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In one house - 1400sf ranch, I have a little stove - VC Resolute Acclaim. Placed in almost center of house. Temperate climate of North AL/South TN. Lately, has been 21*F at night with highs at 40*F daytime. Little stove keeps it real toasty by feeding it every 4-5h - 80* near stove and 70* in farthermost BR.
A little stove will work if 1. you place near center of house and 2. you can feed every 4-5 hours. Overnight, I may get 6-7 hr of usable heat.
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I don't see a damper on your exhaust pipe? I was asking the OP if he could post a pic because I've noticed that as outside temps dropped below 30, my old stove without damper would start pulling too much draft and all the heat went up the chimney. It didn't matter how much wood I piled in.

As soon as I added a damper, I could control the draft while running the stove wide open.
 

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I got rid of the wood stove about 5-6 years ago, can't say I miss it that much, my back was getting too bad to keep carrying/stacking wood. I'd work the weekend and then be almost immobile for work the next 2 - 3 days. Furnace is keeping up with the teens today though so I'm comfortable, but will enjoy having warmer temps by Sunday.
It was just the opposite for me. I was working a high-stress IT job and the firewood processing was physically therapeutic. The warmth and dancing flames was also mentally therapeutic.

That was then. Now I drive truck three days a week. Wife had me plow out a path to my wood pile this year but she still doesn't let me burn wood. Not sure why the path???
 

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Having a chimney that runs straight up the interior can create too much draft that can make it hard to control. While better to do in the planning phase, going with a larger diameter flue, can slow the rise and subsequently the draft as some of the heat passes through the chimney wall into the room.

Some EPA stoves want the air controlled at the intake rather than a damper in the flue but there are limits to how much the intake can be controlled. On my former home, my zero clearance fireplace had a notched out damper that limited how much the air intake could be reduced. It also had a second air inlet that was fixed in size. When I installed it, I made the mistake of choosing the smaller diameter chimney and it had too much draft. There was no option for a flue damper.

The dealer offered an intake damper with a smaller notch but I would have had to pull out the unit to swap it so I declined. Instead, I would partially plug the fixed primary air intake for overnight burns to prevent runaway, but that intake was also what would help to burn down the coals so with less air, the stove would be full of hot coals which had to be burned down so more wood could be added.
 

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I don't see a damper on your exhaust pipe? I was asking the OP if he could post a pic because I've noticed that as outside temps dropped below 30, my old stove without damper would start pulling too much draft and all the heat went up the chimney. It didn't matter how much wood I piled in.
As soon as I added a damper, I could control the draft while running the stove wide open.
No damper. 6 ft of black pipe, then 9 ft of Class A chimney, straight up. As LLigetfa indicated, I control air with intake. I can shut it down to a really low burn - I do that overnight and still have lotsa red coals for an easy restart 18hr later. Cold start gets full air, then down to 1/2 air for 4-5 hr burn with stovetop at 500-600*.

If you have an old smoke dragon and a tall, straight chimney - yeah, you may need a damper.
 
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