My Tractor Forum banner

1781 - 1794 of 1794 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
The 7014 is an iron powder rod that is best used in the flat position. As you indicated they are very easy to slag and most times the slag will curl up and fall off. Definitely a low penetration,general purpose rod. The 7018 on the other hand is a low hydrogen rod that has to be kept in a dry environment. When I used to weld on the M1-Abrams tank our low hydrogen rods(116-G) were kept in small ovens in order to keep the coating dry and moisture free. Of course,I'm talking about X-Ray quality welds with that rod.
One thing to keep in mind about welding is that once you get the hang of it it's not that hard to make a really pretty visual weld. Pretty welds however are not always the strongest.
You're doing good so keep after it!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
673 Posts
Thanks RonW. I really like these two rod types. They are both very easy to work with. I still need to improve my technique, but this little welder should help that go faster.

i do know about the 7018 rod oven requirements but my work never leaves my property and I don't foresee a rod oven in my future, so I can live with open air 7018.

Right now I'm just delighted I can burn the 3/32 diameter. It makes finding rods to buy so much easier. The 7018 was Forney brand and I'm very interested in trying the Lincoln Fleetweld rod to compare. The Forney had a really easy to see distinct puddle which I liked.
 

·
Tractor Nerd
Joined
·
3,238 Posts
Not the proper way. But for 7018's, if I plan on welding with them lets say tomorrow. I have a toaster oven I throw them in. About 250F for a long period works. If I was in a hurry, 400F for around 2 hours.

I've welded many things with 7018 and no oven. They seem fine, it's not a weld tested for perfection. But also never had it fail yet. Even like things as hitches or trailers. Still holding up after all these years.

Some guys will stick a 7018 and you can see the moister smoke from it.

 

·
Tractor Nerd
Joined
·
3,238 Posts
Have seen something similar to those in a welding catalog. They sound like a good rod. 110 for 50 pounds is a pretty good deal.

Not often do I weld something that tensile strength is super important, once in a while I have to take that into account. But don't let the 60-70-110 discourage you from using a welding rod. Lot of things come to play when welding. You could weld something with a 110,000 tensile strength rod. By mixing of the rod, and the iron thing you are welding. Can weaken the weld. It's sort of like mixing 110,000 welding rod and piece of typical iron, with a 20,000 tensile strength. Most likely that joint would not support 110,000 pounds.

Think I will order some and try them out. I just ordered a AHP 200, so need some different rods to play with. I will have it broke-in, in no time.
 

·
Rebuilding my First JD GT
Joined
·
3,307 Posts
I just paid $64.00 shipped for a box of Lincoln Excalibur 1/8 in. x 14 in. 7018-A1 MR Electrode 50 lb. I'm sure it'll last me the next 5 or more years. :fing32:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
A Lobster boat exhaust made of stainless SCH10.
everything was layed out and welded on the bench from measurements taken on the boat. original exhaust went out the turbo and straight up but the Capt wanted to move it to the port side gunwale to make more room to work.
The original, also was not serviceable. This one has 3 custom machined stainless flanges which allow removal for servicing of engine and the flexpipe.




installed a Bung for an EGT gauge which also doubled as a purge fitting during assembly.






Different boat but here is a water mixing manifold i built for a generator which was also stainless.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,014 Posts
Very nice work! :fing32:

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,944 Posts
Welded a steel rod across for support , and beefed up the corners on 2 of the week spots where they snapped on one of my OTC cab brackets.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
This is a piece of 2" sch 40 iron pipe I just welded to the bottom (now top) of a propane tank being turned into a sandblaster. The welder is a Hobart Handler 210MVP running Hobart Flux core .030 E71T-11 with the welder set at 2 for the voltage and 20 for the feed rate on a 240volt circuit.
Any suggestions or pointers for improvement?

P.s. I am perfectly aware of the hazards of pressure vessels and propane tanks. This one was properly purged before beginning and will be hydro tested to 300 psi before being used as a blaster with a max working pressure of 100psi.


Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
Thank you, guess I'll need to grab some scrap pipe to practice on, flat, horizontal, and overhead pieces (no curve) I can do easy and have look good.

It did pass hydro, so all is good there. If I sounded defensive, it was because of what I saw(all these people saying how dangerous it is, which proper testing helps negate)when trying to find out how thick a propane cylinder end walls are.

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
 

·
TE Writer!
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
Discussion Starter #1,794
Surprised to see this thread continued after my disappearance!!

I can honestly say I'm no longer a full time pipe welder after 19 years. I had my fill and cant stand the sight of pipe or fittings but still have the love for welding and fabrication, that'll be with me forever!! I started last year with a company that does mobile railcar maintenance are repair. I do though have a nice Miller w/ air pac combo on my work truck, still welding but only here and there.
Hopefully this thread isnt dead!!
 
1781 - 1794 of 1794 Posts
Top