My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,552 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey grill masters, I am always wanting to expand my horizons and would like to know the ingredients you use for a dry rub mix and also ingredients for bake beans if you're willing to share your secrets. Thanks, Rudy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
Google Wampus beans, or Kerrie's Hog Apple Baked beans. Both have a LOT of stuff, but are a hit. (Most of my circle like the Wampus beans better, I make them more, I prefer the Hog Apple beans myself, so either is fine).

I usually go commercial on the rubs, as I am in a trade circle for that stuff. I have way too much on hand to justify making my own, so no help there...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,552 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the bean tip, yeah I also use some commercial rubs but also lightly coat with brown sugar after applying the rub depending on the meat we're cooking.
 

·
Mountain Mike
Joined
·
127 Posts
My go to rub for ribs and pork butt is the 8+3+1+1 mix.

8 Parts brown sugar
3 parts sea salt (or Kosher)
1 part chili powder

The remaining part is anything your heart desires whether it be 1 ingredient or a mix of ingredients; sweet paprika, cumin, onion/garlic powder, ground coffee, cinnamon, Old Bay seasoning, and the list goes on. Experiment with it until you get the flavor profile that you enjoy.

As far as the beans go, I'll open up a can or two of Bush's Original Style beans and doctor it up with brown sugar and molasses. I'll park the pan under some ribs or pork and let the drippings take a part in it all. Stir occasionally and let cook a couple of hours in the smoker. You can add bell pepper, onions or whatever to it if that's your thing. I always get complements on my beans.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
Thanks for sharing the rub mix Gone2dMtns.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,205 Posts
I usually smoke something just about every weekend, and I honestly dont think I have used the same rub twice. I always make my own, and I try something new each time usually. Once you figure out the basic flavor profiles that go good with each meat, its fun to experiment from there. I use a lot of brown sugar, coarse salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, chili powder and curry powder. Yellow curry is insanely good on beef and chicken (dont need much though).
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,205 Posts
Ya know it just never occurred to me to try curry powder but I'm glad you mentioned it. I'm going to give that a go on the next chicken that I roast. :trink39:
Please report back!

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
I smoke about a pound and a half of pork belly cut into 1/2 inch strips the night before, then dice it, dice a yellow onion, dice 5 cloves garlic, shred about a tablespoon of fresh ginger, add 2 tablespoons black pepper, then 2 cans bushs original beans. Throw it in the oven for 3.5 hours, reduce on the stove after that. Never had any complaints.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,552 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I smoke about a pound and a half of pork belly cut into 1/2 inch strips the night before, then dice it, dice a yellow onion, dice 5 cloves garlic, shred about a tablespoon of fresh ginger, add 2 tablespoons black pepper, then 2 cans bushs original beans. Throw it in the oven for 3.5 hours, reduce on the stove after that. Never had any complaints.
oh man, that sounds scrumptious.:thThumbsU
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,941 Posts
Here are some rub recipes I've used. made up batches of each a couple times and given to family in gift exchange at Christmas.

Blackened Seasoning Mix X 2

Original recipe makes 1 /4 cup Change Servings
1 1/2 tablespoons paprika
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon onion powder
1 tablespoon ground dried thyme
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 teaspoon dried oregano




Cajun Spice Mix X 1

Ingredients

1/4 cup Kosher salt
1/4 cup cayenne
1/4 cup paprika
1/4 cup garlic granules
1/4 cup ground black pepper
2 tablespoons onion granules
2 tablespoons oregano, dry
2 tablespoons thyme, dry



Texas Dry Rub
¼ C salt
½ T white pepper
1 T celery salt
3 T ground cumin seed
3 T paprika
2 T black pepper
½ T garlic powder
½ T lemon peel, (Zest)
1 T cayenne pepper
1 T dry mustard


X1 means 1 measure of each, X2 means double the amounts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
809 Posts
Google Wampus beans, or Kerrie's Hog Apple Baked beans. Both have a LOT of stuff, but are a hit. (Most of my circle like the Wampus beans better, I make them more, I prefer the Hog Apple beans myself, so either is fine).

I usually go commercial on the rubs, as I am in a trade circle for that stuff. I have way too much on hand to justify making my own, so no help there...
Where do you get Wampus or Kerries Hog Apple Baked beans - any local grocery stores? Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Hey grill masters, I am always wanting to expand my horizons and would like to know the ingredients you use for a dry rub mix and also ingredients for bake beans if you're willing to share your secrets. Thanks, Rudy
Well, guess I'll make my first post a doozie! I do a lot of smoking on my Big Green Egg; and have evolved my own rib rubb. Here is my recipe and my technique.

