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I just replaced all 5 o-rings, both steering cylinder hoses and the pump to valve hose due to a leak. One of the cylinder hose orings began to leak and when disassembling I noticed all three lines had pretty bad rub wear at the supporting bracket mounts. I did not want to do this again so I just went all in. Make sure if you pull the lines you have a reminder of how they went. Don't ask me how I know but nothing works if any are routed wrong. LOL. I found this while searching through some posts and it helped tremendously when identifying the issue I had. View attachment 2524237
You found my old post. When I did mine the end was loose on one of the lines. You could spin it. So even with a new o-ring it could still leak so I replaced the line. Also could be a crack in one that's hard to see.
 

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2019 JD X570, 1996 JD 445, 2003 L110, 1978 212
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You found my old post. When I did mine the end was loose on one of the lines. You could spin it. So even with a new o-ring it could still leak so I replaced the line. Also could be a crack in one that's hard to see.
The OP fixed it by replacing the orings again. I believe he was using locally purchased orings that were not the correct size. JD or Aux Hydraulics are the only ones I seen that will work.
 

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2019 JD X570, 1996 JD 445, 2003 L110, 1978 212
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You found my old post. When I did mine the end was loose on one of the lines. You could spin it. So even with a new o-ring it could still leak so I replaced the line. Also could be a crack in one that's hard to see.
@drs455aws your diagram saved my butt. I had (don't ask me how) the bottom two lines crossed. The hard line that feeds the aux valve and one of the steering cylinder hoses.
The diagram and pics I took before disassembly apparently were not clear enough for these old eyes. I replaced all o-rings on the 445 along with both cylinder hoses and the pump to valve hose. The only hoses remaining are the rear lift cylinder hoses but they look to be in great shape for now.
 

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O-rings 101:
By definition, an o-ring is. "a gasket in the form of a ring with a circular cross section, typically made of pliable material, used to seal connections in pipes, tubes, etc."
The "ring" must be the correct OD, ID, and circular cross section. These can be easily determined with a pair of )cheap) calipers.
And then there's a "pliable material". This narrows the selection down to 1 or 2 of possibly hundreds of choices! Each material has specifications to make it compatible with whatever fluids it is trying to seal. It also has a specific hardness, Duro reading, depending on how it's used as in pressure, static, sliding, etc.

Most common o-rings are identified by a dash number, IAW AS568. A 5/16" x 1/8" o-ring would be a dash 203 or -203. As with most plumbing, what you measure is NOT the actual size that you want! A 5/16" o-ring is actually .296" inside diameter and 1/8" thick/cross section actually measures .139" !!

Most commercially available o-rings are made for water or petroleum based fluids. O-rings for water are typically made from EDPM (Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer), work fine for water, and turn to mush after exposure to a petroleum based fluid, like hydraulic oil! O-rings use for petroleum based are typically made from Nitril or tradename Buna-N. Some pre-packaged o-rings have size, material, and hardness marked on them and some only have the size. If it's not identified fully, don't get it! Bob
 
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Premium Member
2019 JD X570, 1996 JD 445, 2003 L110, 1978 212
Joined
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747 Posts
O-rings 101:
By definition, an o-ring is. "a gasket in the form of a ring with a circular cross section, typically made of pliable material, used to seal connections in pipes, tubes, etc."
The "ring" must be the correct OD, ID, and circular cross section. These can be easily determined with a pair of )cheap) calipers.
And then there's a "pliable material". This narrows the selection down to 1 or 2 of possibly hundreds of choices! Each material has specifications to make it compatible with whatever fluids it is trying to seal. It also has a specific hardness, Duro reading, depending on how it's used as in pressure, static, sliding, etc.

Most common o-rings are identified by a dash number, IAW AS568. A 5/16" x 1/8" o-ring would be a dash 203 or -203. As with most plumbing, what you measure is NOT the actual size that you want! A 5/16" o-ring is actually .296" inside diameter and 1/8" thick/cross section actually measures .139" !!

Most commercially available o-rings are made for water or petroleum based fluids. O-rings for water are typically made from EDPM (Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer), work fine for water, and turn to mush after exposure to a petroleum based fluid, like hydraulic oil! O-rings use for petroleum based are typically made from Nitril or tradename Buna-N. Some pre-packaged o-rings have size, material, and hardness marked on them and some only have the size. If it's not identified fully, don't get it! Bob
Better yet, get the ones listed specifically in the parts manual and you're not guessing😁
 

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@drs455aws your diagram saved my butt. I had (don't ask me how) the bottom two lines crossed. The hard line that feeds the aux valve and one of the steering cylinder hoses.
The diagram and pics I took before disassembly apparently were not clear enough for these old eyes. I replaced all o-rings on the 445 along with both cylinder hoses and the pump to valve hose. The only hoses remaining are the rear lift cylinder hoses but they look to be in great shape for now.
Glad it helped. It was just for my own use originally. That's why it looks so rough.
 
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