My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Deceased October 2017
Joined
·
21,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I know, its NOT a chainsaw, but close enough since we don't have a logsplitter forum.

I've got a OLD 30 ton (guess) factory built splitter, with the original 8 HP K-181 motor on it.

The hydraulic oil has been getting really hot when I run it more then an hour or so. When I bought it used 9 years ago, it had some type of red fluid in in. I assume it was auto trans fluid. I drained that out and have been using regular old hydraulic fluid in it since.

Do anyone know what should be used ? Since it seems to be running hotter then it ever had before, is that a sign of something wrong ? The hoses are getting hot for sure. Never noticed it before.

I assume but I'm not sure, the cooler the fluid the better ??

This splitter was made in the 60's or early 70's I was told by the guy I bought it from. His family bought it new. I've looked a few times for info on it. None to be found. Any decals or model info is long gone or painted over.

It was made by the "Big Giant" company in Parsippany NJ. Or at least that is what the previous owner told me.

Bottom line and question is : 10 weight hydraulic oil or an Auto Trans fluid ? Or another option ?
:thanku:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,035 Posts
It could be wear in the pump, which is heating the oil up.
Interestingly, I just read a thread on another forum, asking a similar question. The answer came from a Kubota technician, and sounded authoritative and sound.
The final answer was that you can use Dextron in a hydraulic system like a log splitter, and it will perform better than hydraulic fluid- it handles heat better, and is generally higher quality than hydraulic fluid. So, you could change what you have, and see how it does. A hydraulic system is going to develop heat- but, since you have noticed a difference lately, than it could be a pump wearing out, or a clogged filter (if it has a filter on the system), or a low fluid condition- less fluid will have to carry more heat. I'd go with the cheapest route first- change the filter if you think it needs it, and check/top off the fluid reservoir. If that doesn't help, than I'd assume that the pump is generating more heat than normal. You could then decide on replacing the pump, if the splitter is worth it, and when you do, switch to dextron.
 

·
Deceased October 2017
Joined
·
21,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for your replies :fing32:

I do have and will change the filter ASAP. It's been a few years at least. And many cords have been split.

The reservoir is full, I know the more fluid in the system, the cooler it stays, or at least that makes sence that it should.

Not sure about the pump, it's still putting out enough pressure to spilt just about anything I throw at it. What would be a sign of wear in a pump ? It's also the original pump I believe. And It's got many hours on it.

Again thanks for your replys, it sure gives me a starting point. :thanku:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
As was said, more than likely the pump wearing or it could be the pressure relief in the valve bypassing due to dirt or age. Even with a worn pump you may get the pressure but the flow will suffer. About the only way to tell is to put a flowmeter on the pump and see what it's putting out at the rated pressure.
As for a sign, does it seem any slower when coming up against a hard piece of wood, you probably wouldn't notice anything while it's not under a load.....Mike
 

·
The Magnificent
Joined
·
20,952 Posts
Ken, can you identify the pump manufacturer and model? With that info, we can probably figure out exactly what type of fluid to use.

I'm betting the red fluid would have been possibly type-A ATF if this thing is from the 1960s, or Type-F if 1970s.
 

·
Deceased October 2017
Joined
·
21,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Ken, can you identify the pump manufacturer and model? With that info, we can probably figure out exactly what type of fluid to use.

I'm betting the red fluid would have been possibly type-A ATF if this thing is from the 1960s, or Type-F if 1970s.
Nope, not a mark on it. I looked for a model # or some kind brand name. It's long gone.

I just put on a new valve a few weeks ago, same thing with the old one, no #s or anything. The new valve is twice the size of the old one and it's a Prince brand so its not a cheapie. I'm 99% sure the new valve has nothing to do with the heat issue.

If the new filter and fluid don't solve the problem, I'll take the pump off and try to identify it and rebuild, replace or upgrade it.

I haven't seen many of the new ones built as strong as this splitter, so I'll spend the needed $$ to keep it going till I'm gone.

The new valve that I put on is a 2 spool Prince so that I can add a log lift in the future. Hopefully soon, cause I've got some really BIG stuff to split. Some pieces are 48" and better. :Stop:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,945 Posts
If the new valve has power beyond or the hoses to the valve are connected incorrect the splitter will operate, but, the oil will heat.:crybaby:
 

·
Deceased October 2017
Joined
·
21,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
If the new valve has power beyond or the hoses to the valve are connected incorrect the splitter will operate, but, the oil will heat.:crybaby:
It does have the power beyond feature. I'm fairly sure that the hoses are correct. I did follow the schematic that came with the valve.

And great idea on the pump pic Scott, I'll get one in the am.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,945 Posts
If the valve has power beyond, 2 lines must return to the tank. A plug makes the oil go over the relief, causing heating.
 

·
Deceased October 2017
Joined
·
21,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
If the valve has power beyond, 2 lines must return to the tank. A plug makes the oil go over the relief, causing heating.
Ok, should I remove the power beyond plug and run a line from there back to the tank ? Would that be high pressure ?

I have to find the manual for the valve and take a look, I'm not doubting you at all, I just want to see if they show that, I very well could have missed it.

Scott, that for posting those pics. :fing32:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,945 Posts
Ok, should I remove the power beyond plug and run a line from there back to the tank ?

Yes .

Would that be high pressure ?

Yes it is.


I have to find the manual for the valve and take a look, I'm not doubting you at all, I just want to see if they show that, I very well could have missed it.

Scott, that for posting those pics. :fing32:
Hope this helps.
 

·
Retired Super Moderator - Deceased September 2015
Joined
·
26,679 Posts
I am pretty sure you want the power-beyond port to stay plugged since it would be high pressure, that normally goes to supply another valve, and not directly back to the Tank.IMO but I am not sure.
Usually if the pump is going it either doesn't pump or you loose pressure and it wouldn't be splitting very good. I would go back to the ATF since viscosity can make a difference also. :fing32:
Edit: Okay, I maybe wrong. When the PB port is blocked it is the same as using a closed-center position Valve. What I have read, if I understand right, that the PB port needs to return to the Tank.
http://www.baumhydraulics.com/files/infobuild/terms_hydraulic_control_valve.pdf
http://www.insidersecretstohydraulics.com/power-beyond.html
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,901 Posts
Did ya go from a open center to a closed center valve Ken?


BTW.. We need pictures of your big rounds (48") I wish we had stuff that size out here..
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top