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Discussion Starter #1
What works best for snowplow protection for you folks. Something homemade and photos would be nice. Swinging post, V shaped protector. Seems to make sense not letting the crap from the plow hit the box in the first place. My mailbox is a pretty big target so there is a lot of surface area
 

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I don't have a dog in this hunt but did retire 3 yrs. ago from The Solar Group, Inc. the worlds largest mailbox manufacturer division of Gibraltar Ind. and unfortunately we never were able to build a post or mailbox combo that could withstand a snow plow, at least while I was there. There are some after market players that supply some flex mounts for posts like this: Amazon.com : Sno-flex Mailbox Post Spring | Heavy-Duty Protection from Snow Pushed by Plows | for Mail Boxes with 4x4 Wooden Posts | Easy Installation, Hardware Included, Automatic Reset : Garden & Outdoor but I can't say if they truly work. As others stated you may want to try plywood or even a pallet on the side the plow will be coming from. If you decide to completely enclose your mailbox in brick/mortar/concrete make sure you wrap the walls of the mailbox in heavy plastic or similar barrier so the acid from the mortar/concrete does not come in contact with any metal mailbox. Good luck.(y)
 

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I see quite a few pretty stout looking walls built from wood acting as a shield for both the post and box. I keep seeing more of them, so I guess they must work. We’ve always lived on a road with low speed limits, so i’ve Never had to test one myself.

When we moved in a couple months ago, I just threw up a cheap box and post to get us by. I’d like a standoutish box and post. When we had the house built, the concrete guys made a fine cut out of the basement wall just over 6 feet long, and about 6”x6” or so, with a piece of rebar running the length of it. I bet I can weld a plate to the end of it, and mount a nice box to the plate. There’s lots of prominent concrete features on and in the house that a concrete mailbox post will nicely compliment.
 

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I've had my mailbox take a direct hit by the plow twice. Each time I hammered it back into shape.

I had a vandal hit it twice with a baseball bat too and both times I hammered it back into shape.

If you are only talking about protecting it from the snow hitting it and not the plow blade, then something like a brick surround should work. Ain't going to withstand a direct hit from the plow.

One guy down the road built a swivel into the post with a long arm and when he anticipates the plow, he turns it sideways.
 

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close enuff works for me
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The problem is not the plow ,,when you are on a 4 lane road and 2 lanes worth of heavy wet snow hit the mail box at 45MPH it will break the box off the pole, or snap the pole.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
That's my problem. The plow doesn't hit it. It's like the surfs up in Hawaii, only it's ice and slush. I also understand it's a game with the operators to see how many they can take out.
Would like to put posts in, but there is underground in the area, so that means calling Miss Utility
 

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I put 4x4 in this year to keep mine from being re-arranged by the snow plow operators. Sunk it nearly 4 ft so that should keep it in place. We aren't allowed to do concrete anchors anymore due to postal regulations.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Maybe this design would work Have plenty of 1/8 diamond plate and 2 x 2 x 1/4 wall square tubing .
 

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The snow plow takes my mail box out yearly. Across the road is a steep bank, and then there's a ditch and then road; so my mail is anchored on the bank with a horizontal pole to reach road. I'm thinking of making it swing up.

I've also had vandals with the baseball bat. My high school friend constantly had vandals. One time he had enough, and when he replaced the box he banged out the old box and filled it with concrete. He set the two boxes on the post and sure enough the vandals tried crushing the first (concrete filled) box. The guy in the back seat of the vandal's car got hurt, as the broken bat hit him. My friend was sued. Not sure how it turned out as the lawsuit was prolonged and I lost contact.
 

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Kioti SCUT
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I've had the same problem with "waves" of snow coming off the plow and wiping out my mailbox. It happened several times a year.

