My Tractor Forum banner

21 - 35 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
How long will a Wal Mart battery last comparted to a Deere?

I have looked at Batteries Plus, but they seem to be way out of my ball park.
I would expect that you should get 3 years out of most batteries, at a minimum. A Walmart battery is good for the what you pay for them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,249 Posts
To keep the correct specs with a replacement I did not see much for options for agm batteries. I went ahead and picked up a yellow top today. Batteries plus gave my 10% off, still not cheap but not a high difference over an oem JD replacement. I am happy with it and it should last a bit longer the the original.

Thanks everyone for your input.
I notice the Optima battery you purchased is a Group 51R and the JD OEM battery is Group 51. The "R" means the battery terminals are reversed. It looks like the leads on your X590 were long enough to accommodate the reversed terminals. This is not the case in all tractors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
To keep the correct specs with a replacement I did not see much for options for agm batteries. I went ahead and picked up a yellow top today. Batteries plus gave my 10% off, still not cheap but not a high difference over an oem JD replacement. I am happy with it and it should last a bit longer the the original.

Thanks everyone for your input.
I notice the Optima battery you purchased is a Group 51R and the JD OEM battery is Group 51. The "R" means the battery terminals are reversed. It looks like the leads on your X590 were long enough to accommodate the reversed terminals. This is not the case in all tractors.
I did not catch that when I purchased the battery. I did notice I had to swap the leads when I installed it. I am glad the cable were long enough and didn't have to go back to swap batteries. This is the one I should have gotten. Thanks
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
I'm not recommending the Walmart batteries, but just giving my results. I have 2 riding mowers and just replaced batteries in both this year. The Walmart batteries I replaced both lasted a little over 6 years and I replaced them with the same, the approx. $23 Walmart batteries. I do occasionally put them on my Battery Tender to keep them fully charged.
 

·
Proud JD Owner
Joined
·
1,730 Posts
My batt went out, replaced it with a Deere OEM battery. ($pensive) Only got a year out of it and it leaked acid all over my machine causing quite a bit of damage that was not the easiest to clean up & fix. Put in an Interstate and have been happy ever since. It sits for months in the Winter with no tender on it and starts the machine in -10* temps. Works for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
I'm not recommending the Walmart batteries, but just giving my results. I have 2 riding mowers and just replaced batteries in both this year. The Walmart batteries I replaced both lasted a little over 6 years and I replaced them with the same, the approx. $23 Walmart batteries. I do occasionally put them on my Battery Tender to keep them fully charged.
I checked the Walmart site and believe the $23 one is 250 CCA whereas the Autozone I mentioned is 350 CCA at just under $50
https://www.autozone.com/miscellaneous-non-automotive/lawn-garden-battery/duralast-gold-u1-3-group-u1-lawn-garden-battery

I had one of the lower CCA batteries in my L17.542 initially, but have since replaced it with larger CCA batteries, second one since new in 2002. First one was a match to the one in my X738, best I remember it was an Interstate 340 CCA. I love how the AutoZone battery spins the engine each time, regardless how cold it has been. No battery tender on it yet, but expect to soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
The recommendation from anybody here (including me) will be anecdotal - their singular experience with their battery and not necessarily what you will find. For example, if someone has a battery that lasts 9 years, that does not mean yours, should you buy the same brand and model, will also last 9 years. There are, however some universal facts - AGM's are more durable, mountable in any position, sealed against leakage (well, they have a vent that opens under pressure to allow gas to escape w/o rupturing the case) lose their charge at a slightly lower rate than flooded batteries, are more expensive, etc. etc.

If you want real answers, do some research on your own. I suggest spending a few hours (yes, hours) reading articles on Battery University . Then decide if the differences between flooded and AGM are worth it to you. I know guys who buy the cheapest battery out there, and others who go for the more expensive options. Your bucks, your choice. Also, factor in how much of a hassle is it for you to get a replacement when your current battery dies? For what its worth, I put a new flooded in my Sears tractor when the OEM died. For me, the benefits of AGM did not outweigh the add'l cost and the battery place I deal with (and have for more than 35 years) had a reasonably priced batt in stock and ready to go.

