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I may just go the route of buying one from JB. 4" stroke. $260 for it but at least I know what I'm getting. Still open for suggestions though. I like the idea of $40 and the ability for downforce even if it has more than needed. I was reading another post from a while ago where a guy used a tilt/trim unit from an outboard. Sounded intriguing to say the least. Being on the lake here, I can come up a complete unit fairly cheap, they are hydraulic but run off 12V. Downside is they are pretty darn heavy and bulky.
I did exactly that. Used it for years. Moved up and down kinda slow, and with a real heavy implement struggled to bring it up, but a couple bumps and it would be clear.
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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Well, I decided to go with a smaller winch instead. I know I'm giving up downforce but can add weights where needed. The travel looks to only use about 12" of cable to give me all the lift I need and not at a snails pace. Here's a sneak peek of the mount, all I've got left is the wiring and switch mount. No modifications were needed to the JD sleeve hitch so, if needed I can go back to manual, not that I even plan to.
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Fantastic, that looks great! Awesome work! It looks very solid. Some of those pieces are THICK.

That bottom tab (near the implement) where the cable attaches, what's the white piece? If that could be eliminated, bringing the eyebolt closer to the tab, you'd reduce the bending load on that tab, when it's heavily loaded. Granted, that piece is big, and it may not care. But it made me curious why the white block is there. Or maybe, if it was a concern, you could make the eyebolt parallel and inline with that black tab, rather than perpendicular. You'd pretty much eliminate that bending.

I got mine more finished over the weekend. My 2" receiver is bolted to my bottom hitch plate. And with the winch tower attached there, I was worried about bending that plate (the winch tower forms a long lever arm, by comparison). So I made some some plates to tie the winch tower back to the big rod that becomes the manual sleeve hitch lever. That way much of the load is being carried by the piece that took that load originally. The U-bolts carry the load, as the tower gets pulled back, away from the tractor.

It doesn't look as nice as yours, but so far, it seems functional, in some quick testing yesterday with my ripper.

Like you said, I really like the speed of the winch, and the "infinite" travel. I can raise the implement much higher than before, and can lower the hitch all the way to the ground. I have about 19" of stroke, up from more like 3" with the manual setup. And the speed means that it doesn't matter at all if the implement needs to go up & down a lot, vs my SLOW cheap actuator :)

I had a similar goal. My winch can be installled/removed without tools. And the manual sleeve hitch functionality remains, I just remove the winch tower, and reinstall the lift bar. The winch was originally designed for the front of the tractor, for my bucket mount. So sometimes it will be used up front, instead, and the sleeve hitch will go back to being manual.
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Fantastic, that looks great! Awesome work! It looks very solid. Some of those pieces are THICK.

That bottom tab (near the implement) where the cable attaches, what's the white piece? If that could be eliminated, bringing the eyebolt closer to the tab, you'd reduce the bending load on that tab, when it's heavily loaded. Granted, that piece is big, and it may not care. But it made me curious why the white block is there. Or maybe, if it was a concern, you could make the eyebolt parallel and inline with that black tab, rather than perpendicular. You'd pretty much eliminate that bending.

I got mine more finished over the weekend. My 2" receiver is bolted to my bottom hitch plate. And with the winch tower attached there, I was worried about bending that plate (the winch tower forms a long lever arm, by comparison). So I made some some plates to tie the winch tower back to the big rod that becomes the manual sleeve hitch lever. That way much of the load is being carried by the piece that took that load originally. The U-bolts carry the load, as the tower gets pulled back, away from the tractor.

It doesn't look as nice as yours, but so far, it seems functional, in some quick testing yesterday with my ripper.

