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Discussion Starter #1
I love my 3240's scoop/shovel--whatever you want to call it but Dang! it really lacks in dumping height over a proper loader. I've been doing dirt work today and probably hauled out 2000lbs of dirt a bucketfull at a time. Tried to dump in my cart and ran into problems. Initially set it up to drive up on my ramps but I couldn't get a proper dump.

Propped the off-side of the trailer on blocks to tilt it towards the tractor but I still had to hand shovel half of the bucket out. These things are awesome but are lacking in lift height.

The way I figure it I have 2 options if I want to dump in a trailer.
1. Reconfigure my bucket to dump from the bottom like a JB and still drive up on ramps.
2. Buy a trailer with a drive up ramp and lose the dumping feature I like about my dump cart.

Any other options I've missed?

 

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Discussion Starter #3
Build a taller ramp to dump from. Something like a portable loading dock.
yeah, that may be the only option to dump into my cart w/o a major hassle. Need to find a 50" wide drive up ramp dump cart lol.
 

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Perhaps instead of building something UP as in a ramp or other, you use the scoop to dig a hole that you set the trailer in where it is below and pulled out and in. Lift height wouldn't be a factor then. Of course that would mean a central area for the trailer and work flow instead of the haphazard do it wherever.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Perhaps instead of building something UP as in a ramp or other, you use the scoop to dig a hole that you set the trailer in where it is below and pulled out and in. Lift height wouldn't be a factor then. Of course that would mean a central area for the trailer and work flow instead of the haphazard do it wherever.
That would be a great solution that eliminates the ramp problem which decreases the dump angle. The problem with that is I have 24acres and the current work can be 300yds from the last job.

All I need is 4 hydraulic cylinders. One on each corner of the GT. Lift it straight up in the air to dump lol.
 

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I think you are seeing the entire forest and not the individual trees. Of those 24 acres, how many acres are you actually doing the work of moving the soil & rocks? Are those areas all separate on that mountaintop of yours? Digging a shallow sloped trench near each of your work areas to fit the trailer for loading would be much more efficient than dragging around, setting up and removing the ramps each time. Do you blaze a new trail to each of your work areas each time or use an already cleared path? Work site preparation makes things flow more easily with the tools you have.
The four cylinders are a neat idea, though mobility may be a problem.
 

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Just spit-balling here but it sounds to me like you need a loader.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I think you are seeing the entire forest and not the individual trees. Of those 24 acres, how many acres are you actually doing the work of moving the soil & rocks? Are those areas all separate on that mountaintop of yours? Digging a shallow sloped trench near each of your work areas to fit the trailer for loading would be much more efficient than dragging around, setting up and removing the ramps each time. Do you blaze a new trail to each of your work areas each time or use an already cleared path? Work site preparation makes things flow more easily with the tools you have.
The four cylinders are a neat idea, though mobility may be a problem.
It's one of those things where I'm thinking of the long term approach to this problem. I love bouncing ideas off you guys cuz it spurs me to think outside my box. Thanks for the input.
Just spit-balling here but it sounds to me like you need a loader.
With your talent you could build a replica of the Johnson loader for your Cub:
or
or
I could build a loader for sure. Do I want to? Not really. I like what I can do with this thing save for one problem. I think I may have it solved and it may be an answer for all low lift scoop guys fo be able to load their carts easily. Gimme a minute lol.
 

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Gravely 2-wheeler
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How about spraying the inside of the bucket with a good dose of silicone spray when it is clean and dry?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
How about spraying the inside of the bucket with a good dose of silicone spray when it is clean and dry?
Not a bad idea. In fact I have PTFE dry lube that may even be better. I'll give it a shot...of lube
 

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Gravely 2-wheeler
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If you have both lubes, try one on the left half of the bucket and the other on the right half. Mark with masking tape on the outside of the bucket which lube was used on each half. See which one lasts the longest without needing refreshing. If you only have the PTFE, try it only on one half so that if it isn't satisfactory you still have a clean surface on the other half of the bucket to try another lube.
 

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You could modify the bucket so it is like a clamshell bucket scoop,that lifts the bottom and sides away from the rear of the bucket....I made a plow.scoop bucket that way using the plow for the back of the bucket,with the sides and bottom hinged to the top of the plow...mine uses a foot pedal to dump the bucket and a winch to lift & lower it..it'll go up about 2 feet high too..
PICT0006.JPG
 

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I know nothing about that bucket but I'm wondering if the pivot points on the bucket could be changed to give it more angle?. If it's even possible. IDK.
Just a thought..
 

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Yes, could move the pivots on the bucket, at the cost of digging depth capabilities.

Smaller tires on the trailer would get it down.

Larger tires on the front of the tractor to make it taller (and ride smoother!)

I saw a hole to put the trailer in was mentioned. This is simple, but that’s a big hole. Solution would be just dig short narrow trenches just wide enough for the trailer’s tires, shallower than the depth to the axle.

I got a set of lightweight (less than 10 lb each I bet) loading ramps from TSC. Capacity around 1000-1500 for the pair. Laid flat on the ground, they’re about 7’ long and arch up in the center a good 6 or 8” at least. Bet your front tires would be about to the peak in dumping position. Support with boards in centers if a little extra support is needed.
 

