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i have a kubota L345DT and i know they all start hard when cold but its very hard starting. Any tricks to a better start? It is not equipped with a compression release.
 

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Welcome aboard JDJESSECT.
How many hrs are on the engine? High hr engines tend to loose some compression which makes them harder to start.
Does it have glowplugs and do they work? Working glowplugs can make all the difference in the world on cold starts.
 

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thanks for the welcoming. It doees have glow plugs and they do work. It doesnt even think about starting if they arre not well heated up. Shes will always kick like it is going to start but it just fires and then shuts off. It acts like its flooded basically. Maybe I do not have the throttle in the proper position that it wants to start up? the machine has about 3500 hrs on it which is not a rediculous amount, but it is a good amount.
 

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Welcome JDJESSECT. Where in CT are you? They are not all hard staters. I have two, one starts good but the other it has to be 70* or warmer out to start and I still have to cycle the glow plugs. I put a lower radiator hose block heater on it and now it starts in cold weather. Should have done it before I had to but a new starter. If I can help you let me know.
 

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Im most certainly NOT a Kubota expert but it has been my experience that a combination of cycles, especially on a 30 year old tractor (L345 1978-1985) that include initial start up, run time and shut down accumulates significant ring wear. The Japanese build notoriously dependable machinery but often use softer metals in their ring composition. That, and the fact their cylinder wall lining is hard cast steel, produces ring wear rather that cylinder wall taper (and that's a good thing).

I’m thinking it’s time for a compression test to determine the amount of loss of compression. It may seem like quite an ordeal if a rebuild is necessary but if it is….It’s a matter of pulling the head, dropping the pan and removing the rod and main bearing caps. It does afford you the opportunity to ’dress’ the head, seats and valves, hone the cylinder walls, measure ring gap, and check (and replace if necessary) the rod and main bearings. She’ll be ready to go for another 30 years :)!

Mark
 
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