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One guy did say "I can't make any money doing that because I didn't sell you a furnace"... He promptly got scratched off my list of reputable heating guys.


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I called a plumber once to ask him to hook up a bathroom for me ...he told me that because I already bought everything he couldn't make any money on the job so he wouldn't do it. And yet he was known to complain about having no work.
 

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I knew a fellow who had a theory that parking hay wagons on the windward side of his house, real close like, it would cut down his heating bill. The hay wagons were empty. He couldn't understand why I would suggest he pile some junk hay he had laying around on them to block more wind, and it would work better. HE called ME crazy. Far be it for me to help my fellow man.
 

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In my sometimes impoverished youth I lived in various houses that had no insulation and so we would bank up the house with snow. Even then the radiant heat loss through the wall would melt a 6 inch space between the wall and the snowbank so we'd have to keep filling it back in. We should have used hay but we never owned a baler so the hay was loose and it never dawned on me to cobble up some means to hold it in place. We did pile hay over the well and hung a 100W lightbulb in it to keep it from freezing.
 

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I have forced hot water heat and an oil fired furnace,which also heats the water,so the furnace has been on more than off the past 2 weeks,and the oil tank is now under half full,after filling it on Nov.11th..:(...thing runs at least 30 minutes per hour, if its windy,when temps are this low..the house is pretty well insulated too,but the windows aren't exactly draft free...
I have relatively new windows but even so I found that covering them up with something (a combination of bubble-wrap stuck to the glass, window shades, a bed sheet hanging down over the sliding door and ad-hoc storm windows made from plastic wrap & lumber scraps) made a noticeable difference in both heating costs & comfort. If the windows are drafty then I would expect even more improvement.

The result wasn't pretty (especially the bed sheet over the sliding door and the angled 1x2's holding it up :)) but I figured it was worth it.

If you have trees and a heated garage I'm almost thinking some kind of "cutting & splitting party" would make sense, renting a log splitter for a day and making a batch of chili or something. Even if the wood was still green a month or two in a lightly heated garage with some air circulation would help. I would offer to be the first party-goer if I lived closer.
 

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I’m getting two propane wall stoves and a 300 gallon tank soon to heat my garage. The house is natural gas and set at 68 it’s nice and toasty


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Propane is insanely expensive here. Lots of folks are converting back to oil. I would find a way to trench a gas line in since you already have gas on the property.
 

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Propane is insanely expensive here. Lots of folks are converting back to oil. I would find a way to trench a gas line in since you already have gas on the property.


Nothing is set in stone yet, all my options are there. I have a wood stove but I need to plumb in a stack/chimney. The gas company moved my meter to the side of my house from the side of my neighbors old shack(long story) luckily the old pipe goes next to the garage I might be able to tap into it and the new meter. Or option 3 propane tank


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I have relatively new windows but even so I found that covering them up with something (a combination of bubble-wrap stuck to the glass, window shades, a bed sheet hanging down over the sliding door and ad-hoc storm windows made from plastic wrap & lumber scraps) made a noticeable difference in both heating costs & comfort. If the windows are drafty then I would expect even more improvement.

The result wasn't pretty (especially the bed sheet over the sliding door and the angled 1x2's holding it up :)) but I figured it was worth it.

If you have trees and a heated garage I'm almost thinking some kind of "cutting & splitting party" would make sense, renting a log splitter for a day and making a batch of chili or something. Even if the wood was still green a month or two in a lightly heated garage with some air circulation would help. I would offer to be the first party-goer if I lived closer.

Much of the problem with my firewood situation is most of my old buddies have passed away,that would come help me out..and the few younger friends I have left are beat after a long day's work,have families and kids,so they have little precious spare time and do not feel like playing lumberjack on their only days off...

I used to be able to take care of it myself,but the past few years have taken my back out big time..its a tough job getting enough wood cut up for a whole winter,even if your in excellent condition.....so is practically anything else I used to think nothing of doing..everything is much harder now and I end up suffering after trying to do what I once could without any problem..

One reason I went with barrel stoves in my garage is because you don't have to cut the logs into short lengths,and many pallets will slide right in after a few slices,it beats having to hammer them apart or cut them into pieces--but the stoves in the house can only fit 16" logs..

I have a huge bay window on the south side of the house facing the street--it is great for getting solar heat when the sun is out--but a curse after sunset,there is only mini-blinds on it and those do not hold in any heat and the size of the window makes it feel like a huge "cold spot" is there at night..

I have been thinking of making a "curtain rod" out of pipe or conduit and use flanges screwed to the wall to make a heavy duty curtain hanger--those cheesy stamped tin ones suck,they fold in half under the weight of a large curtain,and if I did that,I could hang a thick quilt as a curtain and keep the heat loss to a minimum..the windows are double paned glass,but still seem to let the cold come thru...

I hung a quilt over my bedroom window and it made a big difference ...there is also a huge window A/C unit in the kitchen that only has a trash bag taped over it--I did my best to seal up around it and the window frame,but it still lets cold air sneak in when its windy out..that may get a quilt stapled over it today..