Here you go!

Baby back ribs on the Big Green Egg or your own brand of smoker

INGREDIENTS

2 Slabs nice meaty baby back ribs, thawed, rinsed and patted dry
olive oil or Pam; spray can works best
Rib Rub
Turkey bake-in bag
chunk charcoal
CURED wood chunks for smoking; I prefer about 1/3 Mesquite, 1/3 blackjack oak and 1/3 pecan. Blackjack isn't available everywhere, so regular oak is OK. Hickory is good also. I never use green wood nor do I soak mine.

Lay the ribs in a cookie sheet, bony side up. Spray a fine coat of olive oil on the ribs and add a generous coating of your rubb. I use the #2 almost exclusively.

Turn the ribs over, spray the other side with the olive oil and generously coat the meaty side with the rub. Place into the bake-in bag overnight in the frige. I like to prepare them the day before if I can, but I don't always have that luxury.

I usually add a few chunks of wood to the smoker before I add the burning charcoal on top. I use the chunk charcoal in the Egg, and I start it using the chimney device so I don't have to use charcoal lighter. Add the hot charcoal to the smoker and place the rest of the smoking wood on top. I usually use about 2 or 3 medium size chunks of each on top of the coals. Mesquite is a great smoking wood, but it doesn't take a lot so go easy with it until you learn how much to use.

When the coals are ready, I place the ribs on the grill bony side down. If I cook more than 2 slabs, I use a rib rack but prefer they lie flat. I also cook directly over the coals instead of indirect because I like them to brown a bit. If you insist on a brush on sauce, I recommend Woody's Cooking Sauce.

I set the smoker to cook at about 250 degrees Farenheit or a bit below. It takes about 2 and 1/2 to 3 hours usually for baby backs; much more and they will just fall apart. I start checking them after about 2 hours. The hardest part is deciding when they are done; when a toothpick penetrates the meat easily they are done; look for the ribs to starting pulling away from the ends of the bones.

I like to let them sit for a few minutes until they cool before slicing them up. If you are transporting them say to Grandma's house, wrap them in aluminum foil, and then in a beach towel or two and put them in your small beer cooler. They will stay warm for a couple hours.

Enjoy.

A few comments on rubs...There are a couple commercial rubs I like very much. The first is Bad Byron's Butt Rubb. It is an excellent rub, but it is too spicy for most folks, especially the kids. I also like Cain's BBQ Rub; it is milder and has a great flavor, but it does contain MSG. I have formulated my own rubs; the recipes are below. The # 1 is as close to Bad Byron's Butt Rubb as I could get, but here again, it's fairly spicy hot. The #2 is what I use almost exclusively any more; not too hot for the kids and everyone seems to like it really well.

Sorry, these recipes make a pretty good size batch, but I use a lot of the #2. If you want less, you'll have to go to the conversion charts and cut it down some. When I'm cooking just for myself and Sharn Jean, I usually add a little extra garlic directly to the ribs during the prep phase. There are a lot of prep variations I have used; I often will spread a couple tablespoons of yellow mustard on the ribs, gives them just a hint of vinegar, but here again, you can get too much if you aren't careful.


D.G.'s #1 Rib Rub

1 Cup Paprika
2/3 Cup Black pepper ( mix of regular and coarse ground)
1/2 Cup Granulated Garlic
3 TBSP Salt (fine sea salt; no Iodine added)
3 TBSP Granulated Onion
3 TBSP Chipotle Powder


D.G.'s #2 Rib Rub

1 Cup Paprika
2/3 Cup Black Pepper (I use coarse ground)
1/2 Cup Granulated Garlic
2/3 Cup Brown Sugar (light)
1/3 Cup Ginger (ground, dry)
3 TBSP Salt ( I use fine sea salt; no Iodine added)
3 TBSP Granulated Onion
3 TBSP Chipotle Powder
3 TBSP Lemon Pepper
3 TBSP Celery Seed
 

·
Make Smoke, Boil Water!
Joined
·
1,615 Posts
I used to do a lot of barbecuing and roasting over 'real fire'. One of the very best dry rubs I ever found was made by Stephanie Izard, sold through https://thislittlegoat.com/

I did a Prime Rib with their rub and it was the best thing we'd ever had. Did not dry it before, but instead put the rub on (along with some salt) and let it hang out uncovered in the fridge for 24 hours.

I don't do much cooking now; my wife is disabled and the workload at home just doesn't permit a lot of this kind of thing now.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top