Like you said, I really like the speed of the winch, and the "infinite" travel. I can raise the implement much higher than before, and can lower the hitch all the way to the ground. I have about 19" of stroke, up from more like 3" with the manual setup. And the speed means that it doesn't matter at all if the implement needs to go up & down a lot, vs my SLOW cheap actuator :)

I had a similar goal. My winch can be installled/removed without tools. And the manual sleeve hitch functionality remains, I just remove the winch tower, and reinstall the lift bar. The winch was originally designed for the front of the tractor, for my bucket mount. So sometimes it will be used up front, instead, and the sleeve hitch will go back to being manual.
That white block is actually a 1/2" chunk of flat steel used as a spacer fit tight to the eyebolt. No different than the tab being 3/4 of an inch thick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Fantastic, that looks great! Awesome work! It looks very solid. Some of those pieces are THICK.

That bottom tab (near the implement) where the cable attaches, what's the white piece? If that could be eliminated, bringing the eyebolt closer to the tab, you'd reduce the bending load on that tab, when it's heavily loaded. Granted, that piece is big, and it may not care. But it made me curious why the white block is there. Or maybe, if it was a concern, you could make the eyebolt parallel and inline with that black tab, rather than perpendicular. You'd pretty much eliminate that bending.

I got mine more finished over the weekend. My 2" receiver is bolted to my bottom hitch plate. And with the winch tower attached there, I was worried about bending that plate (the winch tower forms a long lever arm, by comparison). So I made some some plates to tie the winch tower back to the big rod that becomes the manual sleeve hitch lever. That way much of the load is being carried by the piece that took that load originally. The U-bolts carry the load, as the tower gets pulled back, away from the tractor.

It doesn't look as nice as yours, but so far, it seems functional, in some quick testing yesterday with my ripper.

Like you said, I really like the speed of the winch, and the "infinite" travel. I can raise the implement much higher than before, and can lower the hitch all the way to the ground. I have about 19" of stroke, up from more like 3" with the manual setup. And the speed means that it doesn't matter at all if the implement needs to go up & down a lot, vs my SLOW cheap actuator :)

I had a similar goal. My winch can be installled/removed without tools. And the manual sleeve hitch functionality remains, I just remove the winch tower, and reinstall the lift bar. The winch was originally designed for the front of the tractor, for my bucket mount. So sometimes it will be used up front, instead, and the sleeve hitch will go back to being manual.
I made mine so the "tower" actually rests on the 3/4" steel bar that the manual handle slides over. This way the brunt of lifting is on the sleeve hitch and not the receiver.
 

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I made mine so the "tower" actually rests on the 3/4" steel bar that the manual handle slides over. This way the brunt of lifting is on the sleeve hitch and not the receiver.
Awesome, that's a great approach. My tower already existed, so my hands were tied a bit. And I couldn't do something like weld on pieces that would reach back to that bar on mine. Since those pieces would then hit the hood, when used on the front.

I wish I could have done it your way though. The nice thing is that it can always be changed in the future if needed.
 
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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
Awesome, that's a great approach. My tower already existed, so my hands were tied a bit. And I couldn't do something like weld on pieces that would reach to that bar on mine. Since those pieces would then hit the hood, when used on the front.

I wish I could have done it your way though. The nice thing is that it can always be changed in the future if needed.
What made it work was using a vertical insert for the receiver hitch to get the height and allow the winch mount to slide down in from the top.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Awesome, that's a great approach. My tower already existed, so my hands were tied a bit. And I couldn't do something like weld on pieces that would reach to that bar on mine. Since those pieces would then hit the hood, when used on the front.

I wish I could have done it your way though. The nice thing is that it can always be changed in the future if needed.
I needed to drill the pin holes as these were nowhere close on either end.
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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
Awesome, that's a great approach. My tower already existed, so my hands were tied a bit. And I couldn't do something like weld on pieces that would reach back to that bar on mine. Since those pieces would then hit the hood, when used on the front.

I wish I could have done it your way though. The nice thing is that it can always be changed in the future if needed.
RedOctobyr, have you ever used your sleeve hitch along with the winch to pull small shrub stumps straight up? As I've been looking at this. the one goal I had was to be able to use the winch for multiple things, but now that I see it, it appears as if I could latch around the base of the shrub and wrap around the sleeve hitch arms. Lift straight up in a manner of speaking.
 

