My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 20 of 44 Posts

·
Blank Space
Joined
·
2,994 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
... when it's 20 degrees or less for a couple of days. Does OK keeping the chill off, but it sucks a lot of wood to maintain 60 inside. Does real good when the temps are 30 or more.

It's been chugging along since Saturday and the gas furnace has only kicked on a dozen or so times, so it's definitely helping.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,183 Posts
We have had about 3 straight days of zero or below at night and single digits during the day. My stove uses a little more wood for sure but it's keeping up. My furnace issue set at 68 at night and 74 during the day and it has not kicked on. If we get too many more days like this without a break I'll have to turn it up a bit to get the chill out of the other end of the house. Suppose to moderate a little starting tomorrow so I should be good.
 

·
Senior Moment
Joined
·
3,215 Posts
My wood furnace has been keeping up... I sure am going through the firewood though. Sunny days help, even when it's in the single digits. Passive solar works that way.


Unlike most, I don't have gas or oil as a backup or main heat source. It's wood or nothin'.


.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
16,835 Posts
My oil burner hasn't been on since we lit up the wood fire boiler Nov 8th. Heats the whole house, my shop and provides all the hot water. Last week just finished the first cord of wood that I stack by basement door. Got five more in the shed about 35 ft away. But this high wind really kicks up the use. Probably heat loss from shop out in garage. Not as well insulated as the house. Since this arctic chill has been around have left thermostat out there at 60 rather than normal 48. Love going out there when it's warm instead of waiting for it to heat up. But above freezing weather suppose to return next week. Then only Feb and March to get through. Guess I should have three or so cords left for next year. Good, less cutting and splitting for me.
MikeC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
i installed a us stoves hot blast furnace this year to replace the old wood stove,old one when it was 30 you were ok anything less you got cold real quick,i bought the hot blast at an auction for $130 and after buying all the duct work and running it in the house $300 more,it will heat you out of the house on its lowest setting when its 30(need windows open)and its 75 or so when its been 0 or less so far this year:thThumbsUI basically have mine seperate from the house,I built a 10 by10 building,insulated it to death then put roofing tin on the inside,tried to make it as fire proof as possible,making a "hot box",this building shares 1 wall with the house,we had an outside entrance to our 1/3 basement and that is the only way into the basement,we are filling in the basement next spring and will have a 3 foot crawl space matching the rest of the house(cant do anything with the basement it always is wet)so i ran my new duct work in under the house thru the old entrance to the basement ,we have already filled the outside steps to the basement so we have a 30 in door way to the (new) crawl space,,now each room has its own floor register so the whole house is the same temp,and all the floors are warm,after the heat the best part of the whole thing is no more smoke in the house and no carrying in wood and carrying out ashes thru the house and no ash dust all over the place
 

·
15,000 +posts!
Joined
·
19,712 Posts
It seems every day it gets real cold here,like today,in the 20's ,or a Nor'easter storm comes in,we get winds gusting up to 40+ mph,and they usually come from the perfect direction that makes my wood stove upstairs back draft smoke into the house,sparks sometimes blow out too...so I can't make much use of it right when its needed most..:(--and I dont trust the stove unless I'm right there to keep an eye on it..

The stove is one of those "hearth-mate" units that sits on the hearth,and has a steel plate that covers the fireplace opening...it vents directly into the chimney ,and it being designed for a fireplace,the flue is huge,like 12x18"...it is an "outside" chimney also,and very large,and cold chimneys are noted for poor draft..

A local wood stove dealer calls it a "slammer"--they were made to get quickly installed with a minimum of labor or expense back in the days of the energy crisis.."slam it in and light it up"..
He said they work much better when vented with the flex pipe..

I've read and been told to "properly" install this type of unit,your supposed to use a stainless steel flue flex pipe 6" in diameter from it ,right up to the top of the chimney,and have a metal "cap" that reduces the chimney opening to the 6" hole for the flex pipe,so it'll get proper draft...some say you should insulate the pipe from the chimney with rock wool also...the pipe costs about 300 bucks..stove pipe could be used ,but probably would rot away in 1 or 2 seasons..

That seems rather expensive and seeing I only use the stove "some" to supplement the furnace,and it works "ok" most days,I am not really fond of having to spend that much and have it installed..it was intended to be only an emergency back up heat source should the power go off,but I love wood heat and have been using it more the past 3 years than since it was installed..(My late mother could not deal with the stove,having COPD,so we rarely used it at all before she passed )..

