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GramPa
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I still have my old Elgine Hafa Horse engine. I still need a buzz coil high heat. I seen this on the web from a 1970 magazine and wonder if anyone made one in the day and if it worked. Thanks.

"The following antique gas engine repair tip will help you roll your own spark coil in one hour or less.
Buy or use your own methods to secure a common carriage bolt that is 7/8 or 1 inch in diameter and 4-3/4 inches in length. Cut off the head of the bolt and leave on the squared part of the bolt so that you have the full 4-3/4 inches in length. Threads on other end of bolt do not harm so forget them and continue to work.
Purchase one-half pound roll of 18 AWG Single Beldsol Magnet Wire (number 8049). This should be your total cost to make the coil. Wrap the bolt with two layers of plastic electrical tape from end to end. Measure 3/4 inch in from each end, on top of the electrical tape make a mark at the measured points with Band Aid tape. Put one end of bolt in a vise with the mark even with the vise-jaws. Now take the coil of Beldsol wire and roll some off. Measure six inches from the end of the wire and put this measured point against the bolt tight against the vise-jaws. Proceed to roll the rest of the wire by hand tightly around the boll working toward the mark at the other end of the bolt. Now start winding a second layer on lop of the first layer and work your windings back to the vise-jaws. Keep your winding tightly spaced, but if some of the windings keep slipping down into the layer below the layer you are winding, don't worry, but keep winding as the coil is not that critical. Continue your windings from end mark to mark until you have used up the whole coil of wire. You should end up with a second 6 inch pig-tail of wire at the vise-jaws, which is your point of beginning, but many layers deeper. If you cannot make the last layer and have a 6 inch pig-tail, then unwind this layer back to the vise-jaws and measure out 6 inches from the jaws and cut off the excess, as one layer is not that critical. Secure enough hard wood or plywood of 3/4-inch thickness to cut two blocks, 3 inches square. Bore a hole to fit the diameter of your bolt in the center of each block. Cut a third piece of wood 3 inches wide and 6 inches long. This will be the base. Bore two holes 1/4 inch in diameter in one of the 3 inch square blocks. Bore the holes 1/4 inch from the edge of the block and 1 inch apart. Secure two bolts of 1/4 inch diameter and 1-1/2 inches in length with two nuts each bolt.
Now assemble the two blocks, one on each end of the bolt to the marks, which is now the ends of the coil. Then compress the end blocks to the coil ends and hold tightly by hand and nail on the bottom piece of wood to the end blocks. You now have the coil sandwiched between two blocks of wood which are nailed to a wood base. Now insert the 1/4 inch bolts through their holes in the one end block with the bolt heads facing the coil. Take the wire pig-tails, one to each bolt head, and make a turn or two under the head of the bolt and cut off the excess wire. Now put on one nut to the other end of each bolt and tighten securely as this is a permanent operation. Take the second nut, one to each bolt and you have a sandwich between the nuts for a cheap, but efficient terminal for your engine hook-up wires. You may now make one wrapping of the plastic electrical tape around the coil for protection against scarring the shellacked finish on the wire, but even this is not critical. You may now paint the whole coil and wood, for looks, as even liquid is not a critical factor to the coil."
 

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GramPa
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1,043 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
http://www.old-engine.com/maglco.htm

The COIL that is used with an igniter is only a single winding although you will see some engine folks using the primary side of an automotive coil for convenience sake. This coil is made up of a long iron core wound with a considerable length of low resistance insulated copper wire. Just about any soft iron cored coil will provide enough inductance to snap a spark on the igniter, the length of the core and the number of turns of insulated wire determining the strength of the spark. The coil of wire is wound over a soft iron core to increase its inductance (self induction) many fold over an air core. Soft iron does NOT hold a magnetic charge well and therefore when the circuit is opened, the rapidly collapsing field provides an "inductive kick" on the order of many hundreds of volts

I'm still learning and didn't know the answer till I found this.


wouldn't an ignition coil need a primary and a secondary winding?

TMM
 

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You're making a low tension coil for an ignitor fired engine. What you need is a buzz coil. They're readily available on ebay and at farm auctions. You can find a lot of antique engine & tractor info here:http://www.smokstak.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=5
There's also a classified section where I'm sure you can find a buzz coil.

John
 

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GramPa
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've seen other members on the smokstak that have been looking for years for this particular coil...the closest I can find to the type needed is currently on ebay but it is too short...I need one 4 inches long minimum.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/LOW-TENSION...576?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item27c1075840

IF someone has one kicking around from an old military flame thrower that would work, please let me know.

You're making a low tension coil for an ignitor fired engine. What you need is a buzz coil. They're readily available on ebay and at farm auctions. You can find a lot of antique engine & tractor info here:http://www.smokstak.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=5
There's also a classified section where I'm sure you can find a buzz coil.

John
 

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GramPa
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

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Finding an exact replacement will probably be difficult and expensive. Keep checking Ebay and Smokstak. You could build one inside a round tube of pvc or abs and make it look somewhat original. Here's plans to build one using a bosch relay. I've built one of these and they do work. Another option if you want to show it and have it look semi "correct" is to make a fake round coil and use a square buzz coil hidden under the engine maybe.

Good luck

John
 

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GramPa
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Second suggestion looks like my best option...appreciate the idea. Thanks. "here's plans to build one using a bosch relay"....this didn't show up in post.

Finding an exact replacement will probably be difficult and expensive. Keep checking Ebay and Smokstak. You could build one inside a round tube of pvc or abs and make it look somewhat original. Here's plans to build one using a bosch relay. I've built one of these and they do work. Another option if you want to show it and have it look semi "correct" is to make a fake round coil and use a square buzz coil hidden under the engine maybe.

Good luck

John
 
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