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I have given this sort of thing a bit of thought, although admittedly at the time I was thinking more of trying to pull the little stump with the tractor, rather than using the hitch to pull it straight up.

It sounded fun to try, but I couldn't get comfortable with the idea. At best, I would get to have some fun with the tractor. But with what I was envisioning, it would be a bunch of stress on the transmission, for no particular benefit.

Instead, I attached my come-along to a nearby tree, and pulled the bush out with that. No tractor stress, and it can probably pull a lot harder than the tractor.

For a different one, I used my AC-powered 2-ton winch, attached to a different tree. This bush was bigger, and the winch was still pulling as hard as I dared (I have to stand next to it, no remote control). I had to cut each root, with the winch still pulling, before I got it out.

My concern would be that I'd only be comfortable applying several hundred pounds of force. And in doing so, it stresses the hitch, frame, and axles. God forbid, it could become very expensive, fast, if I pulled too hard. The winch is capable of way more force than I would dare apply.

By contrast, a hydraulic floor jack lifting a wooden beam (with a chain from the beam to the shrub) could apply several tons of force. Or you could mount the tractor's winch on a separate frame, positioned above the shrub, and lift that way. Or a farm jack can provide a lot of lifting distance, while still applying several thousand pounds. These could still let you pull straight up, vs sideways.

42 in. Off-Road Farm Jack

I couldn't bring myself to put those kinds of large loads on the tractor for "no reason", when I had stronger options, where the most expensive thing I could damage is a $100 jack or something.

I did consider using a block-and-tackle, with 1 end anchored to a tree, the other to the shrub, and using the tractor to pull the rope. In this case, you multiply the tractor's pulling force by a factor of, say, 8, in exchange for needing to pull further. But the tractor's fast, so it seems like a great way to play to the tractor's strengths, while letting mechanical advantage apply the BIG load to the shrub. Less stress on the tractor, but you do still need one anchor point nearby. You can't just drive up and go.

https://www.amazon.com/Super-Handy-Heavy-Duty-Capacity-Rope-Hoist/dp/B001BXJVNC
 
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I would say that is unlikely to be a good idea, as the winch can really load up a lot of pressure fast, and depending on exactly where the winch is located, it'll either just lift up the front of the tractor pretty quickly, or can put several thousand pounds of downforce on the rear axle.

I think using a lever/pulley at a 45 degree angle, so the winch pulls sideways, and the lever/pulley translates it to a vertical pulling force is the way to do it safely (albiet it probably can't generate as much force, as it probably will move the tractor before it gets near the maximum force the winch can generate).l
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
I would say that is unlikely to be a good idea, as the winch can really load up a lot of pressure fast, and depending on exactly where the winch is located, it'll either just lift up the front of the tractor pretty quickly, or can put several thousand pounds of downforce on the rear axle.

I think using a lever/pulley at a 45 degree angle, so the winch pulls sideways, and the lever/pulley translates it to a vertical pulling force is the way to do it safely (albiet it probably can't generate as much force, as it probably will move the tractor before it gets near the maximum force the winch can generate).l
It was merely a thought but after reading all the concerns I agree with both of you. I do have a 4 pulley block and tackle that can be used along with the winch being mounted remotely and not attached to the tractor. I finally got everything wired, 100 amp inline breaker near the battery, all wires run in loom, quick disconnects under the hood and at the winch along with a cushioned mount on the right side oh [email protected]* handle for the controller. Easy on/off no tools required assembly. Seems to work flawlessly so far however I have only attached 100lbs.
 

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Good idea, dave_r, sorry, I forgot about that tip. I've seen people talk about using things like a car wheel (or car wheel + tire), to turn the horizontal pull into vertical.

One example:

Now you can lift basically straight up, and be fairly mobile, but still pull really hard.
 

