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If they vibrate like everyone claims what keeps them from just wandering off once started?
Wandering off what? neutral?

Per previous, there's an over-center action going on. When you push either lever all the way forward or all the way back, the pushrod acts to keep the lever over-center at whichever end of the travel it's at.

Try this: Take the hi/lo lever (inside the bar) and push it all the way forward. you should see that it locks into position, due to the pressure from the pushrod. Now pull it all the way back. Same deal: the pressure from the pushrod tends to keep it in place. Now try it again with the fwd/rev lever (outside the bar). you should get the same effect.

The gravely transmission is really simple. It wasn't designed for user-friendliness, as much as functionality. The levers don't stick in neutral because there's no need for them to do that. They do stick in one end of travel vs the other, because those are the use-cases that you need when you're getting work done with the machine.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
Wandering off what? neutral?

Per previous, there's an over-center action going on. When you push either lever all the way forward or all the way back, the pushrod acts to keep the lever over-center at whichever end of the travel it's at.

Try this: Take the hi/lo lever (inside the bar) and push it all the way forward. you should see that it locks into position, due to the pressure from the pushrod. Now pull it all the way back. Same deal: the pressure from the pushrod tends to keep it in place. Now try it again with the fwd/rev lever (outside the bar). you should get the same effect.

The gravely transmission is really simple. It wasn't designed for user-friendliness, as much as functionality. The levers don't stick in neutral because there's no need for them to do that. They do stick in one end of travel vs the other, because those are the use-cases that you need when you're getting work done with the machine.
Guess I am going to have to get it running and see how it goes. Apparently I am worrying about nothing.
 

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No harm, no foul :)

The only dumb question is the one which didn't get asked.

One of the things we love about these old machines is precisely that they are not polished and user-friendly, in the modern sense. Nobody would ever build such a thing today, even if the consumer product safety people would let them. But they work great, in many ways better any any modern stuff costing 10 times the price.

As you say: Get her running, then play a little. You'll find that the controls are simple and effective.

I'll save you another question: A thing you'll discover is that with the engine running, and everything in neutral, the machine will want to "creep" forward. That's normal. The core parts of the transmission are two double-sided cone clutches running in an oil bath. When you push a control lever in one or another direction, you're engaging one of those clutches. But even when disengaged, there's not much clearance between the inner and outer cones, something like .020. In an oil bath, that's a draggy situation, and you'll get some coupling between the cones even though the clutch is "disengaged".

This is another non "user friendly" feature of these beasts. In practice it's no big deal. But it often comes as a surprise to new gravely owners.

have fun with your new toy!
 

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Not sure what you mean by a crimped end tank? I have a 1962 model L, and it has the flat sides on the tank. It does have a folded seam at the ends of the tank, but that is not what holds it together. It's soldered. I have had mine leak at the seam before. If you clean them out really good and get all the gas fumes out, you can take a torch and heat this seam and take a wire brush and dig all the old solder out. Then use flux paste and add new solder back in and it's good to go.

The first time I repaired it I just heated and added solder to the bad spot. That lasted a couple of years and then it started leaking again. When I heated the whole thing and brushed the old solder out and then added new, that did the trick, it hadn't leaked since.
Heres a cpl more of the tank thats on my 66 model as opposed to that flat thing on my parts tractor thats anything from a 49 to 59 or who knows.
 

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Heres a cpl more of the tank thats on my 66 model as opposed to that flat thing on my parts tractor thats anything from a 49 to 59 or who knows.
Its got the hammered & soldered lip seal around it to hold the ends on I guess. Prolly a 3 piece tank perhaps.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
No harm, no foul :)

The only dumb question is the one which didn't get asked.

One of the things we love about these old machines is precisely that they are not polished and user-friendly, in the modern sense. Nobody would ever build such a thing today, even if the consumer product safety people would let them. But they work great, in many ways better any any modern stuff costing 10 times the price.

As you say: Get her running, then play a little. You'll find that the controls are simple and effective.

I'll save you another question: A thing you'll discover is that with the engine running, and everything in neutral, the machine will want to "creep" forward. That's normal. The core parts of the transmission are two double-sided cone clutches running in an oil bath. When you push a control lever in one or another direction, you're engaging one of those clutches. But even when disengaged, there's not much clearance between the inner and outer cones, something like .020. In an oil bath, that's a draggy situation, and you'll get some coupling between the cones even though the clutch is "disengaged".

This is another non "user friendly" feature of these beasts. In practice it's no big deal. But it often comes as a surprise to new gravely owners.

have fun with your new toy!
So I am getting the since that some safety was unintentionally built into it. Like shut it down before walking away for to long or it may not be were you left it. All things we should be doing anyway.

Even my Ariens tractor has some forward creep. Just have never taken the time to eliminate it. Could be because the 3 point down pressure and the tool bar makes a great anchor.

If it quits raining and it has no fuel related issues from setting I will take it out and mow some grass this week end. Will be interesting to see how it does in close courters.
I have some areas it will do great in if floatation devices would not be required after 5 straight days of rain.
 

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I have seen springs that look better than that. But like was said, run it and try it before you mess with it. It usually won't do the creep thing very bad after the oil gets hot. It can be pretty bad when the oil is cold in cold weather. As soon as you get it running and try it, it will become clear how it works.

