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You could also just back the truck up near that embankment in your photo and load it from there.
 

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You could also just back the truck up near that embankment in your photo and load it from there.
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That looks decent-Al--but doesn't it add a lot of weight to the tail gate--when you fold it up??
glenn
 

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Glenn, I would say it adds about 12-14 lbs., but at least I don't have to worry about the ramp bowing.
 

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Shoot, that is a bummer, sorry :( At least 2 boards would be easy and fairly cheap, at least. Maybe you or a friend could weld some of that mesh back in-place? That, plus adding the boards, might get you back in business.
 
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If you mount a few treated boards under the mesh, side to side, that would provide plenty of support Without sticking up above the mesh. On the other hand, flooring would also let you load landscaping material.
 

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Did mesh removal years ago on my 5x10, totally worth it!
Did you put boards down? My last utility trailer had plywood. And the one I bought last year has boards. So my only experience with mesh is on the tailgate of my current trailer. What's better about removing the mesh? I can certainly see boards/plywood being better for hauling mulch, dirt, etc, of course. But if you were moving equipment, I wonder if the mesh might be kinda nice, for grip.
 

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You don't want to use any type of metal for decking. Its slippery when its wet.
Almost as slippery as wood with wet mold/algae growing on it.
Both have advantages and disadvantages. Mine with expanded metal is all bowed down between the supports and starting to rust.
My wood deck trailer is getting a little punky.
 

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I was loading the Zero turn today and the mesh failed in the back corner. I guess I'll either put 2 treated boards on each side over the mesh or take the mesh off and floor it all
with boards.
Cannon
Yup, that's very common with the low-grade mesh the trailer manufacturer uses. My 5x8 has failed in several places. One of my next projects is to remove the mesh and use wood planks or decking. The ramp is wrecked so I removed it. I bought 3,000lb aluminum ramps to replace it. I actually welded on a hand winch today for it. Should make it easier to pull a snowmobile on.
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Road surface Vehicle

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
If the mesh was strong enough I would prefer it to the wood. Before I bought this I used a 10 foot tilt trailer with a wood floor. If it was wet there was not enough traction to get to where it would tip down, way to much drama. I haven't had any trouble with the mesh on the tailgate. There is a piece of angle that bears the weight all the way up, see post #1. Light duty always has some disadvantages but being able to unhook it and roll it by hand into a tight place is nice.
Cannon
 

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I would go for pounding it back into place, then welding it down, and then perhaps weld/bolt a strip of angle iron underneath it, if that area regularly have more weight over it (like say, a tractor regularly goes over that spot).

When I replaced the wood planks on my 18' trailer, I painted them with a deck paint with bits in it, to provide a rougher surface, as I use it in the winter with snow/ice on it, and it somewhat helps, but also has worn off in a bunch of spots, from tires spinning or the equipment shifting slightly during travel...
 

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You don't want to use any type of metal for decking. Its slippery when its wet.
But the mesh, depending on the orientation, should give pretty good traction due to all the edges, I would think? With the "lines" of the mesh going left/right, I would imagine that would do OK for forward/back traction. No?
 

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I would go for pounding it back into place, then welding it down, and then perhaps weld/bolt a strip of angle iron underneath it, if that area regularly have more weight over it (like say, a tractor regularly goes over that spot).

When I replaced the wood planks on my 18' trailer, I painted them with a deck paint with bits in it, to provide a rougher surface, as I use it in the winter with snow/ice on it, and it somewhat helps, but also has worn off in a bunch of spots, from tires spinning or the equipment shifting slightly during travel...
I like the idea of re-attaching the mesh, and putting angle iron under it. I've debated doing that on the mesh tailgate of my trailer, but it already has lengthwise supports that line up almost under the tractor wheels. The wheels are just a little outboard of the supports, but they're very close. So I've held off for now, as it would be somewhat involved to add supports, and hopefully they're not needed.

I have seen people mention attaching stuff like mesh, chicken wire, etc, to wooden ramps, or trailer boards, for traction. Staple it down, or whatever method you prefer. I have also bought the gritty traction tape strips, which I put on my car ramps, and worked awesome to add grip. Before it was difficult to drive the tractor up the ramps. Trying to back up the ramps, the tractor tires would just spin on the metal ramps. But now it goes right up. If the boards were sealed (I sealed my trailer decking after buying it), the tape might be an easy & quick option.
 
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I hooked the trailer up View attachment 2481620 View attachment 2481621 and drove one of my old Craftsman mowers onto it. With the Craftsman deck all the way up (which is not very high) the deck cleared about 1/2 inch. It probably helped that the hitch on the truck is to high causing the front of the trailer is higher than the back. That would decrease the angle of the ramp. I may get a hitch that drops a few inches just to get it closer to level.
Cannon
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Can't you just flip the hitch itself upside down in the reciever. The way you have it now is a little too high, i think--giving you some negative tongue weight.
 

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Did you put boards down? My last utility trailer had plywood. And the one I bought last year has boards. So my only experience with mesh is on the tailgate of my current trailer. What's better about removing the mesh? I can certainly see boards/plywood being better for hauling mulch, dirt, etc, of course. But if you were moving equipment, I wonder if the mesh might be kinda nice, for grip.
I cut the mesh out and ground the welded spots down, then installed treated deck boards. No issues with grip. It was a cleaner install to me than keeping the mesh in place.

For moving furniture or other nicer stuff, it's good to have a smoother floor.
 

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From what I've seen people moving equipment in pouring down rain and snow they slip and slide all over the place loading and unloading with a metal floor. If you get mud or ice on the deck its even worst.
Yup. Even for my ramps, which are mostly mesh, around the edges and down the middle (it's a split ramp) is flat steel, and there is zero traction on that part in the winter, I need to make sure to both keep the equipment wheels and my feet off it.
 
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