My Tractor Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
JD318
Joined
·
990 Posts
Don't believe it will put out enough current to handle the load...it'll fry.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,369 Posts
the regulator senses system VOLTAGE not AMPERAGE; the stator windings are where that comes from; and about electricity; something many do not know; even the largest generator, coil alternator etc ONLY puts out what energy is NEEDED; like on a car, even if you have a "120 amp" alternator, if the system is drawing 15A, the alternator will only put out 15A, that is why you gotta "load test" one to see if it puts out rated capacity.

in your house if you have a 20A circuit that does not mean that there is ALWAYS 20A on that line; if so your 3 amp alarm clock would fry but it don't; see what I mean? so as long as you get the wiring straight with it you wont fry a thing unless the regulator that you plug in, is defective
 

·
4K Poster!!!
Joined
·
4,504 Posts
A lot of those regulators shunt excess current to ground to control the output voltage. If there is no load on his system, his alternator will be putting out 20 amps of current, which would be shunted to ground. A regulator rated for 15 amps would be overloaded.
These alternators do not have an excited field to control the output like an automotive unit. They put out the max all the time.
 

·
Collector of many tractors
Joined
·
15,240 Posts
A lot of those regulators shunt excess current to ground to control the output voltage. If there is no load on his system, his alternator will be putting out 20 amps of current, which would be shunted to ground. A regulator rated for 15 amps would be overloaded.
These alternators do not have an excited field to control the output like an automotive unit. They put out the max all the time.

There is no way the electric would be shorted to ground if your not using it...
Thats one I do not believe ...
Most regulators regulate the voltage going in that produces the magnetic field to make electric...

It would burn up the stater shorted (shunted} to ground...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,369 Posts
it still would not "put out" any more than necessary at any given time; like today's kids!
if so, your ammeter would never show "center-0 amps" it would always show a "charge". but working correctly every one I have ever seen eventually dips to 0 when battery is up and no load is on the system. He will be fine.
 

·
4K Poster!!!
Joined
·
4,504 Posts
Well, I guess you know more than the Honda Motorcycle company, then. The old Triumphs and Nortons just used a Zener diode to short excess voltage to ground, too. Worked for years for them.
The more involved systems don't short the windings to ground, just a portion of the output over a certain voltage in order to keep the voltage down.
The ammeter would show 0 if it was in line with the battery lead, which it is.
 

·
10K and Climbin!
Joined
·
12,719 Posts
Lemme enter into the fray here... You wanna put in a 15A regulator in place of a 20A?? Shouldn't be a problem unless you're machine pulls close to 20A when in use.. If so the wiring in it won't support the larger demand.. So if you have a ammeter on yer machine- what did it pull before you got into this trouble? Just my $.50 worth.. :bannana:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all your help gentlemen. The reason I asked this question is because I have a cv20 2cyl Kohler, the reg. i took off is 20amp. I have about 20 15amp regs but no 20's so I was hoping I could make a substitution and save 40 or 50 bucks. (the price of a new one) I wanted to make sure I wouldn't hurt the stator because I don't have any spares. Thanks again, Mowermike
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top