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Discussion Starter #1
So, my 1960ish 1010 was parked in September of 2018. I then came out to start it up for the first time last week. Usually that is not a problem. It goes all winter without even being plugged into a trickle charger and it will start right up. Well, this time it cranked, no problem, but simply would not fire at all.

So, I went through the standard "Is it fuel or spark" routine and finally shot some gas with an atomizer into the throttle opening as I cranked. It fired and actually ran just fine, as long as I kept the throttle open and kept squirting. But as soon as I stopped squirting, it died. So, obviously it's the carb. Here's the deal, though:

The carb is a TSX 809. I took it off and cleaned everything. I removed all Jets and the main nozzle (which was filthy). I cleaned all the holes using carb cleaner and a very fine wire. Everything was clean as a whistle. I even let gas run through the gas line for a bit to clean it out. And yes, the first gas to come out was downright orange.

I then connected everything, unscrewed the bottom bowl drain to make sure there was gas in it. There was. I then tried to start it up and nothing was fixed. Again, not one fire, though If you sprayed gas in it would fire and run.

Any thoughts? The only thing I'm left with is taking it apart again and seeing if some jet or internal nozzle inlet somewhere is still plugged up.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Gravity feed or fuel pump?
Gravty. BTW, I shot compressed air into the main nozzle and air shot through the small hole that goes to which I removed and cleaned as part of my cleaning. I basically shot compressed air through every orifice I could find .
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
For those interested, I fixed it. It was a bear of a problem to find. The solution is as follows:

When you separate the halves of the carb, there are two small holes in the bottom half in the section in the middle that juts out between the sides of the fuel chamber. The one closest to the tip if this area is the smallest. it is a vent to a sort of air chamber on the outside of the main fuel nozzle. It's function is to allow air into the fuel as it's sucked into the fuel air mixture, causing it to break up into a mist, and also allow the fuel to be sucked up into the venturi. But mine was plugged.

When I removed the brass nozzle shaft, I could see at the end of the air shaft a clump of rust. I also noticed that if I forced air from the top, none got through. I used small wire to break up the rust and clean it all out. Air was able to blow through. I had to do it from the bottom. A wire crammed in from the top would have a hard stop because the air shaft doesn't go clean through. It enters the area at the bottom from an angled "side" of the shaft. A wire simply hit the hard steel bottom of the hole. I had to scrape it out.

After re-assembling, the tractor started right up.
 

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Persistence paid off and thanks for posting the answer to the problem. There are enough of those carbs out there and I'm sure others that find this will be appreciative.
MikeC
 

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I was guessing you missed a clogged passage and was going to suggest you soak it in a carb cleaner overnight then check all the passages again.

I am glad you posted the solution.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I was guessing you missed a clogged passage and was going to suggest you soak it in a carb cleaner overnight then check all the passages again.

I am glad you posted the solution.
That was going to be my last resort. I don't know if it would have worked with that rust blob, though.

The fun part is that I got very intimate with exactly how that carb works. The test I did to make sure it was about fuel making it up the nozzle was , I took the "power" needle valve completely out, allowing an "air entrance passage" into the carb and intake manifold separate from the main air intake. I then completely blocked the air intake into the carb and gave the starter a short kick. The suction was VERY powerful and the engine immediately started firing, but as soon as I took my hand off, it died.

That told me it was worth it to give the teardown another try. I then carefully went through and examined the carb repair manual I had downloaded, and it actually brought the focus to that particular air shaft - at least for me. And there was that pile of rust. :)
 

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Stick a magnet to the bottom of the gas tank,on the outside is fine,away from the fuel outlet,that will help stop any silty fine rust dust from getting past the fuel filter and into the carb again..

I used this trick on many old vehicles I bought that had sat a long time and had a lot of that stuff in the gas tank--despite removing and flushing the tank out good,I was putting several fuel filters on them in only a short time due to them clogging up with rust that looked like powdered bricks..an old speaker magnet "fixed" it!.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Stick a magnet to the bottom of the gas tank,on the outside is fine,away from the fuel outlet,that will help stop any silty fine rust dust from getting past the fuel filter and into the carb again..

I used this trick on many old vehicles I bought that had sat a long time and had a lot of that stuff in the gas tank--despite removing and flushing the tank out good,I was putting several fuel filters on them in only a short time due to them clogging up with rust that looked like powdered bricks..an old speaker magnet "fixed" it!.
That's a great idea! And as a bass player and hi-fi nut from the 70's if there is one thing I have all over the place, it's speaker magnets. :)
 
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