 

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Discussion Starter #49
I got it off the blocks today it was on for the oil change. See no reason to do the block thing again with the drain plug in the case in front of the left wheel. Did not see that neoprene washer until after giving it a bath. Other than that just watched it rain some more.
 

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Discussion Starter #50
Well check the mower gear box and had to add a little lube. Put some fuel in the tank, turned the tank shut off, wrapped the belt, pulled the air cleaner hose off the carb to check for excess fuel, closed the choke and pull the belt. On the third try it fired right up. Ran for a few minutes and quit. Would not restart. You know these things run a lot better if you don't shut the fuel off. Took three more pulls of the belt to get it running again. Doesn't sound anything like I thought it would. Went to shut it off and the kill switch doesn't work. So I just shut the fuel off again. Will have to look at the kill switch tomorrow in the day light. Mount the rear shield to the deck and go mow some grass. Will report back tomorrow,
 

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+1

Sounds like you're almost there :)
 

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So I am getting the since that some safety was unintentionally built into it. Like shut it down before walking away for to long or it may not be were you left it. All things we should be doing anyway.

Even my Ariens tractor has some forward creep. Just have never taken the time to eliminate it. Could be because the 3 point down pressure and the tool bar makes a great anchor.

If it quits raining and it has no fuel related issues from setting I will take it out and mow some grass this week end. Will be interesting to see how it does in close courters.
I have some areas it will do great in if floatation devices would not be required after 5 straight days of rain.
As to the " creeping" it has remember how old what we are talking about is .
I'd hate to think how many times the forward/reverse lever has been used lol.
 

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I got it off the blocks today it was on for the oil change. See no reason to do the block thing again with the drain plug in the case in front of the left wheel. Did not see that neoprene washer until after giving it a bath. Other than that just watched it rain some more.
Yea the rain makes me sick after awhile. It rains here every day for a month or more in spring ( basically rains all spring ) then it will stop in the summer and it wont rain hardly at all, but you loose all the work you shoulda done in the spring.
Luckilly it stopped for this weekend....supposedly that it.
 

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As to the " creeping" it has remember how old what we are talking about is .
I'd hate to think how many times the forward/reverse lever has been used lol.
The creeping isn't due to wear or age. It's a side effect of the way the clutches work.

I can't think of a way to prove it nowadays, but I would expect a newly manufactured machine to creep more than a well-used one. Because the clutches are tighter.
 

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Discussion Starter #55
Can not get the forward reverse to go into neutral so that the implement clutch can be engaged. It will disengage just fine. So far I have just been warming the engine then shutting it off engaging the clutch and starting it backup. I don't really think I want to be doing this with the snow blower in cold weather. Hope there is a simple solution but was really hoping this would correct itself with use.
Also found a proper fuel bowl and installed it and no more fuel leak. The make shift pipe plug was dripping fuel.
 

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So . . . The fwd/rev clutch doesn't do anything to the attachment. It controls the wheels only.

Hi/lo definitely affects attachment speed. You want that one in neutral before engaging the PTO to the attachment.

All that said, see previous discussion about creeping. Even with hi/lo in neutral, the pinion shaft is spinning, and you'll get some crunching when you engage the PTO. The more careful you are, the worse it gets. The preferred technique is to give the PTO control a sharp push (or pull, for a remote PTO). It'll grind a little, but that's the way it was designed to work.

Another technique: Butt the nose of the machine up against something solid, like a brick wall or a tree. Leave the hi/lo in neutral. Lock fwd/rev in fwd. Now you've stopped the pinion shaft spinning, and can engage the PTO without any drama.

With a little practice, you can use use a similar technique without the tree, by leaving hi/lo in neutral, and just tweaking the fwd/rev to the edge of reverse, to more or less stop the pinion shaft. Simultaneously pop the PTO on. This really only works if you have a remote PTO control, I don't see how you could do it with the standard style PTO.

Most of us, me included, just give the PTO a quick shove and be done with it.

All part of the fun of gravelys :)
 

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Discussion Starter #57
Ok will give it a try. Tried doing it buy just loading the high low and moving the forward reverse that did not work well. I know it will work because a wheel was caught in a hole and while going from forward to reverse the blade stopped. I have no trees close to the house but can roll it up against the house and do it.
 

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If you have steel toed boots, or even just a block of wood, what you can do is make sure the hi/lo is in neutral, put your right foot behind the tire, grab the reverse lever with your right hand and tug on it a little bit while you gently move the pto to engage. I have long arms so I could do it easily. You can let the pto lightly scrape and tug reverse and feel it slow down more and more till it drops in. You probably could cut yourself a block of wood and put behind the wheel to stop the tractor.

All this is easily done in the summer when the oil is more fluid. In cold weather the oil is very thick, so it tends to "drive" the clutches with more authority and the tractor is harder to keep from moving. You will actually hear the engine load down some, that is how much the oil is driving the driveline inside.

I have done the kick it in thing before, I cannot tolerate the crunching sound it makes. It's just something about it that makes me cringe each time I do it. So I always have a technigue of some sort to avoid it.
 
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