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My kid @ W.H. gift shop:
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
about to put down laminate over fir

the laminate comes with some sort of foam backing stuck to it.

the fir floor I am putting it on sometimes flexes and in one room it is a little lower or bowled towards the center.

so question is; has anyone put that foam underlayment down on a wood floor, in addition to having laminate that has the foam or rubber backing?

my desire is to fill any gap there may be or pockets, by the sloping floor. my concern is that too much soft padding and the click-lock ribs of the flooring is going to take to much weight and not handle it

experience in this, anyone?

thanks
 

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You say your current flooring (fir) flexes? Is there a reason for this?

I've installed alot of laminates, from exspensive to cheap. And
I've always tried to re-nail anything thats loose or squeeking.

As far as the "bowl". Is it bad enough that a single piece of laminate shows this? If so, I'd consider using a floor leveling compound and try to straightin it out, the best you can.
Another thing you could consider, if your current floor is really rough. Lay 1/4" lauen, and then lay your laminate.

Now, to answer the question. I've layed extra underlayent in certain areas to ease the shear effect of a change in elevation. I'm talkin 1/8" or less, and never had an issue. But, I really prefer not too do this.

Is there anyway you can take a pic? I'm no flooring expert, by any means. I hope this helps alittle.:thThumbsU
 

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my only experience with laminate was laying it on a slab so no flexing there.

but if your existing floor flexes i can almost guarantee you that the laminate is going to pop apart. is it the joists bowing, or is the existing flooring loose? if it is the joists you may want to reinforce them. if it is just the floor boards why not pop them up and just lay a new subfloor if needed?

don't forget the vapor barrier, without it the laminate will soak up moisture from below and really bow up on you! my BIL installs flooring for a living and he said the laminate with the felt still requires VB, yet most of the DIY'ers don't put it down and he has to go in and replace a brand new floor most of the time.
 

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don't forget the vapor barrier, without it the laminate will soak up moisture from below and really bow up on you!
I suspect that's a Southerner thing; I've never seen this done in the Midwest. I doubt his Alaskan house has the same humidity issues. ;)
 

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The Magnificent
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I suspect that's a Southerner thing; I've never seen this done in the Midwest. I doubt his Alaskan house has the same humidity issues. ;)
I think it's more of a subfloor thing. In the south, many homes are built on concrete slabs.
 

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VB is cheap. Do it. Can you go across the grain of the fir to not worry about the cupping? Don't use a leveling compound on a wood floor - you'll end up with a mess.

Screw the fir down tight. Sand the cupped areas if bad.

or.....

refinish the Fir! Beautiful wood!
 

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The Admin from... Nowhere!
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When we did our very un-level concrete basement floor, we laid down Dri-Core subflooring FIRST, which came with leveling kits (little pieces of corrugated plastic you laid underneath the flooring if it wasn't sitting flat on a spot)... The Dri-Core is 2'x2' click-together stuff, so we were able to do it all ourselves (as opposed to having to put down 4x8 sheets of ply as a subfloor), and it seems to give our laminate a nice solid base to sit on... Might not be for you, because its pricey (6-7 bucks per 2x2 sheet) AND you've got an existing floor, but it was darn easy and we've had NO probs with our unlevel floor (of course, concrete doesn't flex much, but maybe the Dri-Core would give additional stability for your laminate....)
 

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My kid @ W.H. gift shop:
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Putting laminate upstairs with only the foam backing thats on it. putting bamboo downstairs with the underlayment. the crawlspace under the house goes from about 5' to 3' where the bamboo will be over. its damp or wet under the house, but mainly because i have no moisture barrier yet, and there needs a channel dug diagonally across the dirt.
but the house is dry.
the fir is old and requires much work and has a coating of a chevron ship deck petrol on it from way back. i cleaned it some and called it good, going to cover it. there is a drum sander on the island for 100/day but it wont hit the edges and i am out of time so not sanding. i would love to refinish and put verathane polyurethane like I did in WA state at my house there, but aint gonna happen.

i don't like this laminate I got and am putting down. the t&g is like a foam feel to it; catches and doesn't click with a nice snap, so have to tap into place, a lot. the ends are not flat so you see where the board end cuts are from the mfg. the bamboo is a much nicer quality.
the instructions look like they were dictated in english to a chinese person who doesnt know engrish. completely useless like tits on a wart hog.

thanks for the comments guys.
 

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My kid @ W.H. gift shop:
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
update; finished the upstairs. What a zoo going around 4 entry doors and several closets, a chimney...ungh.
Waiting on those threshold T strips to arrive. We have 10 16' baseboards stained and need measuring and cutting, install and done with flooring upstairs.
Moving into the place fully this weekend, if anyone wants to pop over and help move. I'll provide the Blue Dawg blueberry beer!
 

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My kid @ W.H. gift shop:
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
oh and put roofing paper down in the center of one bdrm to fill the bowl, it worked great. the floors hardly creak at all as I went crosswise the existing fir. Its laminate, but its nice. I have pics on my FB page, maybe someone can copy or link them to here. I am short on computer time
 

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All I can say is Good Luck. Things are only as good as the foundation. If you are covering up some bad flooring with the new stuff it will not last long. Alway best to fix the problem rather then trying to cover it up
 
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