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Discussion Starter #41
We got the steering shafts made and the steering can now be called as ready.

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The space above the bevel box was so tight that the input joint could not be used as is. The bolt connection to the steering shaft had to be cut away and the shaft welded to the joint. Also the shaft between the bevel box and front axle was shortened a bit from the slide part to allow mounting without removing the bevel box.
 

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Should be fine as long as you keep them greased. Hopefully there are Zerks on the universal joints to facilitate that.
MikeC
 

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Discussion Starter #43
No, there are no grease nipples on the joints. They have sealed bearings. But the joints are not exposed to splash, dirt or snow. There will be a plate closing the big opening you see on the bottom of the frame and the bevel box is covered by the dashboard/center console integral mold part, which can be seen in the pictures in post #1.
 

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The steering joints get very little use (compared to a drive shaft for instance), I'm sure the new sealed joints will outlive us all.
 

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Discussion Starter #45 (Edited)
One more peculiarity of this tractor is that the oil pan is modified to avoid contact with the frame. However lifting the engine 1/2" would leave good gap. Quite amount of totally unnecessary work in manufacturing. If some designer would propose such solution to me at work I would simply call it bad design.

However the clash is so slight, that someone, who had ripped the original oil plug threads and welded a new nut there, had managed to mount the oil pan wrong way and still got the engine mounting bolts through the holes. Frame had rubbed small groove to the oil pan, but nothing to worry. With my friend we took the oil pan out, cleaned and inspected it, turned it right way and mounted back with a new seal.

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This is how the Mitsubishi L3E 3-cylinder engine looks underneath without an oil pan. I haven't seen before this kind of spring type coarse filter at the end of the oil pump suction pipe.
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That's the same engine I have in my Cub Cadet, i'll bet the spring is really meant to be a filter to keep big chunks from going through the oil pump.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Yes, that is the intention of a mesh in suction pipe. We sometimes call it "squirrel filter" 😁 Although that is more appropriate nickname for the mesh in fuel filler opening.

What kind of experiences do you have about the engine?
 

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Yes, that is the intention of a mesh in suction pipe. We sometimes call it "squirrel filter" 😁 Although that is more appropriate nickname for the mesh in fuel filler opening.

What kind of experiences do you have about the engine?
I have less then 500 hrs on it and hasn't caused me any problems. The biggest issue is when it's cold and after the glow plugs cycle it's still has to crank for a while for it to start, even when it's warmed up still doesn't fire right up. But maybe i'm just used to my Cummins engines firing up on the first crank cold or warm. I'm wondering if maybe the timing might need advanced, i've read where you just remove a shim from under the IP to advance it.
 

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Discussion Starter #49
It may have something to do with timing. Mine starts very well in cold even after very long periods of not being used. I've heard from the inventor of this Lokari Horse tractor that Mitsubishi engine is better on cold starts than Kubota engine, which was also available and sold more due to lower price.

I have a maintenance manual of this Mitsubishi L3E, which among other things has instructions for various adjustments of the injection pump. I can mail it to you if you are interested.
 

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I also had one of those engines; it was a generator / air conditioning unit in a camper I had. It always worked fine, but I found it rather loud. Not the exhaust, I had a good silencer on that; just mechanical noise, it sounded like a bucket of bolts from new.
 

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It may have something to do with timing. Mine starts very well in cold even after very long periods of not being used. I've heard from the inventor of this Lokari Horse tractor that Mitsubishi engine is better on cold starts than Kubota engine, which was also available and sold more due to lower price.

I have a maintenance manual of this Mitsubishi L3E, which among other things has instructions for various adjustments of the injection pump. I can mail it to you if you are interested.

I used to have a manual Bookmarked on my Computer but I just looked and it's gone, must have lost it when my Computer crashed last summer. I guess i'll have to see if I can find it again on the Web, if I can't i'll let you know.
 

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Discussion Starter #52
When I started to check the hydraulic hoses, I found out that 10 out of 12 hoses for hub motors needed to be replaced. Some were damaged, some were replaced with too stiff hoses and some had not-so-professional repair solutions. Fortunately our local Parker store has good service. I brought the old hoses to them, explained what needed to be different and got new ones after couple of hours.

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And here most of the news hoses preliminary routed. Only front leakage lines missing. As you can see, before making the service hole on the bottom plate it was absolutely impossible to change a hose when engine and pumps are in place. Even with the hole it is pretty awkward. Therefore it is very nice to have brand new hoses.

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When I started to check the hydraulic hoses, I found out that 10 out of 12 hoses for hub motors needed to be replaced. Some were damaged, some were replaced with too stiff hoses and some had not-so-professional repair solutions. Fortunately our local Parker store has good service. I brought the old hoses to them, explained what needed to be different and got new ones after couple of hours.

View attachment 2489168

And here most of the news hoses preliminary routed. Only front leakage lines missing. As you can see, before making the service hole on the bottom plate it was absolutely impossible to change a hose when engine and pumps are in place. Even with the hole it is pretty awkward. Therefore it is very nice to have brand new hoses.

View attachment 2489169
Going to be like a new machine when you are all done with it! (y)
 

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Looks like a lot of labeling would have to be done to keep things on track. Better you than me cause doubt I would have gotten everything back in the right place.
MikeC
 

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Discussion Starter #55 (Edited)
Indeed, I was very careful to make sufficient notes, sketches and labeling when disassembling to get everything right back when assembling. I have now the information to make almost complete hydraulic diagram of the system. Only thing which I don't know is the connection of the flow divider valves (acting as diff locks) integrated into the drive hydraulics block. I would like to know how they are connected, but I don't know how could I figure it out.

I also wish to make an electric diagram in later phase, but let's see if I can get clue of the connections.
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Rest of the hoses and pipes in front part are now there. Had to install the radiator mounting bracket because it creates a channel for the hoses.

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Engine is back there. It may very well be that we don't need to take it out anymore. But even if we have to, it's not a big deal, because there is an electric hoist available..

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Next thing will be mounting and connecting the control block for drive hydraulics and the valve block for accessory hydraulics. Some more pipes and hoses to follow 😆
 

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Looking good. Hope not much else to go on cause not sure where you would install it.:unsure:
MikeC
 

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When I made my hedgecutter, the biggest expense was the hydraulic lines; there's a lot of them, not more than your project has but a lot of long ones.
I took the whole thing with tractor to the shop and worked with the owner to make the lines.
 

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Discussion Starter #60
When I made my hedgecutter, the biggest expense was the hydraulic lines; there's a lot of them, not more than your project has but a lot of long ones.
I took the whole thing with tractor to the shop and worked with the owner to make the lines.
Hydraulic hoses do have their price. Most of the price comes from connectors and luckily the ones used in this tractor are very common stuff. It's also benefit that our local Parker store is supplier to my workplace and I get the same pricing. Average cost is about $35-40 per hose.
 
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