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JD X585 owner
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You have a 40 Loader on an X585?
 

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JD X585 owner
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Re: JD X585 loader or JD 40 loader cylinder leak

Just want to make sure you get the right assistance. Your thread title says JD X585 loader cylinder leak and then you are asking about a JD 40 Loader. The standard JD loader for a X585 tractor is a JD 45 Loader. The JD 40 Loader is for pre-X series tractors. I'm not sure if they use the same size cylinders.

So, to be clear, I take it you are looking for information regarding on repairing a cylinder leak on a JD 40 Loader.
 

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Ok, the loader on the tractor is a 40 though. Different in Canada?
No, it's just that the Green Guys are a bit finicky about original applications of attachments. Most GT sized loaders can be adapted to fit most GTs. Mine has been on a MF12H and a MF1655, and the original application was for a GE ElecTrac. These are all very different sized tractors. The one on my even bigger SCUT is the same size.

It's difficult to say if that is the right seal kit or not. There are many manufactures of 1.5" cylinders, each selecting the seals that they can get the best deal on. I just last year rebuilt a 1.5" cylinder on my MF SCUT loader. All of the seals (except the dust seal) were purchased at The Parker Store for $9.14. They didn't have a new dust seal and the old one wasn't all that old. In fact, the O-rings are in a O-ring assortment kit, along with a multitude of other sizes, that is also sold at PAL.

It comes in a red plastic case, about 5"x7" x 1.5" thick. Catalogue item 8025353 - $24.99 (2017 catalogue price, if it isn't on sale) I've had mine for about 30 years and had to replenish some sizes a couple of times.

Take the cylinder apart and take the seals to a hydraulics shop for replacements. There are 3 different seals for the gland (the plug that the rod goes through), one on the outside circumference, one on the inside of the bore for the rod, and the dust seal in the end that wipes dust off of the rod. The piston may or may not have a seal inside for the rod, but it definitely has one or more on the circumference.

Check for rust in the head (gland) end of the cylinder. That one caught me last year and I had to take it apart again and dip into my little red box for a replacement after honing out the rust.
 

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That's the one.

I guess that it's no longer made, hence the clearance sale. I just checked a US source that I have referenced for the same item many times and they no longer list it. Their new O-ring assortment.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The Windsor Princess Auto has 14 of the 8025353 in stock & on clearance for about $22 if anyone needs one for a rainy day.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hi, what is the timeline to rebuild a cylinder roughly? There is a local Hydraulics guy & when I asked him for a ballpark figure He only said he charges $50 an hour
 

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If you bring him the cylinder, I can't see it taking more than 2 to 3 hours to rebuild one, provided it doesn't need major work. (like, turned on a lathe, or something similar.....)
 

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If you can find a shop to rebuild the cylinder I think it would be well worth the money. I resealed mine a few years ago in about an hour and a half. If you are only having seal issues it shouldn't be something that takes hours.

The 40 loaders are very similar to the 45 and there is some degree of compatibility between the 40 and 45. The "Green Guys" arn't necessarily being picky as Bob likes to think... But there are rebuild kits avalible through Deere and it helps to double check the models are being listed correctly. Bob is correct that many GT style loaders fit other machines but it's always good to double check things.
 

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If you can find a shop to rebuild the cylinder I think it would be well worth the money. I resealed mine a few years ago in about an hour and a half. If you are only having seal issues it shouldn't be something that takes hours.

The 40 loaders are very similar to the 45 and there is some degree of compatibility between the 40 and 45. The "Green Guys" arn't necessarily being picky as Bob likes to think... But there are rebuild kits avalible through Deere and it helps to double check the models are being listed correctly. Bob is correct that many GT style loaders fit other machines but it's always good to double check things.
:ROF We must be reading different JD threads! I see many posts stating which model loader belongs on which JD GT, even though the identical loader is available with a different colour original paint job for a thousand dollars less. Most guys want a loader, period. The Green Guys seem to want the specific JD model loader optioned for their tractor.

The seal kit for the cylinders on my SCUT loader are available at the dealer for US$30. I picked up all the seals except the dust seal from my local hydraulics shop for about US$6.50 (C$9.14). I feel quite confident that the dust seal does not cost US$23.50.

When I also calculate the costs of going to the dealer or to the hydraulics shop, the difference in cost is substantially greater, as is the difference in time required.
 

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:ROF We must be reading different JD threads! I see many posts stating which model loader belongs on which JD GT, even though the identical loader is available with a different colour original paint job for a thousand dollars less. Most guys want a loader, period. The Green Guys seem to want the specific JD model loader optioned for their tractor.

The seal kit for the cylinders on my SCUT loader are available at the dealer for US$30. I picked up all the seals except the dust seal from my local hydraulics shop for about US$6.50 (C$9.14). I feel quite confident that the dust seal does not cost US$23.50.

When I also calculate the costs of going to the dealer or to the hydraulics shop, the difference in cost is substantially greater, as is the difference in time required.
If it was the 1960-1980's you would be correct. Brantly, Johnson, Soo, Kwik Way, Wright Way, Danco all made loaders for Deere GTs.... And yes if you collect Deere GTs correct mounting brackets ARE important. If you just want a loader, fab some up. Since the 90's the 40 and 45 loader were only found on Deere 4-5 and X units. In this case most of the older loaders (brands listed above) do not readily fit the X units. The tractors are too wide.

Going to the dealer is generally more expensive.... And I am certain it would be in this case. However, sometimes the dealer is the easiest option... For example if you don't have a local hydraulic shop... Or you don't have the time to search for all the seals online. My point is leading into a post about Green Guys being picky isn't necessarily the best way to proceed when chances are other posters were only trying to be helpful and use the knowledge they have.......

Hopefully the OP can have the hydraulic shop rebuild the leaky cylinder and he problem will be solved. :tango_face_grin:
 

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If it was the 1960-1980's you would be correct. Brantly, Johnson, Soo, Kwik Way, Wright Way, Danco all made loaders for Deere GTs.... And yes if you collect Deere GTs correct mounting brackets ARE important. If you just want a loader, fab some up. Since the 90's the 40 and 45 loader were only found on Deere 4-5 and X units. In this case most of the older loaders (brands listed above) do not readily fit the X units. The tractors are too wide.

Going to the dealer is generally more expensive.... And I am certain it would be in this case. However, sometimes the dealer is the easiest option... For example if you don't have a local hydraulic shop... Or you don't have the time to search for all the seals online. My point is leading into a post about Green Guys being picky isn't necessarily the best way to proceed when chances are other posters were only trying to be helpful and use the knowledge they have.......

Hopefully the OP can have the hydraulic shop rebuild the leaky cylinder and he problem will be solved. :tango_face_grin:
That's all well and good, I'm just trying to present options to going to a dealer. Yes, I do understand that collectors, in particular, are going to be picky about which loader belongs to which tractor, but most of us are not collectors. We're just trying to have and maintain a loader for the least outlay of available funds.

Keep in mind that you have tractor dealers in abundance. I don't. In an area the size of MI and WI combined, there are a total of 5 JD dealers in Northern Ontario, and the two most central are well over 400 miles apart. However, with the mining and forestry industries, hydraulics shops are considerably more plentiful. Auto parts stores are also often known to carry the necessary O-rings and seals.

Copy and Paste Thunder Bay into the address box. Dealers 1 and 2 are almost 500 miles apart by road, about 400 by air.

https://dealerlocator.deere.com/servlet/country=CA?locale=en_CA

For me, the nearest JD dealership is in MI about 8 miles from my home, but I have to cross a toll bridge with border agents, and the inevitable delays engendered, at both ends.
 
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