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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright all, I'm going to try and keep this somewhat short and simple. I'm working with an X570 and just placed an order for the manual sleeve hitch since I was not able to find an electric model that didn't involve drilling into the rear mount bracket or frame. I will be converting the manual to power with the use of a linear actuator like many others have already done. My question is, does anyone have a actuator they have used and can speak to its quality and or price? I am wanting one with a lifting capacity of 4-500 lbs and downforce typically in the same range. I do believe a 4-6" travel should be sufficient.
 

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Just remember with that level of downforce, you'll unload the rear end and not have much for traction. You have to get to a pretty big machine to have a 3 point with downforce.

Better plan is hang a couple weights on whatever you want to dig in.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just remember with that level of downforce, you'll unload the rear end and not have much for traction. You have to get to a pretty big machine to have a 3 point with downforce.

Better plan is hang a couple weights on whatever you want to dig in.
The downforce wasn't really a deal killer as I am aware weights can be hung on most attachments. Just wasn't sure of an actuator that would have that much of a swing in push/pull force.
 

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You might be able to call or email Johnny Products to see if what they have could be used on your JD.


I have their electric sleeve hitch upgrade for my XT3 GSX:

2507641
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You might be able to call or email Johnny Products to see if what they have could be used on your JD.


I have their electric sleeve hitch upgrade for my XT3 GSX:

View attachment 2507641
That was an option I was looking at. They do offer the actuator on their site. It comes with a hefty price but I'm sure they are using what has proven to last and perform well.
 

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What's your budget for the actuator? I bought a $40 eBay 6" 6000N (1320 lbs) actuator. It's cheap, but it's slow :) I think 5mm/sec, or about 5 seconds per inch.

My intent was to use it for my sleeve hitch. I bought 6" because I wanted to make sure I had plenty of stroke.

However, that's going to make it a bit tougher to mount, since it's long enough that it would want to hit my rear fender, if I mounted it to the sleeve hitch frame. So I may need to position that top mount of the actuator further back, so it clears the tractor's body. That will make mounting it a bit more awkward, I think. But my goal would be "plenty" of up and down stroke.

Mine claims 6000N/1320 lbs of push. And 4000N/880 lbs of pull. I'm not sure why pulling would be less strong than pushing, but that's what they show.

If you want to go faster, for cheap, you need to pick one with less pounds of force. Or pony up more money for one that's fast and strong :)

My situation now has me wondering about using my 2500 lb winch (built to raise/lower my bucket on the front) on the back, to run the hitch. It's much faster, and stronger than the cheap actuators. Plus is has infinite "stroke", so you really just need to mount it high enough, then you can lift the hitch as high as you want. But it couldn't provide any downforce.
 
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Keep in mind that leverage enters the equation for lifting force. Any implement will be behind the sleeve hitch. A 200 lb weighted implement is going to use a sizable portion of a 500 lb actuator's capability, if not exceed it by a bunch. A 2" hydraulic cylinder with a 4" stroke brings over 2000 lb of lifting force to the task.

Try a 1000 lb actuator as a minimum. A 1500 lb actuator would be better and have a longer service life.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What's your budget for the actuator? I bought a $40 eBay 6" 6000N (1320 lbs) actuator. It's cheap, but it's slow :) I think 5mm/sec, or about 5 seconds per inch.

My intent was to use it for my sleeve hitch. I bought 6" because I wanted to make sure I had plenty of stroke.

However, that's going to make it a bit tougher to mount, since it's long enough that it would want to hit my rear fender, if I mounted it to the sleeve hitch frame. So I may need to position that top mount of the actuator further back, so it clears the tractor's body. That will make mounting it a bit more awkward, I think. But my goal would be "plenty" of up and down stroke.

Mine claims 6000N/1320 lbs of push. And 4000N/880 lbs of pull. I'm not sure why pulling would be less strong than pushing, but that's what they show.

If you want to go faster, for cheap, you need to pick one with less pounds of force. Or pony up more money for one that's fast and strong :)

My situation now has me wondering about using my 2500 lb winch (built to raise/lower my bucket on the front) on the back, to run the hitch. It's much faster, and stronger than the cheap actuators. Plus is has infinite "stroke", so you really just need to mount it high enough, then you can lift the hitch as high as you want. But it couldn't provide any downforce.
I may just go the route of buying one from JB. 4" stroke. $260 for it but at least I know what I'm getting. Still open for suggestions though. I like the idea of $40 and the ability for downforce even if it has more than needed. I was reading another post from a while ago where a guy used a tilt/trim unit from an outboard. Sounded intriguing to say the least. Being on the lake here, I can come up a complete unit fairly cheap, they are hydraulic but run off 12V. Downside is they are pretty darn heavy and bulky.
 

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TUDOR, that was why I went with a comparatively strong actuator, even if it's slow. I have a 300 lb weight box for the sleeve hitch. I figured I'd rather use one that is strong enough to lift what I need, even if it's slow.

Patience can deal with it being slow, if needed. But patience won't help if it just can't lift the item.
 

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Johnny Bucket uses Thomson Actuators. Look Thompson online and you'll have many choices...including electric/hydraulic....their staff is pretty helpful.
Scott
 
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An outboard tilt 'n trim needs to be heavy. The prop is underwater and the hydraulics are not. Leverage, again, only this time it is the leverage of the prop thrust at speed while adjusting the trim for more speed.

How much thrust does a 100 hp outboard generate?
 

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I may just go the route of buying one from JB. 4" stroke. $260 for it but at least I know what I'm getting. Still open for suggestions though. I like the idea of $40 and the ability for downforce even if it has more than needed. I was reading another post from a while ago where a guy used a tilt/trim unit from an outboard. Sounded intriguing to say the least. Being on the lake here, I can come up a complete unit fairly cheap, they are hydraulic but run off 12V. Downside is they are pretty darn heavy and bulky.
I've seen videos that show the JB actuator, it looks nice and speedy. Seems like the choice depends on priorities, budget vs usability. It's at least nice to have the option to do it for cheap, if that's helpful.