The small cast iron box wood stove I have in the basement next to the oil furnace is vented into the flue just below the oil furnace,and it hasn't back drafted or showed any sign of the flue not being of sufficient size to handle the "exhaust"...

"Shared" flues are now pretty much against code,but this was done when the house was built in the late 70's and the local fire chief said "we kind of frown upon this type of installation,each appliance should have its own flue--but they did it right,by putting the oil furnace vent pipe above the wood stove's,so if the stove soots up the vent it won't block the furnace gases from going up the flue".."You shouldn't have any trouble--also the fact the furnace keeps the flue warm lessens creosote & soot build up somewhat"...

If not for insurance hassles,I'd like to put a barrel stove in the basement instead of the cheap cast iron stove,that has wide gaps everywhere and is nowhere near air-tight...I am building one out of an old air compressor tank (60 gallon),to replace the barrel stove out in the garage ,that has a barrel many years old that is starting to get porus...
I feel the barrel stove is safer than the cast iron stove,but anything "home made" in a home is frowned upon by insurers,they aren't fond of "UL listed" factory built stoves either really,and surcharge you almost double if you insist on having one lately..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,816 Posts
My old Lopi will run you out of the house, but she is like a diesel in the cold, it takes some work to get it going but when it is, look out. It was so hot last week the sented oil thing was boiling.

I use a fan to move the heat around the house, seems to do well.

Good luck, stay warm!
 

·
Senior Moment
Joined
·
3,215 Posts
So far, through this cold spell these last two weeks, I've had glowing coals in the furnace every morning... Pop in some smaller pieces, kick on the draft inducer blower and heat within the time It takes to make my coffee.

The furnace is a Clayton Wood/Coal unit made by U.S. Stove. I am venting it through the 3 flue masonry chimney and it's flue is solid stainless lined, not flex pipe. I'm very happy with the unit but as of now the installation is not complete. I still don't have duct work installed. It's just dumping it's heat into the utility room and I'm blowing that heat into the house. (It's a long ranch style home, for the most part there's no basement, "utility room" is on the main level) With duct work the heat would be more evenly distributed and I would be able to use less wood.

I've found it impossible to get any of the local heating companies to bend any sheet metal and do a duct install for me... I don't know what's up with that. There's no code violations with what I have planned, they just won't follow through. One guy did say "I can't make any money doing that because I didn't sell you a furnace"... He promptly got scratched off my list of reputable heating guys.

It's more that just ductwork too... One section of the house will still be heated with hot water radiators that are already in place, so there's pumps, piping, thermostats, relays, etc. etc. I can't see how a company could not "make money" completing this system... Charge what you want, if it's acceptable I'll write a check.

Again, it ends up falling to me to complete it. :dunno:


.
 

·
15,000 +posts!
Joined
·
19,712 Posts
Liability scares them I guess...insurance companies dictate what can and "shouldn't" be done,and few contractors will risk their necks to do a "custom" installation now..

Having to use a "liner" seems a waste to me in ways,on an "insert" stove like mine..
I think of all the heat wasted thats coming off that flex pipe or stove pipe thats in a "sealed" chimney !..
It would go a long ways to keep the house warmer ..instead of heating the bricks in an outdoor chimney..

In my garage I've found if you dont have a length of stove pipe at least 6 feet long connecting the stove to the flue,your losing a LOT of the heat--the pipe throws off almost as much as the stove will...
When I moved my stove several feet away from the flue connection and added about 10 feet of pipe,it made a very noticeable difference in the comfort level inside..before I had it connected directly to the flue with just an elbow and maybe a foot of pipe,and it did a great job of keeping the chimney warm,but not me!..
 

·
Blank Space
Joined
·
2,994 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I've got not much more than 6' of pipe in the living space. Only about 2' through the roof. Some cement based backer boards meant for tile floors and a couple of pieces of left over duct/sheetmetal collects, deflects and reflects radiant heat up into the fan stream to push it into the house.

4-6" of white menace predicted for tonight, so I had to haul a couple of loads in today.
 

