a 1965. TO35 was made 1957-1961. MF35 was made 1960-1965. MF35X was made 1962-1964. MF135 was made 1964-1975.
 

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The Ford has much more engine with 172 cubic inches. The TO35 only has 134.

As to a 85 cubic inch Shibaura (Ford 1710) running a 6 foot tiller? I don't believe it unless it's tilling loose sand.

With a 6 foot tiller, the Ford 861 has near 29 cubic inches per foot. The Fergy TO35 has 22. The Ford/Shibaura 1710 has 14 - about half what the Ford has. 1710 also has 22 horse max that comes to 3 1/2 horse per foot of tiller. 5 horse is the usual minimum needed for loose soil and 7 horse for hard or new soil. Something does not add up unless this guy's Japanese tractor is magical.
No magic, but the soil around here is loose, to say the least, a lot like powder. He did have to add weights to the front, etc., but it seems to do fine.
 

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Here is my two cents

If he has a small acreage and is doing some personal landscaping and gardening
get a six foot to cover your foot print.
when doing sod go 3 inches first pass and down 3 again next pass. Not rocket science stuff. Unless he is doing a quarter section should not be an issue. In the garden next year he will go one pass. The same for weeding a wind shelter belt of trees.

I have a international 234 with 18 HP and use a 48 inch tiller on sod with no issues. It is a hydrostatic drive so go as slow as I have too. Do half a pass the first time if you have to. You usually have to do double passes to get equal depth due the way the tiller is constructed.

If you get a narrow tiller you dealing with the width crap all the time.

I have a 1959 to35 deluxe and it has the two stage clutch(live pto) and the speedometer. Thats what a deluxe is. Great tractor but I use the 234 as the tiller covers the tire tracks.

George
 
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