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JUST BOUGHT NEW TIRES FOR OUR FORD 3000,13.6-28 SIZE,THE LIQUID THAT WAS USED BEFORE WAS CALCIUM,NOW IAM TOLD THAT RV ANTIFREEZ OR WINSHIELD SOLVENT CAN BE USED? I DIDNT WANT TO PUT THE CALCIUM BACK IN, THEN THE TIRE SHOP SAYS POWDER?AND IS 90 PERCENT FILLED NESSASARY? I LIVE IN CENTRAL OHIO AND LIQUID FREEZING IS A ISSUE,SO I FIGURE SOME TYPE OF ANTIFREEZ FOR WEIGHT SAY DOWN TO -20 BELOW SHOULD BE FINE, ANY THOUGHTS OR ADVISE?:thanku:
 

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Use RimGuard. It's heavier than WWF, made from beet juice, and not corrosive. I've heard of powder too. Some say it is just dry cement powder, the stuff used to make concrete. Not sure how they get the powder in the tire and how they get it out if the tire needs servicing.
 

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Beet Juice/pulp also known as Rim Guard (brand name) is an option. http://www.rimguard.biz/

Windshield washer fluid is fairly cheap but consider what would happen if you get a leak - i.e. toxicity to crops/ground/animals.

You could use R.V. antifreeze as it's reasonably non-toxic. But if you have a full sized tractor could be expensive unless you can find it on sale at end of winter season.

You could try contacting this company and see if they'd sell to you directly (glycerin based ballast): http://www.bio-tire.com/index.html
 

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JUST BOUGHT NEW TIRES FOR OUR FORD 3000,13.6-28 SIZE,THE LIQUID THAT WAS USED BEFORE WAS CALCIUM,NOW IAM TOLD THAT RV
THE TIRE SHOP SAYS POWDER?AND IS 90 PERCENT FILLED NESSASARY? I LIVE IN CENTRAL OHIO AND LIQUID FREEZING IS A ISSUE,SO I FIGURE SOME TYPE OF ANTIFREEZ FOR WEIGHT SAY DOWN TO -20 BELOW
90% is not necessary and not even recommended unless you've got tubeless tires. You need enough liquid so the tires don't slosh, but you need enough air so the tires don't burst if you hit something. Air can take shock, liquid cannot.

13.6 X 28" tires if tube type, take 38.4 U.S. gallons (or 32 Imperial gallons) of water and 77 pounds of calcium. That gives you protection to minus 23 degrees F.

If you going to use something else, e.g. beet juice, you add around 400 lbs. to each tire.

Generally speaking, tube-tires get filled to a max of 75%, and tubeless to a max of 90%.
 
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