·
Professional Homeowner
Joined
·
7,068 Posts
My add on is designed for 2500 square feet. Our house is 3600 square feet, and the garage the furnace is in is about 400 square feet. It still keeps the house above 72 in most weather over 10 degrees F, and over 70 at 0 degrees F, but I need to have the right wood to do so, and it goes through a lot of it. Ash will keep the fire going for 9+ hours, keeping the house at 72, even at 5-10 degrees F. If it's Much colder it requires cranking it up a little more, and not getting a full 8-10 hour burn on a load.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
My add on is designed for 2500 square feet. Our house is 3600 square feet, and the garage the furnace is in is about 400 square feet. It still keeps the house above 72 in most weather over 10 degrees F, and over 70 at 0 degrees F, but I need to have the right wood to do so, and it goes through a lot of it. Ash will keep the fire going for 9+ hours, keeping the house at 72, even at 5-10 degrees F. If it's Much colder it requires cranking it up a little more, and not getting a full 8-10 hour burn on a load.
thats the only part that sucks about mine,if its real cold 0 or below ,the burn time is 2 hours,house is 70 to 74,temp is great but you eat a tree every 24 hours,I think that will change when i build a new masonry chimney this summer,I built a chimney like most people here use1/4 in thick x 8 in steel pipe,25 feet tall,my house is a big ole victorian(2500 sq ft)2 story and it does need more insulation its not to badly insulated)It i think takes a lot of heat to keep that pipe hot,when its warmer then burn times approach 6 hours at best;so i dont get alot of sleep in the winter:Disgus:
 

·
Blank Space
Joined
·
2,994 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
It's funny how much goes in and how little comes out. I can keep it running for three days, shoving log after log into it (quite a few armloads full). Then I have to let it cool and shovel it out. I usually get a good full standard metal bucket (3 gallon?).
 

·
Senior Moment
Joined
·
3,215 Posts
My furnace has a shaker grate at the bottom... No need to stop burning and no shoveling. Just shake it down and empty the pan into the metal ash bucket.
 

·
Blank Space
Joined
·
2,994 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
A mere 3 degrees outside with a stiff north wind and really not much trouble keeping the house around 70. Does take a lot of wood though and I'll need to find more for next year. I was hoping to mostly finish off the pile I had this winter (some of it was getting old with so little need to burn the last two winters) and it looks like that will happen.
 

·
15,000 +posts!
Joined
·
19,712 Posts
I'm not in good shape as far as the amount of firewood I have ready to burn--haven't been able to get outside and cut up the two dozen or more big trees I dragged out of my back yard woods last summer,due to back pain,and other circumstances..and with wind chills at -15 today,I'm not about to attempt to cut any now either..(It'll split easy now though!)..

I have used up much of what I had accumulated already,and there's 3 more long cold months ahead..
I have avoided going in my garage much because the two barrel stoves in there will eat a tree in one day easily,and your still lucky to get it above 30 degrees on days like today,especially if it is windy..(10-20 mph today)..the stoves in the house are not as "hungry",but I can use up a dozen or more logs daily quite easily..

Weather here has been absolutely frigid,with temps dropping below zero at night and going no higher than 20 for the past 2 weeks,and the next 7-10 days is not looking any better either--and a possible "big snowstorm" for Thursday may hit here as well..

I have forced hot water heat and an oil fired furnace,which also heats the water,so the furnace has been on more than off the past 2 weeks,and the oil tank is now under half full,after filling it on Nov.11th..:(...thing runs at least 30 minutes per hour, if its windy,when temps are this low..the house is pretty well insulated too,but the windows aren't exactly draft free..

I only have enough fuel assistance left to maybe get the oil tank filled once more,if the prices dont go higher--they went from 2.29 a gallon on Dec.15th to 2.69 as of the 29th,and have been going up daily..
I also get charged 50 cents more per gallon being on fuel assistance,so that cuts down how much you can get..diesel fuel has gone up to 2.85 a gallon from 2.20 at the beginning of December..

I doubt very much the oil prices will level off or fall anytime soon..
I'm very apprehensive about having enough oil to get thru the winter,not having enough wood to help supplement the furnace..:(
I may have to buy 100 gallons out of pocket,the minimum amount they'll deliver without a "penalty"of $50 ,I had planned to use that money towards getting the roof and chimney repaired,but if this arctic cold keeps up,that will not be possible..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,118 Posts
If it were not for the low cost of natural gas I would still be burning wood. I still have a two year supply of very well seasoned Black Ash firewood laid up but the wife won't let me burn it. I had no problem to keep the house toasty warm in -40 with just the wood heat when we've had extended power failures. I felt sorry for my neighbors out there in -40 trying to get or keep their generators going so that they could run their furnace. I have a generator on hand JIC but so far have not had to drag it out in the cold as the power came back on in time before I needed the well water and had to put freezer packs outside to freeze and then put them in the fridge keep its contents from spoiling.

Mostly have the generator to run my sump pump(s) if I have to.
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
Top