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I finally got everything wired, 100 amp inline breaker near the battery, all wires run in loom, quick disconnects under the hood and at the winch along with a cushioned mount on the right side oh [email protected]* handle for the controller. Easy on/off no tools required assembly. Seems to work flawlessly so far however I have only attached 100lbs.
That's great! Can't wait to see it in action. Pics anyways, and maybe even a video could be cool.

I still need to make a stronger pulley for mine, where the cable doubles-back, so I haven't yet put a big load on it. I will likely machine something simple, but I tried 3D printing a stronger version of what I printed (and broke) the other day, just to see how it does.
 
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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
That's great! Can't wait to see it in action. Pics anyways, and maybe even a video could be cool.

I still need to make a stronger pulley for mine, where the cable doubles-back, so I haven't yet put a big load on it. I will likely machine something simple, but I tried 3D printing a stronger version of what I printed (and broke) the other day, just to see how it does.
I will try and get some pics this weekend and maybe a video lifting and lowering the box blade. If I can figure out how to attach a video in the thread. LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
Just some more pics of the final wiring including the switch mount. The pic doesn't make it clear but the toolbox and cup holder are both accessible. When not in use or removed the front and rear wiring bundles tuck nicely in the rear seat cover pocket.
I've still got 2 inches more lift and will lower to the ground.
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I will try and get some pics this weekend and maybe a video lifting and lowering the box blade. If I can figure out how to attach a video in the thread. LOL.
Definitely gets more lift than the manual handle. I still have another 2 inches of lift available. Lifted the blade and 4 suitcase weights with ease.
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Nice work, that looks great! Really nice job with it. I can't wait to see how it does when you really put it to work.

I like your switch location. I have mine on the dashboard, by the steering wheel. I was expecting to just be using it while facing forward, so I put it by the wheel. But I'm realizing that by the seat is maybe a better choice.

So far, I'm encouraged by my winch. I don't know how it compares to hydraulics, but there's no way I would complain about the speed, and it should be plenty strong enough for anything I want to lift. And the super-long "stroke" should be great.

I got a cultivator last fall, and used it to chew up part of the yard. I thought the sleeve hitch was dropping it far enough, but afterwards I realized it was being held in the air just a bit. So it didn't dig as well as it could have, and steering got light, due to the cinder blocks I had on the cultivator. I thought it needed more weight to bite, but no, it was just being held up by the hitch.

So I couldn't drop it quite far enough, and neither could I raise it enough to let me drive back into the shed.

The winch should solve both of those problems. Plus being quick & easy to raise/lower it for each pass. I'm hoping it will be a Win, like yours.
 
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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
Nice work, that looks great! Really nice job with it. I can't wait to see how it does when you really put it to work.

I like your switch location. I have mine on the dashboard, by the steering wheel. I was expecting to just be using it while facing forward, so I put it by the wheel. But I'm realizing that by the seat is maybe a better choice.

So far, I'm encouraged by my winch. I don't know how it compares to hydraulics, but there's no way I would complain about the speed, and it should be plenty strong enough for anything I want to lift. And the super-long "stroke" should be great.

I got a cultivator last fall, and used it to chew up part of the yard. I thought the sleeve hitch was dropping it far enough, but afterwards I realized it was being held in the air just a bit. So it didn't dig as well as it could have, and steering got light, due to the cinder blocks I had on the cultivator. I thought it needed more weight to bite, but no, it was just being held up by the hitch.

So I couldn't drop it quite far enough, and neither could I raise it enough to let me drive back into the shed.

The winch should solve both of those problems. Plus being quick & easy to raise/lower it for each pass. I'm hoping it will be a Win, like yours.
The whole getting in and out of the shed was a huge plus for me. I've got about a 15" rise with a 6 foot ramp. With the manual lift I would have had to remove the implement outside then carry inside. Not really what I wanted to do. With the winch I had nearly 8 inches clearance going in and out/ forward or backwards. Also the switch on the handle can stay in place or be removed with the harness due to quick connects on both ends and a bolt and wing nut holding it in place. I wound up using an LED roll bar mount with rubber inserts as to not make marks in the handle or have to drill holes anywhere else.
 
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