Personally, I figured that at $40, this one was worth a shot, if nothing else as a proof of concept. And if I really like the motorized hitch, but it's too slow, I can keep an eye out for alternatives.

The trim unit sounds interesting! I hadn't heard about that as an option. For curiosity, what sort of pricing are those, used?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I've seen videos that show the JB actuator, it looks nice and speedy. Seems like the choice depends on priorities, budget vs usability. It's at least nice to have the option to do it for cheap, if that's helpful.

Personally, I figured that at $40, this one was worth a shot, if nothing else as a proof of concept. And if I really like the motorized hitch, but it's too slow, I can keep an eye out for alternatives.

The trim unit sounds interesting! I hadn't heard about that as an option. For curiosity, what sort of pricing are those, used?
They can range from $300- $500 used and up. I can most likely come up with one for $100 or so but will need to hit up the local marine salvage yards and a few buddies.
 

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What's your budget for the actuator? I bought a $40 eBay 6" 6000N (1320 lbs) actuator. It's cheap, but it's slow :) I think 5mm/sec, or about 5 seconds per inch.

My intent was to use it for my sleeve hitch. I bought 6" because I wanted to make sure I had plenty of stroke.

However, that's going to make it a bit tougher to mount, since it's long enough that it would want to hit my rear fender, if I mounted it to the sleeve hitch frame. So I may need to position that top mount of the actuator further back, so it clears the tractor's body. That will make mounting it a bit more awkward, I think. But my goal would be "plenty" of up and down stroke.
Instead of moving the top mount, try moving the bottom mount to below the sleeve hitch.
 

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I got one of these https://www.princessauto.com/en/12v-dc-4-in-stroke-2000-lb-linear-actuator/product/PA0008862526 to handle raising/lowering duty for the mount I made to use a snowblower & brush with one of my hydro walkbehind mowers (it was about $300 on sale IIRC). I selected that one because all the actuators PA sold were about the same speed, so I picked one with a high load rating and a short throw, so I could use leverage to get more speed with raising/lowering (as it gets used a lot doing snow removal). It worked very well during the last winter.
 

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The problem with the linear actuators is two fold. If you want good quality, you're paying for it. And if you want good load capability, it's going to be slow.

I've got one that I was using for the same reason with a 2000 pound force and it's painfully slow, but I needed it as I was overloading the 1200 pound one. I've always thought about using two of the lower force, but faster, actuators that are usually cheaper to obtain the lifting force needed at a better speed.

Either way, whatever you do add in a sloted lower mount, this will give you some type of float. Then when you put weights on your implement to dig, it can float as the tractor moves around.
 

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You might want to try Surplus center for what you need...I just got an email from them this morning and the have really expanded their product lines
 

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The problem with the linear actuators is two fold. If you want good quality, you're paying for it. And if you want good load capability, it's going to be slow.

I've got one that I was using for the same reason with a 2000 pound force and it's painfully slow, but I needed it as I was overloading the 1200 pound one. I've always thought about using two of the lower force, but faster, actuators that are usually cheaper to obtain the lifting force needed at a better speed.

Either way, whatever you do add in a sloted lower mount, this will give you some type of float. Then when you put weights on your implement to dig, it can float as the tractor moves around.
I'd been thinking about trying to put together a "DIY" actuator. The basic idea was a 12V cordless drill (preferably a decent one, with a 2-speed gearbox), with the chuck turning a threaded rod. Then add some pieces to the rod, one of which is basically a nut, and provides the up/down travel.

But it was going to be a bunch of stuff to figure out, and still probably not be as good as a basic actuator. The main advantage was the 2-speed gearbox, and more-powerful motor. Low gear for high-force, high gear for high-speed.

I've wondered what's involved in replacing the motor in a cheap actuator, with something faster and more powerful. The guts of the actuator can presumably handle the rated force. But if you can spin it faster with a more powerful motor, that would be nice.

Two actuators in parallel would probably work, assuming that they slow down under a load. That would let whichever one might be lagging behind "catch up", if one was slightly more extended than the other.

Alternately, connecting two high-force ones in series would maintain their force, but double the speed. You could even put 2 different ones in series, a high-force, and a high-speed. Move the high-speed one when that's strong enough. And move the high-force one when that's required.

Or pony up for a nice one, but where's the fun in that? :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The problem with the linear actuators is two fold. If you want good quality, you're paying for it. And if you want good load capability, it's going to be slow.

I've got one that I was using for the same reason with a 2000 pound force and it's painfully slow, but I needed it as I was overloading the 1200 pound one. I've always thought about using two of the lower force, but faster, actuators that are usually cheaper to obtain the lifting force needed at a better speed.

Either way, whatever you do add in a sloted lower mount, this will give you some type of float. Then when you put weights on your implement to dig, it can float as the tractor moves around.
Thank you for the advise on the slotted lower hole. I had seen that mentioned on another site.
 

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Or pony up for a nice one, but where's the fun in that? :)
Exactly!!! :giggle:

All great ideas, never thought of them in series, but makes sense. Only downside is the length of it all. I like the two speed gearbox idea.

I've also thought about using the powered trailer jacks for something, but they're rather large.

Most of the "heavy duty" knock off actuators are knock offs of the Thompson design, so they're somewhat interchangable as I've torn most of them apart. There's a lot of gearing going on inside those, so the motors aren't very powerful. I wonder if a brushless motor from a RC car could be adapted to fit, those things can spin really fast and have a bunch of power....but there goes the budget.
 
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