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I'm using Scotch Super 33+ today. I was 78 degrees today when I installed some. I few minutes later it was falling off, the glue was melting off. ???? I tried the Lowes pro tape same thing too. What's the best stuff to use?
 

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Scotch branded tapes are about all I ever use due to their consistent performance. Somehow, I don't think that cool temperature of 78℉ was the cause of the poor adhesion. What was the humidity like? How old was the tape and under what conditions did you store it?
 

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And, what were you "installing" it on? I used 33+ in my automotive business for 18 years, and never had an adhesion problem with it. I still use it on things today, it's the best there is. Sounds like you're trying to put it over something oily or with a solvent residue on it.
 

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The best electrical tape is Scotch Super 33+ or 88. You have to be careful with 88 because it can actually cut into the jacketing on coax cable.

If it failed you. It was old. Try not to keep it too long. Always be sure to make the last wrap not under tension. That prevents it from pulling itself free and acting like a flag in the breeze.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Scotch branded tapes are about all I ever use due to their consistent performance. Somehow, I don't think that cool temperature of 78℉ was the cause of the poor adhesion. What was the humidity like? How old was the tape and under what conditions did you store it?
Brand new tape, stored in a cool basement. High humidity must of been the problem then.
 

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Mike, As stated, Scotch 33+ is one of the best, if not THEE best tapes on the market. I've used it for 45 +/- years without problems and this was in 20º temps, 95º temps, and everything in between! I'm thinking oil more than humidity, either on your hands or on the wire.

Spray parts cleaner on a rag, paper towel, etc, and wipe wire down. ALLOW TO DRY and tape. It's also good practice to cut tape when you're through wrapping...don't just pull it to snap it off. Bob
 

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Mike, As stated, Scotch 33+ is one of the best, if not THEE best tapes on the market. I've used it for 45 +/- years without problems and this was in 20º temps, 95º temps, and everything in between! I'm thinking oil more than humidity, either on your hands or on the wire.
:ditto:

Spray parts cleaner on a rag, paper towel, etc, and wipe wire down. ALLOW TO DRY and tape. It's also good practice to cut tape when you're through wrapping...don't just pull it to snap it off. Bob
This
 

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I've used all sorts of electrical tape, cheap and expensive. One thing that causes many issues it putting it on something that has oily residue on it. Scotch and other high end tapes work the best, cheap tapes not so much.

I have a little roll of 3M Scotch 2242 rubber tape that seems to be the best I've used but I can't find it locally these days so use it very sparingly. It stretches and adheres to itself. Makes a really good covering.
 

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I’ve had electrical tape adhesive break down in electrical boxes over time or when it was exposed to diesel fuel, gas, and some oils.

I did a quick search online for rubber/sealing tape and found it at most stores like Home Depot, Lowe’s, and the like. I also found various sizes, lengths, and temps at Amazon. The old stuff used to be pretty good sealing out water, but you have to cut it off if you ever need back into the connection. I know there’s also a heat shrinkable tape for sealing power cables, similar to shrink tubing with adhesive.
 

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I can only concur with the others: you are using the best already. Maybe the store you purchased it from had it sitting on the shelf too long? I tend to use heat shrink tubing everywhere I can, but if I have to use black tape, its Scotch 33 or 88. That self vulcanizing rubber tape is pretty good stuff too but way more expensive.
 

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Hey, just a question here. Is there a heat shrink tubing available in a size large enough that could be used to cover house wiring splices? Seem like this would be a great use for it.
 

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Hey, just a question here. Is there a heat shrink tubing available in a size large enough that could be used to cover house wiring splices? Seem like this would be a great use for it.
Biggest I remember seeing was 3” or 4”, but it comes in 1/2”, 1”, 1 1/2”, 2”. Electrical suppliers also carry a rubber boot with a tab to a loop. Are you thinking of putting it over a wirenut? If so, you don’t need it.

If you didn’t know, there’s regular heatshrink and heatshrink with sealant on the inside for making water sealed connections. You shrink it then squeeze over wires to get the sealant to flow around the wires and bond to sealant from the opposite side.
 

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Nah, I was just asking if there was large heat shrink around. Should have know McMaster would have similar.

Back in mid 1960s, in a rural area hunting cabin, I spliced some underground 220v cable going to a pump by using a two part plastic mold, and an epoxy mix. The mold was made to fit around the flat cable. Once filled and cured, the mold was stripped off and this was supposed to be a water proof joint.

Not sure if this is used any more, but the place was sold 30 years later, and the cable was still in service then.
 

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Yeah, I learned the hard way after years of buying cheap Menards and Harbor Freight tapes that the only, ONLY way to go is the Scotch brand.
 

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Not to dig up and old dog, but I have used 3M Scotch 88T for years. It's a communications grade tape used by most telephone companies on their installations. I worked as a central office installer for years, and that's what we were required to use by almost ever telephone company we worked for. I somehow ended up with several rolls when I retired.
 

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Plymouth Premium Grey.

Have to go to electrical supply to buy it.
Been using it since the 80s and its absolutely the best.
Waterproof can take high or low temps and lasts for years.

It was 6 bucks a role last time I got one.
 
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