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If I had that kind of land...I would give a lot of thought to buying an old farm tractor with a loader...often times I see good deals on Ford Ns or ACs. MF...much larger buckets too...as Rudedawg stated...I think you could make your own rather easily with your experience and obvious fabricating skills..you have a bucket (that is a nice bucket, too) , some cylinders and a hydraulic system on the machine...go for it...would love to see pictures as you go along ( I may be living vicariously through you)
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for all the good input fellas. I am considering changing the dump to the front of the bucket for increased dumping height. I think that would get me able to dump into the cart off ramps.

I don't want to change to a clamshell dump because that would be a ton of work although that was my first plan when I was gonna convert my snow blade to a bucket. My hitch was too far gone so I went in this direction.

I have thought about going with some shorter tires but realize that would lessen the dumping ability of the trailer.

Not a fan of digging holes to put the trailer in. So far I have needed to use this trailer several times in areas 300 yards from each other. My land and dumping needs are just too far apart to consider a permanent type loading dock.

I have a pair of ATV aluminum ramps and have considered making a taller ramp however I start getting pretty twitchy when I've got 1400lbs of GT and 300lbs of dirt in the bucket. I did hit the fwd pedal instead of the reverse pedal the other day up on the ramps and nearly drove off the front of them.

I have a plan to alter the trailer for this type of application that would solve this. Not ready to divulge the info yet but JB type scoops would highly benefit from it if it works.
 

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I've considered this problem for myself also, and after I do some cost analysis to include my time (in hrs not $), I inevitably come to the same conclusion, Full loader.

First the bad,

1) The problem as I see it with the trailer idea,

The time and money spent for something strong enough to have a forward heavy machine (scoop loaded out front of trailer edge with crowning and torsion forces on the chassis) with proper surface traction, not too steep for the transaxle and brake ability of the GT and able (trailer) to move around for a variety of surfaces while being able to keep the top surface level, becomes an engineering marvel.

This may only seem to make sense if it's just about being able to say "because I can". I have moments when that's the sole reason too, and I can appreciate that way of thinking.

2) The problem as I see it with the dig a pit,

In order to be practical you may have many holes that are somewhat unproductive that will need to be refilled. The extra wear and tear should be considered in your price and time as compared to full loader and it will be more weather dependent (peanut butter clay will stop tracks too) and the trailer now being easy to load, will get loaded, the GT will have to pull it out, and this is where grade is important again, though I think cheaper in initial cost as compared to the trailer ramp, might not be very reliable, and I'm not hitting on the roots, rocks, or buried rubbish that may be to difficult for these GT traction/torque capabilities.

Again, sometimes digging holes can be therapeutic, I too recognize the need for a man to just muscle dirt.

3) The limitations of the scoop seem to be chassis high for stability reasons (I applaud the pushing of these limitations), the chassis reinforcement required for very little actual delivered gains unfortunately, (I do speak of experience here) in the end will require the same plating and overall bracing as a full loader requires but will never deliver equal results. When done, the money spent and time spent will be similar to the full loader without the performance.

Now the good, (quick thoughts)

If you are trying to achieve 24" to clear the side (maybe a partial drop down side), 12" might be achievable with your scoop attached to a cam that swivels giving you the extra clearance without putting the scoop further in front of the tractor, the chassis will still have significant torsion if on any kind of lean like a listing boat, and if your trailer had a level airbag on the the axle you could achieve approx 6" of drop. Any combinations or just one? This might be an affordable approach.

Thinking outside the box, a hopper at ground level could be made of wood initially (until proof of concept) that your current working setup can dump in, with tilt axle and and tow tongue, that has a small motor of any kind (electric, hydraulic, gas) powering a small conveyor belt with material from Rural king or tractor supply. Make from wood at first and the belt is sold by the foot, some pulley's for approx half or less, the cost of fabricating a full loader.

:)
 

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Simple. Build as portable loading dock out of 2x8s. Pick it up when done at one location and carry it with the loader to the next location, or load it onto the trailer for hauling to the next location.

Materials needed:
  • One pce 2x8x12, cut in half for the sides.
  • One pce 2x8x12, cut in thirds for cross members.
  • Two pcs 2x6x12 cut in half for decking for the tires.
  • Fasten together with suitable deck screws.
Set it in place with 2X lumber blocking to shim at the corners to compensate for uneven ground and use available dirt for a ramp at one end.

Alternatively, use a 2x8x16 cut in half for the sides and taper the last 2' to zero for the ramp. Cover the ramp portion with 3 pcs of 2x8 lumber with a shallow dirt transition from ground to ramp.

To transport with the loader, slide the bucket under one end, curl the bucket down, attach chains or straps from the center crossmember to the top of the bucket, curl the bucket back to level and lift. It should weigh about 130 lb with the center of mass at 3' from one end for the basic loading dock. The alternative option will still have the center of mass less than 4' from the ramp end, but it will be about 25 lb heavier.

The problem with using ramps to raise only the front of the tractor is that it not only reduces the dumping angle, but also has an effect on how close the cutting edge is to the front of the tractor when dumping. You can't reach far enough across the trailer to withdraw the bucket after dumping without scooping up some of the material, as you have found.

A reduction in front to back depth of the bucket will also allow more material to remain in the trailer. GT loaders of any description will rarely fill a bucket all the way to the back when dealing with dirt or gravel. The profile of the pile of material is heavy at the cutting edge and light at the back of the bucket. A shorter bucket will result in a more uniform depth of material. The problem with that option is the loss of snow handling capability.
 
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