As an aside, when my car batt died during a day trip in rural eastern Ohio, and I bought a replacement at the small town NAPA store I paid about 50% more than what this local purveyor of batteries would have charged me. Same warranty, might have even been the same brand at this battery only vendor.

Just for giggles, consider a lithium battery. They are much smaller, more expensive, require a special charger (sometimes), supposed to last longer, and weigh a lot less than lead acid. Unexpected benefits - your tractor will accelerate faster and will be lighter to pick up when it tips over....(oops, that last is mostly for motorcycles)(LOL).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
I did not catch that when I purchased the battery. I did notice I had to swap the leads when I installed it. I am glad the cable were long enough and didn't have to go back to swap batteries. This is the one I should have gotten. Thanks
Something no one has mentioned as in the case of the Optima battery is the construction type. The Optima battery shown is a spiral/rolled construction as opposed to the parallel plate type as shown by others, including me. The rolled construction is supposed to be much more rugged than the parallel plate type AGM. It is one of the reasons it is more often used in some more demanding/rugged applications like some military applications. In general, AGM batteries are used because they don’t have to be maintained like the flooded type. The glass mat in the AGM batteries also tends to keep the lead deposited to the plates from flaking off which may result in shorted plates. The more flooded batteries are charged, the more likely they become to this effect. AGM batteries also contain a material that mixes the hydrogen and oxygen created during charging to form water. Hence the removal of the need to maintain batteries by adding water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
The glass mat in the AGM batteries also tends to keep the lead deposited to the plates from flaking off which may result in shorted plates. The more flooded batteries are charged, the more likely they become to this effect.
I believe its discharging a battery (not charging) below 60% of its charge that makes flaking of the sponge lead more likely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
I believe its discharging a battery (not charging) below 60% of its charge that makes flaking of the sponge lead more likely.
Best I remember, partially correct. Had to go back and refresh the old brain. https://circuitdigest.com/tutorial/lead-acid-battery-working-construction-and-charging-discharging

During discharge more lead from the plate goes into the solution. During charging, the lead returns to the plates. The returning lead is not as pure and is soft, which may flake off if the battery is jarred, which results in two cells shorted together, lower voltage output, no longer usable. You are correct about discharging too much. What most people don’t understand is that all batteries discharge while not in use which leads to the need to use a battery tender, keeping the battery at full charge. Newer chargers are also controlled by small computer chips that can detect what type battery it is connected to, selects the charging characteristics, and charges accordingly. Old chargers would simply charge at a rate continuously which would result in overcharging, if left on too long, resulting in the lose of water, batteries going dry.

Lot more to batteries than most people realize. Just another tool we find very handy. Lead acid batteries are used because of the amount of energy that can be stored in them and how long they remain usable while not costing more than we can afford.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Just for background info, I've read in several places that you should charge a new battery before use - this means all lead acid batteries unless they are charged by the vendor immediately before you buy it (doesn't happen). If you don't you can lose 10% of the capacity of the battery. (So I've read someone correct me if they have other info).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,249 Posts
Just for background info, I've read in several places that you should charge a new battery before use - this means all lead acid batteries unless they are charged by the vendor immediately before you buy it (doesn't happen). If you don't you can lose 10% of the capacity of the battery. (So I've read someone correct me if they have other info).
What constitutes "use"? Typically you install a new battery in a vehicle or other machine and then the first time you start the engine the battery gets charged by the alternator. I always check the CCA of new batteries with an electronic tester and the results always exceed the rating of the battery. In other words, the battery tester has never reported a 10% loss.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,249 Posts
Would using, say, a 350 amp battery with a starter rated at 500 amps cause any damage to the starter?
No. Using a smaller capacity battery just means you may have reduced cranking time. If the engine always kicks off within a second or so you'll probably never notice but if it was ever hard to start the battery would run down quicker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
I have a old 318 Deer I use to haul stuff in yard summer time only. I put in some cheap $20.00 Durastart battery from
Runnings store three years ago. Tractor sits out side in snow for three years now. Battery was to be good only 6 months LOL. It still starts right up LOL. I laughed telling my wife that cheap junk battery still fires up.... Battery was so small in the 318 I had to slide in a 2x4 piece to hold it in place LOL.
 
21 - 35 of 35 Posts
Top