There is 6-8" of snow predicted for Thursday in my area..just what I need being doubled over with a backache and have to get my diesel truck started somehow,the plow put on it,and a drive belt on my plow tractor,in less than 2 days..after that,more arctic cold,even worse than its been the past 10 days,for this weekend...:(
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Mid teens outside, mid sixties inside. Furnace hasn't been on all night, but the little sucka' ate a bunch of cherry wood.
 

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I got rid of the wood stove about 5-6 years ago, can't say I miss it that much, my back was getting too bad to keep carrying/stacking wood. I'd work the weekend and then be almost immobile for work the next 2 - 3 days. Furnace is keeping up with the teens today though so I'm comfortable, but will enjoy having warmer temps by Sunday.
 

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I'm in casual winter country. A few days here and there of real cold, maybe a week or two at a time at the most. Most of this winter has been in the 50s on average for example. I have to get rid of the wood from normal lot upkeep anyways, so I might as well burn it inside. I've only had to burn maybe 20 or 30 days at the most since November and then only part of most days. If I had to do it all day every day for months, I probably wouldn't.
 

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I got rid of the wood stove about 5-6 years ago, can't say I miss it that much, my back was getting too bad to keep carrying/stacking wood. I'd work the weekend and then be almost immobile for work the next 2 - 3 days. Furnace is keeping up with the teens today though so I'm comfortable, but will enjoy having warmer temps by Sunday.
It was -7* when I got up this morning so I built a fire. Had one yesterday afternoon when the temps started dropping. Only had one other fire this season. I heated with wood for 44 years. I always enjoyed processing firewood for the winter. Last winter I came to the realization that I just can't do it anymore. The past 4 years I bought most of my firewood already split and seasoned. I was paying $125.00 a cord for oak. That was cheap enough and I still enjoy the fires but even going and loading my trailer and bringing it home to stack was getting too much. I turned 70 last August and like you, I paid dearly for 2 or 3 days after that kind of activity.
I have a little maple I got from my daughter's house last summer. She still has some there from a tree they cut down and I will probably get it this summer with the help of my grandson but I'm done with heating all winter eith wood. My house is well insulated and my furnace keeps up just fine.
 

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I've been cutting and burning wood for over 35 years and have always been lucky and have and had different woods to cut in. I'm hoping to get a few more years out of my body cutting wood but I notice every year it gets harder to do. I enjoy being outside doing it most of the time as long as i'm not being in a rush because of the weather.
 

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I'm in casual winter country. A few days here and there of real cold, maybe a week or two at a time at the most. Most of this winter has been in the 50s on average for example. I have to get rid of the wood from normal lot upkeep anyways, so I might as well burn it inside. I've only had to burn maybe 20 or 30 days at the most since November and then only part of most days. If I had to do it all day every day for months, I probably wouldn't.
Can you show us a pic of your wood stove and exhaust pipe? Are you using a damper?
 

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In one house - 1400sf ranch, I have a little stove - VC Resolute Acclaim. Placed in almost center of house. Temperate climate of North AL/South TN. Lately, has been 21*F at night with highs at 40*F daytime. Little stove keeps it real toasty by feeding it every 4-5h - 80* near stove and 70* in farthermost BR.
A little stove will work if 1. you place near center of house and 2. you can feed every 4-5 hours. Overnight, I may get 6-7 hr of usable heat.
VC1.jpg
 

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I've been using my stoves at night mostly ,when it was cold enough out,this "winter" so far has been pretty mild & tame though,no snow at all here now,bare ground,and temps have been mostly between 35-50 degrees daily,with rain instead of snow..
It was about 5 degrees this morning when I woke up,it is expected to reach 32* by noon,but remain rather windy and despite the bright sun ,it still feels frigid outside as a result..

I have been burning mostly pallets in my upstairs stove,as they seem to throw much more heat than logs,due to its rather poor draft--I put a desk fan in front of the stove to force a draft,to prevent smoke from back drafting into the house when it is windy--on calm days using the fan on low speed is still a must as the draft can take a long time to get any better ,it takes that huge outdoor chimney awhile to warm up..

I did get a new stainless steel custom made chimney cap installed by the roofer,who rebuilt the two top courses of bricks and made a new cement cap on it,that has helped a lot to prevent back drafts,but it'll still do that if its windy enough,especially if its from the north east or east..

I have quite a bit of cut up logs left,however since I have not used a lot of wood the past few years,much of it is now light as balsa wood and moldy or punky,and burns very fast--I'm trying to get rid of as much of that first as possible so the rest of the less seasoned logs wont get moldy or rotten too..

I could probably get enough pallets for free to supply all my firewood needs,and after all the trees I have piled up out back are used up,that is the way I'll probably go--I'm not up to hefting a chain saw and lifting trees onto a sawbuck any more,or splitting wood with a maul,--just lugging it into the house makes me feel like I'm going to have a stroke half the time now..
 
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