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If like my yard the light rear will tare up just as much as adding weight would.
Yep, but right now I don't really need to do much, we will be getting mulch and topsoil in April so then we'll be giving it a workout. No need right now to tear up the yard more than it already is.
Is that the loader type that Carlos in Florida sells that's on there?
No this one is hydraulic from Little Buck Loader out of Illinois, Carlos makes them with electric actuators for machines that don't have hydraulics. They are very similar looking though!!
 

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Wish I could do more evaluation of it, but my yard is like a bog right now with all the rain. I need to add weight to the rear but if I do I'll bury my machine somewhere in the yard! Hoping to see some dryer weather in April!!
Dryer weather in April?...Have you forgotten the old saying? April Showers bring May flowers? 😁 I hope so too,though...we have been getting a lot of rain here on LI
 

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Woke up this morning from the rain last night and most of back yard was under water! It drains pretty quickly but sure does keep things soggy! No loader work for a while!!
 

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Sears Suburban FEL with linear actuators. Built this over the winter. Just wanted something that I can load mulch with. That's why the bucket is narrow but deep to maneuver around shrubs. The lower lift arms are rated at 900lbs. The bucket actuators are rated at 200lbs. View attachment 2457249
You are going to love it! Building my loader is one of the most fulfilling projects I have ever done.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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For those that have built your own front end loader..... Is it worth buying the bucket instead of building? I see buckets on Craigslist for $200-$300 quite often. Didn't know if it was worth going that route considering the amount of steel and welding needed.
 

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For those that have built your own front end loader..... Is it worth buying the bucket instead of building? I see buckets on Craigslist for $200-$300 quite often. Didn't know if it was worth going that route considering the amount of steel and welding needed.
Just depends. For a GT a lot of full sized buckets are too heavy. I used a Swisher ATV bucket and it's a bit too thin. Consensus is that 1/8" is a good GT size. Figure out what size you need and call your local fab shop and ask them what it would cost to bend up the shell of a bucket in 1/8" mild steel. Then figure out what else you need for steel. Here's my local steelyard with decent prices
 
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steel from my supplier here in western Massachusetts was just under $1 per lb.earlier this year. 1/8" plate is 5 lbs per square foot. so figure a 48" wide bucket x 42" from blade to top edge will be 14 sq. ft. x 5 lbs = 70 lbs or $70. plus the flat stock blade, 1/4" x 3" x 4 ft. (2.55 lbs / ft) = $10.20, , side cutters a few bucks, top stiffener angle iron 1 1/4" x 3/16 x 4 ft. (1.48 lbs / ft) = $5.92 then some 3 x 3 x 3/16" angle bolted on for the connections on the back to boom and cylinders, 4 pcs 12" long (3.70 lbs / ft) = $14.80, total bucket materials $100.92 plus tax. my local fab guy just charged me $60 to bend up two buckets, so add another $30 for bending = $130.92, oh, forgot to add the two sides, say another 4 sq ft, = $20 so $150 for materials and labor plus tax to bend a bucket in my neighborhood. this is one i made 22 years ago, 42" wide. btw, bolting on allows you to unbolt the bucket and bolt on a pallet fence for forks. (y)

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Post #8 on page 1 of this thread has a pic of my tractor with the bucket that I built in 1984. It's a copy of the original 67 lb, 40" wide, round back bucket found on KwikWay loaders in the '70s, but scaled up 35% to 54" wide x 22" deep and high with a 1/2x4" cutting edge, 6 pcs of 3/16x1.5x3" stiffeners for the 90° bend in the top edge that double as attaching points for chain shackles for lifting, and 3/8 thick mounts. Weight is 210 lb. The main body was sheared from a 4x8' sheet of 1/8" plate along with the end plates.

I worked at a steel mill and the metal was purchased at scrap pricing, about $0.17/lb.

Time to build and paint, about 16 hours, including travel time to and from the shop where I had the steel sheared, rolled and bent. Shop time was 45 minutes. The longest part of the making the structure was shaping the curve of the end plates to fit the profile of the bucket body. Welding required was 80" for the inside corner of each of the end plates to the body, 54" for the body to the top of the cutting edge, about 20" of stitch welding for the back edge of the cutting edge, about 12" for each side cutter extension of the cutting edge, about 18" of stich welding to attach each of the 4 mounting brackets, and 8" for each of the top stiffeners. Roughly 380" of welding, mostly 6011 rod, but the front of the cutting edge was 7024 rod for the smother finish.

I have 5 attachment for the loader, but that bucket is the primary with about 1800 hours of service. It has excavated, or otherwise moved, several hundred cubic yards of granular material (dirt, sand, gravel, and sinter) and several thousand yards of snow, lifted various weights up to 1250 lb using either the cutting edge or the top edge attaching points. The cutting edge has a 5/16" wow caused by the welding practice used in construction, not by lifting the butt end of 2200 lb logs. The top edge is still straight, even after standing the tractor with 865 lb of rear end ballast on its front tires while pulling 10" concrete piers out of the ground. (For the uninitiated, that's about a 2000 lb lifting force bearing on one attachment point in the center of the top edge.)

Struck volume capacity is 9 cu-ft, or about 800 lb of dirt. The cutting edge has been redressed just once in 22 years of service. If I ever get the tractor going again, the edge is due for another redressing.

No welds were cracked or separated in the service provided by this bucket. lol
 

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Can I join the club now that I can actually "load" something >1" off the ground?

This started as a Swisher ATV bucket with rear pivot and trip dump. I converted it to hydraulics but it would only dump with the front bucket edge flat on the ground. I moved the pivot point forward reinforcing the bucket on the sides and front and built all new arms for it, added a new curl cylinder and just got it painted and decaled.

It'll now dump into my carts with the bucket edge at 31" high.

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to all the loader builders posting in this thread i award my "D.I.Y. Warrior" quote from the Theodore Roosevelt speech - man in the arena.

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes short again and again, because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who actually strives to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly. So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat." --

Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919), "Man in the Arena" speech, April 23, 1910
 

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Considering that this is in the Lawn and Garden Tractor Accessories sub forum, not really. Those tracks didn't do the grass any good when it was backed into position.
 
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