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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Purchasing a JD 5095M. 95hp engine rating, 80hp PTO rating.

I am a rank newbie...(am I even in the right forum??)

Will use the tractor for food plot prep, plowing, disking etc.

Will also use for snow plowing, loader work, log skidding, trail maintenance.

Attachments; 3 bottom plow, 8' disk harrow, 8' bucket, front-end snow plow, root grapple & skidding winch.

Combination of field work and woods work. Place is in the mountains in north central VT, so some of the woods work will be on slopes.

Question.... how much rear weight? rear weights or loaded tires? Rim Guard or calcium?

Any informed suggestions are very much appreciated.
 

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Deere 330 Killer
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is youre gonna load the tires, rimguard is the way to go
 

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I would deffinitely load the tires. It will stop the rocking and rolling when you get most of the air space out of the tires. At least 150 lbs. of wheel weights wouldn't hurt on a tractor that size. I would load the front tires and get weights on the front.

If it wouldn't bother in the woods I would get the tires as wide as you can for working on the slopes.
 

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life is good
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Rim guard is the way to go.
Enjoy your new tractor and be carefull on those slopes.
 

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Just passing through
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Purchasing a JD 5095M. 95hp engine rating, 80hp PTO rating.

I am a rank newbie...(am I even in the right forum??)

Will use the tractor for food plot prep, plowing, disking etc.

Will also use for snow plowing, loader work, log skidding, trail maintenance.

Attachments; 3 bottom plow, 8' disk harrow, 8' bucket, front-end snow plow, root grapple & skidding winch.

Combination of field work and woods work. Place is in the mountains in north central VT, so some of the woods work will be on slopes.

Question.... how much rear weight? rear weights or loaded tires? Rim Guard or calcium?

Any informed suggestions are very much appreciated.
Do NOT load the front tires...it will limit your loader activities max loads...you can use suitcase weights for tillage activities...and can be removed when using the FEL...;)
Front Weight Retaining Pin
Required when Front Weights are used. Prevents Weights from sliding off of the Front Weight Support. Also requires L12491, Quick Pin, ordered separately.
T32146
Contact Dealer
Front Weight Support, 187 Lbs<<<Needed for hanging suitcases weights on...
R262449
Contact Dealer
Weight, Front Suitcase (104 Lb.) Quantity of One
Dealer must order 5000 Lbs. to receive free freight through Waterloo Weight Program. Available to Ag Dealers only.
R127764
$102.00
Weight, Front Suitcase, Twenty (20-R127764)
RFR127764
$1,881.00

I would get a rear wheel weights for this size tractor, because you can adjust your air pressure for tillage activities...;)
Weight, Rear Wheel 95 Lb.
Maximum of 2 per wheel.
NOTE:Compatibility concerns if installed on wheels sized 24" or smaller.
R213907
$149.00
 

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I'm with paul on weights.. I will NEVER load my tires again.. If need be i will hang weights on the inside of my rear rims to get proper ballast for the loader. BTW 8 foot disk harrow seems narrow for a 95 hp tractor. 7 foot would just cover my 75 hp JD6300... my 2210 (21hp) uses a 5 foot set from a ford tractor..
 

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Do NOT load the front tires...it will limit your loader activities max loads...you can use suitcase weights for tillage activities...and can be removed when using the FEL...;)
Paul, just curious, how does loading the front tires limit loader activities max loads?

Bob :rauch10:
 

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life is good
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For the most part we never change the air pressure in any of our tires.
On our loader tractor we have weights and rim guard, it counter balances the 2500lb lifting compacity.
 

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Paul, just curious, how does loading the front tires limit loader activities max loads?

Bob :rauch10:
If you put 200 lbs of rim guard in your front tires you have limited your front axles load capacity by 200 lbs...;)
 

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If you put 200 lbs of rim guard in your front tires you have limited your front axles load capacity by 200 lbs...
The axles don't bear the weight of the fluid in the tires. That's one of the advantages of loading the tires.
 

