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Discussion Starter #1
Good day all! First post on the forum, so please have patience.

I'm a volunteer at a non-profit ag museum (www.osv.org). We have a donated almost-new L3400 tractor, with a donated AB-Eagleline 2 head plow on the rear. Of course, there are no manuals or instructions for either.

I'm going nuts trying to figure out how to "adjust" the up/down of the plow attachment. There are many arms, turnbuckles, and bolt holes on both the tractor rear and the plow attachment. I can raise/lower the plow using the hydraulics, but only get it up about an inch above ground level. So naturally the shares scrape the ground/asphalt when I drive to the fields. Lower the plow, it works fine. Raise it - it sure seems it should come up a few inches higher.

Can someone please point me to where I can find an actual step-by-step initial attachment and setup of the plow to the tractor? Just fiddling with the different arms, turnbuckles, and bolt holes is really frustrating, especially with a plow that weighs nearly 500 pounds.

Thanks.
Tom in Connecticut
 

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Welcome aboard NutmegCT (Tom).
Unfortunately Kubota doesn't provide downloadable manuals, you have to purchase them from a dealer.
This site http://kubotabooks.com/AutoIndex/index.php?dir=Tractor Owners Manuals/&AutoIndex=bb4914e511b82879b92396430f094b88
does have a few and the L4400 is very similar to your L3400. It's larger but may share some similarities.
Does the top link bracket on the tractor have 2 or 3 mounting holes for the pin? If so, you can increase your lift by choosing a different hole.
The turnbuckles on the lower 3ph arms are to control implement sway. You tighten them up to keep the implement "locked" into one position.
One of your 3ph down links may have either a turnbuckle or ratchet box, this is to adjust the side by side level of an implement. Usually this pertains to plows. It also makes hookup alittle easier if your attempting to hook up on uneven ground.
Perhaps there will be someone along that knows more specific info on your model.
I did a google search on your plow model and came up with this, http://ab-eagleline.com/index.html
I recommend to contact them to see if you can get a manual/parts list from them
Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Volfandt - thanks for the suggestions. I've figured out the pin/hole adjustment idea, and the turnbuckle adjustment idea. It was just that someone like me (completely new to the "mini-plow" world) is overwhelmed trying to adjust all those things at once. Like having several mathematical variables to monkey with, each affecting the other ... and trying to do the math with a 500 pound piece of chalk!

I'll keep plugging away trying to find details on the 3400 rear hookup, and the 2-share AB plow hookup. Part of the issue might very well be that Kubota can describe its 3400, and AB can describe its 2-share, but neither company may actually describe how its own equipment should be adjusted to "mesh" with the other company's equipment.

Say - what does "3ph" mean? It's probably obvious but my brain has turned into cow manure (again)!

Thanks.
Tom
 

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Say - what does "3ph" mean? It's probably obvious but my brain has turned into cow manure (again)!

Thanks.
Tom
Three Point Hitch: top link and two sway arms. :)
 

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3ph = three point hitch.

I used to run both a single and double plow on my old Ferguson TE20 and I learned a few tricks along the way that I'll share with you.

1st off it just might be that your L3400 might not lift that plow up very high but, it should get it high enough to clear the ground for transport.

The angle of the front tip(s) of the plow have just about everything to do with it's performance. You angle the tip down too far and it'll dig too deep and bring the whole operation to a stop. I've sat still with my tall rears just a spinning away because of this :D
If you angle it too little it won't dig and just ride an inch or two below surface.

Unfortunately setting a plow to an individual tractor is a kind of a hit or miss situation so to get started, with the plow hooked up to the tractor and lowered on a flat surface, adjust the top link "in", i.e. shorten it, to raise the rear(s) of the plow shears which should start to angle the point(s) down. You don't want too much angle, just enough to where it's obvious that the point is lower than the rear of the plow shears. Keep in mind that if the point is angled too far down it'll probably scrape the ground if the 3ph isn't lifting it very high.

Now raise the plow. Tighten the lower lift arm turnbuckles, eqiually on both sides so theres no side by side sway in the plow. You want to make sure the 3ph attachment point is centered to the center line of the tractor.

Now slowly start to lower the plow until it just barely touches the ground. The plow share(s) should look fairly level with respect to the ground. If it seems to be leaning to one side, use the downlink turnbuckle which is usually on the right downlink when sitting on the tractor, (or ratchet box, whichever you have) to "plumb" up the plow stright up & down.
This should get you setup to start.

The L3400 doesn't have "draft control" (DC) as it has position control (PC) on it's 3ph. PC is good for brush hogs (BH), rear finish mowers (RFM) and various other implements but isn't the best setup for running a plow as draft control basically keeps a plow running true once you get it set right.
My old TE20 had DC so that is what I'm used to. I've never run a plow on PC but this is how I'd start out if I were to.
With the plow setup like you've got it, lower it at the point where you want to start plowing and leave the 3ph control lever in the lower/down position then in low range start off. I believe with the lever in the lower/down position the 3ph will "float" but I'm not positive on that. I do know that if the lever is returned to the middle "neutral" position that it will attempt to "lock" the hitch at that setting and we don't want to lock it, we want it to float so the plow can control it's depth.
As you go along if the plow doesn't seem to be digging and flipping the material over, put alittle more angle on the tip by turning the top line in (making it shorter), if the plow starts digging too deep which is mainly signified by bring you to a stop, turn the top link out (make it longer).
It's not unusual to have to make a few adjustments along the way but generally it's a set it and forget it type deal once you get it dialed in.
It's also not unusual to have to raise the plow slightly when you get into a patch of harder material. Generally the DC takes care of this but since you don't have DC you may run into this too.

Speed also has alot to do with it. You want to go fast enough so it doesn't take all day but slow enough to where the material your flipping over lays over nice and smoothly. Once you get everything dialed in you'll know because it's almost like poetry in motion when everything is working as designed.
You plow your rows in the same direction so the row you're plowing will lay over into the row you've just plowed. You'll drive along with your right front and rear wheels in the trough you just made on the previous cut. (this is assuming your plow lays the material to the right which my Ferguson plows did).
If someone happens along with plowing experience w/ the L3400 i'll be glad to see their recommendations and experiencs also.
Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #7
This has been a TREMENDOUS help! Thank you one and all.

We put in a a couple fields of potatoes, oats, flint corn, and rye. Also an acre of Worcester Indian pumpkins (72 hills). Now have to find a way to keep the Canada geese from eating everything!

Onward through the fog.
Tom
PS (I hear that Canada geese are "allergic" to lead ....)
 

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