I finally bought a "break-away" style hard plastic mailbox at Lowe's. The top section slides onto the post base. When the snow hits, the mailbox pops off the base and lands in the snowbank, unharmed. I just dust it off, and slide it back into the grooves on the post base. It still gets hit with snow, but always survives. Cal

2443862
 

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When my wife and I were first married, we rented a farm house for 3 years. My mail box was knocked at least 3 times. It stood on a 4x4 post buried in the ground. Afetr the last time, I sink a railroad tie into the ground. It was still standing when we moved out. May not get by with that today.
 

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Dont know why a railroad tie will not work. Would be no harder hitting than a masonry post filled with concrete.
But if in question a stop at the post office will solve it.
 

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My mailbox is protected from the plows by a big stump on the other side of the driveway. It was stolen once and returned under suspicious circumstances months later.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
My grandparents, realizing that they were pregnant with their 7th child and barely having enough room for them and the 6 they already had (ages 1–12 in 1969), sold their 3br 2ba house in the city and had a 5br 4ba house built in what was, at the time, the eastern suburbs of Memphis, TN. It was (and still is) a great neighborhood.
Fast forward to 1977ish. The neighbor directly across the street was an older lady who had an identical twin sister. At least once a month, she would back out of her driveway in her Lincoln Continental and absolutely demolish grandpa’s mailbox and its wooden post. He would go knock on her door and she would dismiss it, blaming her identical twin.
Grandpa then had a brilliant idea. He sourced an 8 foot length of railroad track. Not a wooden tie, but the steel track itself. He, along with two of my uncles, drove down to the metal yard and loaded this behemoth into the back of grandpa’s Ford Galaxie station wagon. Apparently it was quite the precarious drive and the rear suspension of that poor Galaxie got worked like it was never intended to. It took 7 people to get that piece of track out of the back of the station wagon and into the hole. He sunk it 4 feet into the ground with concrete all the way up to the lip of the hole. He put his shiny new mailbox on top and waited.
A few days later there was a tremendous crash from the front yard. When he got outside, grandpa discovered the across-the-street neighbor spitting mad next to her Lincoln Continental. She had hit the mailbox post dead-center in her trunk, which was now smashed in. The car’s bumper was hanging off one side and twisted badly.
She asked grandpa who was going to pay for the damage to her car. He replied “Maybe your twin sister will cover it”.

Apparently, mailboxes have short lives everywhere. Took this off web to share. There are all kinds of ideas out there. LEGAL? Don't know

I can attest to this next one. Good neighbor that did tractor repair back in the 50-60's. His mailbox was on a raised area that attracted the younger fellas like a magnet. It was run over numerous times. You could actually follow the wheel tracks in his lawn to the target
Fed up with the mailbox replacements, his next step was to bury a 12" x 4" H beam in concrete. Down 6' Remember this mailbox was on a bank, so the H bean only had to stick up about 12" above the ground. A Toyota pickup truck headed for the new target. The H beam cut the floorboards like a can opener, threw the rear axel into the middle of the road and upset the truck. Landed dead center on the yellow line. Police followed the tracks across to the raised area were the target lay. All decided it was deliberate. Nothing done. Good ole days. Today a little different
 

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Around here, when folks give up after multiple plow hits, they put the post into a 5-gallon bucket and set that on the ground. The whole thing will get pushed over, but rarely gets damaged, as it's all landing in snow. Here's a pic of one that I had to do this for, after it got knocked over.
IMG_20170124_195835440.jpg


My first house was on a street that was a favorite target of the baseball bat idiots. The mailbox (from the prior owner) was on a steel post, but was completely mangled from years of abuse.

My FIL helped me out, we put a wooden (4x4) post behind the fieldstone wall that ran across the front of the yard. We then ran a really, really long horizontal piece over the wall, and put the mailbox at the end of that.

Mailman could easily reach it (going at very slow speed), but there was no way for the baseball players to get their car close enough to it at full speed to reach it. My neighbors got hit twice after we installed this, and ours was untouched.

Mike
 
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