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Rim guard in rear, weights on rear wheels also. No rim guard in front tires, suitcase weights as someone noted before.

And as Paul C. pointed out, if you put weights on the front, attach them properly. Trust me, you get in a hard pull, and the weights fall off, STUFF HAPPENS! Or, traveling down the road and hit a frost heave, they will slide into the deepest part of the ditch.

Is this a 4-WD? If you're going to do a lot of woods work, a set of chains on the rears will help, especially if it's 2-WD. I've never see a flat spot in the woods of Vt. If you've never done it, go easy and be patient skidding wood. That winch is a smart way to go

Nice list of implements, I'm jealous. Also if you don't have 'em already:Woods cutting gear. Chaps, good boots, hard hat w/eye/ear protection etc.

Goods luck.
Got any pics?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for all of the helpful feedback.

I did go with Rimguard, rear wheels only.
Had already ordered the weight rack & weights for the front, along with
a brush guard & skid plates.

Yes it is a 4WD.
No, I don't have any pics. Will not be delivered 'til next week.
Yes, I do have & use chaps, safety glasses etc. when cutting wood.
Yes I ordered chains for all four wheels for plowing snow in winter.

Thanks again for the helpful recommendations & reminders.

Now I just need to get a bigger door on the shed!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Got all the stuff in last Thurs. Put 35 hours on the tractor from Thurs PM til Sun PM. Rimguard in the rear wheels appeared to work well from both a rear counterweight perspective as well as for traction in the woods & muddy places.

Thanks to all for the input.

One other thing, was plowing fields at the base of VT mountains that had not been previously plowed, as well as a new field created in the woods two years ago. Elevations were at about 1,500'. Lots & lots of rocks, some very big ones....had a gent following me on a Kubota with a grapple picking them up. Was using a Kverneland 3 bottom plow. It did a great job plowing the ground and was amazing in turning up large rocks and experiencing no damage. The trip set worked exceptionally well. Not an inexpensive plow, but great quality and handled the Vermont stones very well.
 

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If you put 200 lbs of rim guard in your front tires you have limited your front axles load capacity by 200 lbs...;)
Can you explain your answer with a little more detail , because I always thought that it did not affect the carrying capicity of the axle ?
 

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Rimguard in the rear wheels appeared to work well from both a rear counterweight perspective as well as for traction in the woods & muddy places.

Elevations were at about 1,500'. Lots & lots of rocks, some very big ones.....
I used to live in the Northeast Kingdom around Newport Center, on the Canadian border. Pretty rocky there, too. Now I'm in central New York. 1800 feet elevation, and if anything, more rocks then northern Vermont. Been plowing the same fields for 30 years, and they yield a fresh crop of rocks every Spring.

A few comments about some other comments. Loading your front tires with liquid makes the tractor handle pretty lousy if you ever want to drive it fast on the road. Front is apt to shake all over the place. Also, someone mentioned filling the rears so the liquid doesn't slosh around. That is the wrong thing to do. Liquid does not compress. If you fill your tires too full with liquid, and hit something on the ground hard, you can easily rupture the tire since it will have little give - unless you run them real soft. You need air in there as a cushion and tires never are supposed to be filled anywhere near 100% liquid. Rears only get parially filled and there are plenty of charts around to give the proper fill per tire-size.

Rim Guard is beet juice, last I checked. Good idea ,when it comes to not rusting out your rear rims. But . . . that stuff is absolutely disgusting once it's been in there for a few years. I just had to drain one of my tractor tires with beet juice that was 15 years old, and it was enough to make a maggot puke.
 

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That tractor should easily handle a 5-18 or 6-16 plow, and an 16 to 18 foot disk. Just figure an inch of plow per HP and you'll be pretty close. Your dealer should be able to advise you on the proper size of equipment.
steve
 
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